Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - Chemical Bike Lock Causes Vomiting to Deter Thieves writes: Ever had a bike stolen? Bike thieves have had virtually free rein around San Francisco and the Bay area for years, stealing thousands every year, turning warehouses and underpasses into chop shops, victimizing residents and city officials alike. But BBC reports on a new weapon in the arsenal of devices developed to thwart would-be thieves — a bicycle lock that spews a pressurized, stinking gas if someone attempts to cut the lock. The company claims its "noxious chemical" is so disgusting it "induces vomit in the majority of cases." Even better, it claims, the gas causes "shortness of breathing" and impaired eyesight. The company says that the compressed gas is perfectly safe — and can only be released "by trying to cut through it with an angle grinder". If the chemical countermeasure is released, it is a one-time only use, and the lock — which costs over $100 — will have to be replaced. But the hope is that the unpleasant experience will cause them to abandon the attempted theft, leaving the bicycle behind. The inventors have not yet tested the device on an actual would-be thief, but have tested it on themselves and volunteers at distances of two feet, five feet, 10ft and 20ft. “At two feet it was pretty bad. It was absolutely vomit inducing in 99% of people. At five feet it’s very noticeable and the initial reaction is to move away from it. At 10ft it’s definitely detectable and very unpleasant.”

Submission + - A solution for DDOS packet flooding attacks (

dgallard writes: On October 21, 2016, a DDOS attack crippled access to major Web sites including Amazon and Netflix.

PEIP (Path Enhanced IP) extends the IP protocol to enable determining the router path of packets sent to a target host. Currently, there is no information to indicate which routers a packet traversed on its way to a destination (DDOS target) enabling use of forged source IP addresses to attack the target via packet flooding.

PEIP changes all that. Rather than attempting to prevent attack packets, instead, PEIP provides a way to rate-limit all packets based on their router path to a destination. In this way, DDOS attacks can be thwarted be simply only allowing them a limited amount of bandwith.

Comment Re:Predictable (Score 5, Informative) 338

This rocket was brand new it was the first that would have been SCHEDULED TO REUSE later after this launch.


--quote-- For SpaceX, the private space company owned by Elon Musk, it was the "first launch of [a] flight-proven first stage," the company says. The mission was using the same rocket booster that sent the Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station earlier this year. --end quote--

Sorry, but that quote is wrong. The first reused booster is (was?) scheduled to launch SES-10 later this year.

Submission + - Researchers sport system to pull rare earth materials from used hard drives (

coondoggie writes: Open and easy access to rare earth materials — which are critical parts of electronics in everything from cars to computers — is still more a dream than reality. One of the ways to address that anxiety is to harvest and reuse such material from used electronic components – in particular computer hard drives.

Comment Re:Misleading article. (Score 3, Insightful) 149

Exactly, and I think this is what the AC was trying to say in one of the earlier responses.

The headline seems as if it is trying to tie this story to all the recent reports of the agency actively weakening crypto algorithms.

It would have been insane to allow classified algorithms to be published along with TCP/IP (unless of course they were willing to declassify).

I didn't watch the video, but read TFA. There, Cerf is quoted to say:
1. “If I had in my hands the kinds of cryptographic technology we have today, I would absolutely have used it,”
2. “During the mid 1970s while I was still at Stanford and working on this, I also worked with the NSA on a secure version of the Internet, but one that used classified cryptographic technology. At the time I couldn’t share that with my friends,” Cerf said. “So I was leading this kind of schizoid existence for a while.”

Maybe he said it in the video, but in TFA he does not say "I wanted to use the classified technology in TCP/IP but the agency denied my request."


Submission + - Application Development is a $9 Billion Industry (

CowboyRobot writes: "Although not as lucrative as video games or movies, Gartner projects the software application development industry to pass the US$9 Billion mark this year. They credit "evolving software delivery models, new development methodologies, emerging mobile application development, and open source software". Also in the report is a projection that "mobile application development projects targeting smartphones and tablets will outnumber native PC projects by a ratio of 4:1 by 2015.""

Submission + - Neil Armstrong has died, NBC News reports ( 1

dsinc writes: Neil Armstrong, first man on the Moon, has died. NBC News broke the news, without giving other details. Neil was recovering from a heart-bypass surgery he had had a couple of weeks ago. Sad news, marking the end of a glorious and more optimistic era...
RIP, Neil.

Slashdot Top Deals

One good reason why computers can do more work than people is that they never have to stop and answer the phone.