Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:As usual the press distorts the story (Score 1) 270

Meanwhile in the real world the few new shelters will be dangerous shitholes that are "three months and out" and/or come with mandatory religious indoctrination. If there really were viable alternatives the homeless would move in without the help of the police. You don't make a law to force people to do something if it's actually a better alternative for them.

Submission + - SPAM: Prosecutorial Misconduct is Now a Felony in California 1

schwit1 writes: Along with signing a major asset forfeiture reform bill last week, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill into law making it a felony for prosecutors to intentionally withhold evidence.

Under the new law, prosecutors who alter or intentionally withhold evidence from defense counsels can face up to three years in prison. Previously, prosecutorial misconduct in California was only a misdemeanor. Courts were statutorily required to report misconduct to the state bar association, but advocates of the bill say the laws were rarely enforced.

"When a prosecutor intentionally withholds exculpatory evidence, an unknowing and innocent defendant can be convicted, sentenced, and incarcerated for a long time," California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, a group of criminal defense lawyers that supported the bill, told The Los Angeles Times. "These bad-acting prosecutors rarely, if ever, face any actually consequences for their actions."

Link to Original Source

Comment Musk is way ahead (Score 5, Insightful) 254

Musk announced SpaceX will try to get something to Mars every other year for the next 20 years.I'm not saying Boeing doesn't have the engineering talent but I seriously doubt it has the will to beat Musk to Mars. Musk said, this is what we're doing, this is when, and this is how. Boeing said, over the next few decades we're going to put tourists in earth orbit. There isn't even a competition at this point.

Submission + - Amazon Bans Incentivized Reviews Tied To Free or Discounted Products (

An anonymous reader writes: Amazon is making a significant change to its Community Guidelines, announced today, which will eliminate any incentivized reviews, except for those that emerge from within its own Amazon Vine program. This program allows Amazon – not the seller or vendor – to identify trusted reviewers, and has a number of controls in place in order to keep bias out of the review process. Amazon has historically prohibited compensation for reviews – even going so far as to sue those businesses who pay for fake reviews, as well as the individuals who write them, in an effort to make its review and rating system fairer and more helpful to online shoppers. However, it has allowed businesses to offer products to customers in exchange for their “honest” review. The only condition was that those reviewers would have to disclose their affiliation with the business in question in the text of their review. Reviewers were generally offered the product for free or at a discounted price, in exchange for their review. Although, in theory, these reviewers could write their true opinion on the product – positive or negative – these incentivized reviews have tended to be overwhelmingly biased in favor of the product being rated. Amazon says that, going forward, the only incentivized reviews will be those from Amazon Vine. These don’t work the same way, however. For starters, Amazon selects who will be allowed to review products, and it does so mainly to boost the review count on new or pre-release products that haven’t yet generated enough sales to have a large number of organic reviews. Vine reviewers are invited to join the program only after having written a number of reviews voted as “helpful” by other customers, and tend to have expertise in a specific product category. In addition, vendors don’t have any contact with Vine reviewers, nor do they get to influence which reviewers will receive their products, which are submitted directly to Amazon for distribution. These changes will apply to all product categories other than books, as Amazon has always allowed advance copies of books to be distributed, the retailer notes.

Submission + - SPAM: MITRE Dangles $50,000 Prize for Spotting Rogue Internet of Things Devices

chicksdaddy writes: MITRE Corporation, the non-profit corporation that helps tackle some of the trickiest technical and security challenges out there is dangling a $50,000 prize for anyone who can develop a solution for spotting rogue devices within an Internet of Things Network. ([spam URL stripped])

The company announced its MITRE Challenge IoT over the summer, saying that it was looking for ground breaking new approaches to securing diverse Internet of Things networks like those in connected homes.


"Network administrators need to know exactly what is in the environment, or the network—including when an adversary has switched out one device for another. In other words, is the smart thermostat we see today the same one that was there yesterday? We are looking for a unique identifier or fingerprint to enable administrators to enumerate the IoT devices while passively observing the network...The MITRE Challenge, Unique Identification of IoT Devices, seeks to discover possible solutions to this potential threat so our sponsors can reap the benefits of this technological evolution, while minimizing the risks." Registration was supposed to wrap up September 30, but the registration site is still online: [spam URL stripped]...

MITRE was awarded $29 million from the U.S. Commerce Department in 2014 to establish the nation’s first federally funded National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE). ([spam URL stripped]) Under that contract, MITRE is responsible for operating the federally funded research and development center (FFRDC) in the areas of research, development, engineering and technical support; operations management; and facilities management.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Man in Japan arrested for jailbreaking iPhones

execthis writes: From a story at :

Japanese police have arrested a hacker for illegally removing software restrictions on Apple's iPhones and selling the devices.

Daisuke Ikeda, who is 24 and from Toyama City, is suspected of what's called "jailbreaking" and infringing Apple's intellectual property rights.

This is really unbelievable. I feel sorry for anyone who lives in Japan :-(

Submission + - Self-Driving Chairs Are Coming (

jasonbrown writes: Nissan, the Japanese automaker this week debuted what it's calling the ProPILOT Chair — an autonomous chair that automatically queues for you while you sit back and relax. With its built-in cameras, the high-tech chair "detects and automatically follows the chair ahead of it, maintaining a fixed distance and travelling along a set path." Standing (or sitting) in line has never been so much fun.

Submission + - New formula massively reduces prime number memory requirements.

grcumb writes: Peruvian mathematician Harald Helfgott made his mark on the history of mathematics by solving Goldbach's Weak Conjecture, which every odd number greater than 5 can be expressed as the sum of three prime numbers. Now, according to Scientific American, he's found a better solution to the Sieve of Erasthones:

In order to determine with this sieve all primes between 1 and 100, for example, one has to write down the list of numbers in numerical order and start crossing them out in a certain order: first, the multiples of 2 (except the 2); then, the multiples of 3, except the 3; and so on, starting by the next number that had not been crossed out. The numbers that survive this procedure will be the primes. The method can be formulated as an algorithm.

But now, Helfgott has found a method to drastically reduce the amount of RAM required to run the algorithm:

Helfgott was able to modify the sieve of Eratosthenes to work with less physical memory space. In mathematical terms: instead of needing a space N, now it is enough to have the cube root of N.

So what will be the impact of this? Will we see cheaper, lower-power encryption devices? Or maybe quicker cracking times in brute force attacks?

Submission + - Corporations feel cyber breaches are a minor cost of business

northernboy writes: The Rand Corporation has completed a study of corporate responses to cybersecurity breaches which shows that most corporate loses fall into the range of a minor cost of doing business.
From the press release:
Researchers found that the typical cost of a breach was about $200,000 and that most cyber events cost companies less than 0.4 percent of their annual revenues. The $200,000 cost was roughly equivalent to a typical company's annual information security budget.

“Relative to all the other risks companies face, the cyber risks often aren't as big a deal as we think,” said Sasha Romanosky, author of the study and a policy researcher at RAND, a nonprofit research organization. “It may be bad for you if you are the victim, but it doesn't change the behavior or strategy of a company. Like you and me, companies are self-interested and operate in ways that minimize their costs. You can't begrudge them for working that way.” ...
  “If it is true that on average that businesses lose 5 percent of their annual revenue to fraud, and that the cost of a cyber event represents only 0.4 percent of a firm's revenues, then one may conclude that these hacks, attacks and careless behaviors represent a small fraction of the costs that firms face, and therefore only a small portion of the cost of doing business,” Romanosky said.

Given that finding — and surveys that indicate consumers are mostly satisfied with the ways companies respond to data breaches — he says that businesses “lack a strong incentive to increase their investment in data security and privacy protection.” Moreover, if their losses are not out of line with other costs, he said, “maybe the firms are already doing the right thing,” making government policies to induce more precautions unnecessary.

So, cheer up! There isn't really any significant problem here. Unless you happen to be a consumer, but Hey, if the current ones get damaged, there are always plenty more where they came from...

Submission + - How will we know a vehicle model is "driverless" (

RockDoctor writes: Some people differ, but having gone through dozens of (simulated) aircraft crashes as part of safety training for work, I hugely prefer to face backwards when travelling. Plane (no choice) train (choice) or automobile (rarely a choice), I prefer to be in a seat that will absorb my momentum from the start of an impact.
The "driverless car" will not be here until all people in the front row of the device face against the direction of travel. Anything less is a partial solution, waiting for a human to take over in a complex situation.
My wife can't travel facing backwards. So I take the risk of being killed by her flying body after I survive the crash. Joy, not.
People will learn to live with it.


Slashdot Top Deals

A university faculty is 500 egotists with a common parking problem.