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Submission + - Malicious online advertisements hit major outlets (

MarcAuslander writes: Major websites including the BBC, Newsweek, The New York Times and MSN ran malicious online advertisements on Sunday that attacked users’ computers, a campaign that one expert said was the largest seen in two years.

Submission + - How to hijack a journal (

MarcAuslander writes: According to a tip sent to Science, fraudsters are snatching entire Web addresses, known as Internet domains, right out from under academic publishers, erecting fake versions of their sites, and hijacking their journals, along with their Web traffic. Snatching the official domain is an insidious twist: Unsuspecting visitors who log into the hijacked journal sites might give away passwords or money as they try to pay subscriptions or article processing fees. Science's investigation confirmed that this scam is real, identifying 24 recently snatched journal domains, and revealed how the hijackers are likely doing it—the author even snatched the domain of a journal for a day to show how easy the method is.

Submission + - IBM Scientists Find New Way to Shrink Transistors (

MarcAuslander writes: In the semiconductor business, it is called the “red brick wall” — the limit of the industry’s ability to shrink transistors beyond a certain size.

On Thursday, however, IBM scientists reported that they now believe they see a path around the wall. Writing in the journal Science, a team at the company’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center said it has found a new way to make transistors from parallel rows of carbon nanotubes.

Submission + - Test trial to use computer servers to heat homes ( 1

MarcAuslander writes: Eneco, a Dutch-based energy company with more than 2 million customers, said Tuesday it is installing "e-Radiators" — computer servers that generate heat while crunching numbers — in five homes across the Netherlands in a trial to see if their warmth could be a commercially viable alternative for traditional radiators.

Comment They've forgotten the Microsoft Diode (Score 1) 445

Microsoft long ago took over areas dominated by others with the Microsoft "diode".

Step one was the run the leader's stuff - for example their document format.

Step two was to "enhance" the support in a way that made new work incompatible with the former leader.

If they ever want people to buy their smartphones, they will have to start by running Android apps until they get to the point where Windows phone is a necessary app target, just as Apple and Android are today.

Comment Net metering is unstustainable (Score 5, Insightful) 374

The current system lets the home owner use the power grid as a battery, storing excess energy for later use. And this battery is free. But it's not free - someone has to pay for the power lines, meters, and generation or storage capacity that makes it work.

Electric bills have two components, the supply cost and the delivery cost. The supply cost is what the electric company should be paying for electricity it buys from the home owner. But the electricity the home owner buys back should include the delivery cost.

In effect, the utilities are subsidizing home generation, which may make sense for now, but is not a plausible end game.

Comment Ignores how disks often fail (Score 2) 258

My understanding is that disks often fail when a head touches the surface, or a piece of dirt gets between the head and the surface. Once that happens, more dirt is produced, increasing the probability of more head crashes, leading to a failure cascade. As a consequence, once one of my drives starts to show unrecoverable errors, corresponding to damaged surface areas, I replace it while it can still be read.

The spare platter strategy does nothing to reduce this failure mode. In fact, all modern disks already have spare space for bad block relocation.

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