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Comment Re:Tor? (Score 1) 186

Fact - people are lazy animals, and if you put obstacles in front of them, the vast majority of them look for the path of least resistance, even if it yields an inferior result.

Yes. And that's why people "pirate": the copyright cartels have made it so inconvenient to get usable content that even if you throw a bunch of caltrops in the road to TPB, it's still better than a DVD with unskippable warnings and ads, or stuttering streaming video.

Comment "private innovation"? (Score 1) 101

According to the wik, "The development of the laser enabled the first practical optical holograms that recorded 3D objects to be made in 1962 by Yuri Denisyuk in the Soviet Unionand by Emmett Leith and Juris Upatnieks at the University of Michigan, USA." Commies and socialized public universities gave us the hologram.

Comment Re:Meaningless (Score 1) 745

A global nuclear exchange ends civilization as we know it in minutes while climatic changes are something that we can adapt to

Climate change makes wars and conflicts more likely. (That's a Pentagon assessment.) More wars make escalation into a nuclear exchange more likely.

I do love how the denialist positions has evolved from "There is no warming!" to "Ok, there's warming, but it's not human caused!" to "Ok, there's warming and we're causing it, but we'll just adapt!"

Comment Re: No. (Score 1) 449

My only fear: letting people get controlled by the advertisers and the government, each of whom are power hungry and relentless.

That's the real problem. Today, a computer user with any sophistication spends a great deal of time fighting their device and operating system to make it be the owner's servant rather than a spy and advertising delivery device. Rather than coding apps for my phone, I spent a lot of time this week finding hacks to fake location services for an intrusive app I wanted to use. (Just fake GPS doesn't do it anymore when apps use Google Play services and check your location via networks. The answer, BTW, turned out to be an Xposed module.)

Comment selection bias and general quackery (Score 5, Informative) 560

The usual Reefer Madness bad science of prohibitionists:

All data were obtained for analysis from a large multisite database, involving 26,268 patients who came for evaluation of complex, treatment resistant issues to one of nine outpatient neuropsychiatric clinics across the United States

But "people with serious neuropsychiatric people who used cannabis have low blood flow to the brain" is both less clickworthy and less politically useful than "OMG pot rots yr brain!"

And I love this: "As a physician who routinely sees marijuana users..." Yeah, that's called "a physician". Cannabis use is common, every physician has seen patients who has used it.

Both Amen and this methodology are poorly regarded. He's in the addiction treatment industry -- look at this is an old marketing pitch of his quoted in a Quackwatch article:

How your brain and soul work together determines how happy you feel, how successful you become, and how well you connect with others. The brain-soul connection is vastly more powerful than your conscious will. Will power falters when the physical functioning of the brain and the health of your soul fail to support your desires, as seen by illogical behaviors like overeating, smoking, drug and alcohol abuse, and compulsive spending.

OHOH, Officials at major psychiatric and neuroscience associations and research centers say his SPECT claims are no more than myth and poppycock, buffaloing an unsuspecting public.

Comment Re: No? (Score 1) 375

Which things were declared unconstitutional by the judicial branch?

You seem to under the misapprehension that the opinions of courts make something constitutional or unconstitutional. No. It's the text of the constitution that makes it so. For example, Obergefell v. Hodges did not make it unconstitutional for the states to deny equal protection of the law to gay couples; it became unconstitutional long ago, when Amendment XIV took effect. If some future right-wing court undoes the Obergefell decision, it will still be unconstitutional and illegal for the states to deny equal protection.

Comment Re: Fake GPS location spoofer (Score 1) 395

Why don't you just not use a device w/ Google software on it?

Because due to the way that capitalism corrodes market choice and reduces product quality, I have two viable choices for a smartphone: walled-garden bullshit from Google, or walled-garden bullshit from Apple. Since GOOG's walls are a little lower and I can climb over them more easily, I take that lesser of evils...along with a sledgehammer to break down those walls.

Comment Re: Next Phase (Score 1) 644

When someone is sitting on your chest and slamming the back of your head into the sidewalk, you can shoot him in any State, stand your ground or otherwise.

Not when that someone is defending themselves against your assault, no. You cannot attack someone and then claim self-defense. It was Trayvon Martin who had the legal and moral right to stand his ground that night; it's unfortunate that the bad guy was armed and got away with it.

Comment Re:Speech as a crime (Score 2) 161

You do have a right to stop someone from saying things that a reasonable person would perceive as threatening.

And there's very little that someone hundreds of miles away from you can say over the internet that a reasonable person would perceive as threatening.

Someone in the same room with me, or standing in front of my house, saying "I'm going to punch you in the face for what you said!" is a true threat, the person has the imminent means and opportunity to carry it out. Someone in a different city tweeting "@tom_swiss I'm going to punch you in the face for what you said!" is not a threat. Their arms just aren't that long.

Comment Re:Oh yeah, that's money well spent (Score 1) 161

Can somebody tell me why motivation makes a difference?

Because intent matters.

Intent is a very different thing than motive. Motive, in your example is the reason why the first guy planned his murder: for gain, for the lulz, ethnic or religious or political hatred, whatever. The act is still one of deliberate intent, regardless of motive. Your second guy had no intent to kill.

Motive may matter when we turn to the question of how to rehabilitate a criminal. But it can play no rightful role in defining a crime.

Comment Re:B-b-b-but GUNZ is SKEEERY!! (Score 1) 331

If guns kill people, then no one ever kills themselves; they are murdered by various inanimate objects: guns, ropes, knives, bridges, pills, etc. I don't see people talking about someone who hanged themselves as a "rope death" or someone who jumped of a bridge as a "bridge death". It's as if guns were a special case, for some political reason.

Comment Re:Who cares..?? (Score 1) 704

... and elect a ho-hum stay-the-course centrist....

You misspelled "unprincipled sociopathic war criminal" there. Unfortunately it's not a choice of stepping into a dog turd to avoid a bullet, it's falling on a sword to avoid a bullet.

The only thing to do in that situation is use all available means to push the system into giving you more choices next iteration. Vote Green or Libertarian and demand electoral reform.

Comment Re:Always been doing it (Score 5, Interesting) 107

So since you are hearing ads (and I'm assuming you a relatively young anonymous coward) you would rather hear irrelevant ads shilling restless leg syndrome aids VS cheap flights to cancun?

Can't speak for the AC, but if I can't avoid corporate mind control (a.k.a. advertising) entirely I'd like it to be as mistargeted as possible. Facebook sometimes seems to think I'm in Sri Lanka or Laos and sends me ads I can't read, that's perfect.

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