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Submission + - State: Benghazi emails involving Clinton recovered by FBI (

An anonymous reader writes: With Hillary Clinton continuing her run of days without a press conference, the nation is growing increasingly concerned as day after day more headlines — from even the mainstream media — cast shadows over her actions as Secretary of State. With more records reported to be released tomorrow, AP reports another nail in the coffin of Clinton honesty today as The State Department is forced to admit that The FBI has discovered dozens of emails related to Benghazi that Clinton failed to hand over.

One can't help but agree with Colin Kaepernick's assessment of Hillary Clinton...

We have a presidential candidate who has deleted emails and done things illegally...That doesn't make sense to me because if that was any other person you'd be in prison. So, what is this country really standing for?

Good question Colin.

Comment Actually it has... (Score 1) 1095

This article is from 2013 and the perpetrator was using a disguised camera. Legalizing such behaviour, in the absence of a camera, doesn't seem to be likely to decrease the chance of such abuses. Additionally, a campus is an unlikely place for such things to occur as students are typically governed by a code of conduct. Just as corporate bathrooms are unlikely to suffer such abuse. Truly public bathrooms however wouldn't have that issue for the would-be pervert abusing society's good will.

Overall I think this could be remedied by moving to single occupant rest rooms and doing away with gender designations on them. While that last bit is unnecessary it would make the subject of gender in regards to rest rooms moot.

Comment published doc counters some misinformation (Score 2) 1095

"Myths vs Facts: What New York Times, Huffington Post and other media outlets aren't saying about common-sense privacy law"

Of course, the validity of it's assertions is still in question, but it seems relevant to your statement. Particularly the part that says, "this law establishes a statewide anti-discrimination policy in North Carolina which is tougher than the federal government’s." It will be interesting to see how things play out over time.

Comment Re:Meanwhile my phone crashes about once a month.. (Score 1) 265

All true, but how much damage can be done before a pattern is established? I think that such insurance will be expensive at the outset. I think having manual controls in the event of a problem will reduce the cost of that insurance. I also hope that they avoid costly mistakes that could make this technology common in the distant future.

Still, while there are techniques to make releasing software as safe as it can be companies still find the need every year to perform a live network change. The issue might not exhibit itself in a small initial release, but be devastating (read kills people) once it reaches a larger audience. For example, the software works great in Sunnyvale, but in icy conditions in northern states cars spin out their traction control failing to account for it.

Furthermore, what about some malware attack that exploits a newly added hole. The insidious rogue code waits for a period of time to propagate using vehicle to vehicle communication then one day goes on a murderous rampage at noon on a Tuesday?

Everyone was out to lunch to get some wonderful tacos, but instead... vehicular armageddon ensues!

Well, that is a bit far out there, but I still don't envy the position of the insurance companies. Having a licensed driver at the wheel and override controls at the ready can mitigate much risk. I wouldn't feel comfortable in a car that lacked manual controls. I would also prefer that early adopters of this new technology be made to remain at attention and ready to take over or face a hefty citation. At least for five years or so until the technology had proven itself. If no death or serious damage to property occurs within such a time we could re-evaluate the idea that someone in the driver's seat must remain at attention. Removing override controls should take much longer.

Comment Re:Meanwhile my phone crashes about once a month.. (Score 1) 265

Your comparison is a bit apples and oranges. How may people have stepped out in front of an air plane in flight? The systems for avoidance here are a bit more advanced. Aircraft typically know about collision threats miles away. Human traffic controllers manage this avoidance. Are we going to fit all the things that might get into the path of the car with transponders? Automating the piloting of a motor vehicle safely is far more complex than flight.

Comment Re:Meanwhile my phone crashes about once a month.. (Score 2) 265

The thing is that a third party would actually be responsible for the accident, and as such you would need additional coverage specifically for the case. Insurance policies spell out such things. They want to even know how much you drive it on average, where you drive and in what conditions. They take into account things like if it is a motor cycle all the way up to a tractor trailer. The price of insurance is based on these factors.

Now add the concept of hardware driving the car. Sure, we can demonstrate that this car with this software is this safe, but then comes a software update. This makes the insurance company's management of their risk much more difficult. All it takes is one bad update and lets say, hypothetically, a vehicle or two careens into the side of a bus. Some analysis and a patch later and all of a sudden we are at a new version without the bus smashing feature, but did that update add a toddler avoidance error?

AI "drivers" receiving software updates only add to the chaos that is our roads. No one has died yet, but someday someone will.

Comment Already there... (Score 1) 179

I've actually cut over already, and Windows 10 is to blame. It wasn't just the terrible UI, but also how Cortana seemed to break constantly. When it did it forced a reboot that could require several more reboots to get running again. I was sick of buying a computer for Microsoft to use as they see fit, and instead opted to have a personal computer again. What was funny is that I managed to get all the games I play, short of Skyrim, to run under Linux. If the game can't be played on my Linux box or one of our game consoles it's not really worth the headache of playing it on such a terrible OS.

Comment Going the way of FOX (Score 1) 1310


It troubles me that the dice fam has purchased the now sold out Slashdot. These days it is difficult to find unbiased news sources, and selling to a spammer company is telling. I hope everyone who made Slashdot what it was makes a killing off of Dice. I'm also somewhat pleased that I have found better sources of news for nerds on stuff that matters.

Slashdot always allowed me to turn off ads. I never did, but now I will blacklist slashdot's advertisers via ghostery through my "untrusted" browser. That is, if I ever bother to come back. I don't care for Dice. I think they are, in my opinion, a disreputable company. You may, of course, do as you will.

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