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Comment Some Irony There... (Score 4, Insightful) 202

Blackberry's CEO is just positioning itself as the cocksucker for governments.
Anything for some more contracts, I guess. They need whatever they can get.

A bit ironic, as part of the reason for Blackberry's decline is that businesses can't trust they won't hand over their secure communications to whatever entity asks for it.

Comment Re: Checkmate (Score 1) 879

Out of the two which one was inept enough to use a private email server potentially exposing national secrets.

She won't need to get us into WW3. They will blow us up with out own nukes by stealing nuclear launch codes from her iPhone.

Given how many government servers have been broken into the last ten years, the emails are probably safer on her private server than on the government ones.

Comment Re:Hillary vs Trump (Score 4, Insightful) 879

What in the world? Hillary Clinton's two biggest "controversies" are Benghazi, which is about as much of a controversy as global warming, and this whole email scandal where she used a private server instead of the State Department one. Given how many government servers have been hacked in the last ten years, the emails were probably safer there than they were on the government system anyway.

Pretending that Hillary Clinton is anywhere in the same zip code as despicable a person as Trump is to ignore basic facts about the two people and their history. The only reason people even think stupid things like this is because we've been taught by the 24-hour news cycle to look at the constantly-updating horse race statistics rather than the actual policies and histories of the candidates.

Comment Re: This is sad seeing republicans... (Score 1) 702

You appear to believe this is an either/or situation. I would suggest that, as significantly smaller governments HAVE existed, would prove that we do not have a binary solution set, but that there is an entire range of solutions. Some of which would be acceptable to the vast majority of the population. . .

The fact that smaller governments have existed does not mean that those governments were better. The US government in the 1950s and 60s would be considered enormous by today's standards: marginal tax rates on the very wealthy were as high as 90%, with the balance going to building the national highway system and the Apollo missions. Back then the middle class was growing, and poverty was shrinking. As our tax rate flattens, with Reagan and Bush's voodoo-economics inspired tax cuts to the wealthy, we've seen this trend reverse, with the rich getting richer, the poor getting poorer, and the middle class shrinking rapidly.

Comment Re: This is sad seeing republicans... (Score 3, Insightful) 702

A government powerful enough to give you everything you want is powerful enough to take everything you have.

In a vacuum, yes this is true, a powerful government can take everything from you. Keep in mind, though, that the alternative is to allow powerful individuals to control everything instead; in that case, a state which humanity has languished in for thousands of years, those powerful individuals will take everything from you.

The large middle class that we've seen rise in America and other modern countries has only come into existence thanks to the tireless work of powerful governments holding back the power of the very wealthy. It's no surprise that, now that those very wealthy have managed to subvert the government, we are seeing the middle class shrink, battered by high costs imposed by the rent-seeking rich.

Comment Pre-empting UI Fragmentation... Good! (Score 1) 68

So, Google is deciding to fix its past mistakes with not implementing multi-window, and now they're actually looking forward and supporting features that aren't in any existing phones. Great!

Maybe we'll see decent keyboard/mouse support next, given that there are already netbooks out there running Android.

Comment Re:RAH had this in the 50's (Score 1) 235

Every dollar spent on space exploration has come back to us tenfold. No other investment in history can make such a boast. Most of your "better ideas" have in fact proven to be losers over time, especially direct economic aid to poorer nations. You talk about setting aside emotional commitments and embracing rationality. Practice what you preach, shut up and multiply.

Comment Re:RAH had this in the 50's (Score 4, Insightful) 235

Space exploration and colonization are hopeless fantasies. Nobody in their right mind is going to spend insane fortunes to explore and colonize the most inhospitable places there are, for no apparent benefit.

Hopeless or not, we have to do it. Right now all of humanity is in a single interconnected biosphere, that is one rich crazy dickhead away from becoming uninhabitable. How many people are out there right now claiming that we can do anything we want to the Earth and humanity can never become extinct, because God? We need to get sustainable populations off of this planet and somewhere they can survive for when the inevitable happens and one of those mouth-breathing morons hits the wrong button somewhere and releases super-Ebola into the atmosphere or something.

Comment Re:Dont worry, they will just take it from somewhe (Score 1) 330

You could have just said "republicans," and we would have understood.

Not all Republicans are ignorant jackasses. Some just don't care about anything other than lowering their own taxes at any cost. Some have bought into the delusion of upward mobility that this country still peddles, despite all the mounting evidence that the difference between rungs in the social ladder are greater than any time in the past 100 years. And some are actually very nice people, but continue voting for Republicans for reasons of social inertia or the sunk cost fallacy, effectively rendering them ineffectual sockpuppets for the ignorant jackasses.

Democrats are slightly, slightly better, but really until someone succeeds in removing the massive amounts of outside money necessary to run for national elected office you'll never see anyone in the House or Senate who actually represents the people who supposedly elected them into office.

Comment Re:Dont worry, they will just take it from somewhe (Score 5, Informative) 330

They have been taking water from somewhere for a long time, cant they just take more of someone else' water in order to live in a desert?

Hey, the USA is a large and sparsely populated country.... How about you try living in some of the more habitable areas?

Nobody lives in the California Desert. Well, okay, we do have a decent retirement community out in Palm Springs, but the parts that most people settled on were temperate grasslands, forests, and wetlands (the Central Valley was an inland sea for much of the year before we dammed it all up).

The real problems are:

1) Irresponsible farming by agribusinesses. This one here is the biggie, but is really hard to control because the biggest agribusinesses have so much political clout, both here and in Washington.

2) 150 years of politics. For well over a century, the saying has gone, "Liquor is for drinking; water is for fighting." There are a byzantine set of local, regional, statewide, interstate, and international laws governing how water is used everywhere in the state, most of it based on environmental studies decades or centuries out of date, and none of it changes quickly.

3) Wetland destruction. For a long, long time nobody understood the value of wetlands in water table control, flood prevention, and ecosystem management, and so much of it was filled in and paved over in the last 100 years. This has proven to be a huge mistake, one that will take decades and billions of dollars to fix, and isn't helped by ignorant jackasses who insist that environmental concerns don't exist, that scientists are hucksters, and that God will provide everything we could ever want, forever.

4) Climate change. The theory is nearly 200 years old; the lab-scale proof is over 150 years old; definitive proof it's happening out in the environment is over 50 years old. It's happening, right now, and given politics and the endless prattle of ignorant jackasses it doesn't look like it's going to be slowing down any time soon.

Did you notice what's not on that list? Cities. All of the urban and suburban development in California accounts for less than 10% of the state's annual water usage (the vast, vast majority is used for agriculture), and the number is dropping every year, as more efficiency and water recycling programs come online.

Comment Re:"Michigan, give us your water!" (Score 4, Insightful) 330

Those wetlands you're disparaging are flood control systems. Those wetlands keep the rain from flowing straight out into the ocean; part of the reason we're in this mess now is that we've spent the last 100 years plowing them into the ground and pouring concrete over them (see: LA river).

Comment Big Mistake (Score 3, Insightful) 33

And thus does Intel make the same mistake that hundreds of companies around the world have made before it: putting intellectual property in physical reach of the Chinese government. Fast forward five years and I'm almost certain we'll see Foxconn or some other Chinese company with ties to the Chinese government have a series of "research breakthroughs" that mysteriously parallel the exact technologies that Intel brought to its own plant, which is once again down for "inspection".

It's not like this sort of thing hasn't happened already.

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