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Comment Re:How to do anything in 2017 (Score 2) 312

I have been a programmer 25 years and I have never had to manage memory in my life, and nor would i want to start managing it now. I wrote my first iOS app before they implemented ARC (automatic reference counting) and i swore blind i would never write another. I think a lot of people thought the same thing and ARC appeared with the next xcode release. There are more important things in programming then wondering if you can delete an array safely.

As parent said, JS first, C# second and thats it. You can learn JS with just a browser and a text editor. For C# you need the community edition which pretty much lets you code anything from Hello World to a website.

C and C++ just have too much baggage associated with them.

Submission + - China runs checks on Bitcoin exchanges, Triggers Dip on Currency

randomErr writes: The People's Bank of China started spot checks on major Bitcoin exchanges starting a dip in the digital currency value for fears of a crackdown. China's central bank inspections of BTCC, Huobi, and OKCoin were conducted to find any potential regulatory breach. The news caused at least a 12 percent dip in the price of Bitcoin against the US dollar. Bitcoin was trading around $910 early-Wednesday and by late-Thursday.was down to $759.

Comment one platform - end to end (Score 1) 589

I know Visual Studio is clunky but can open source provide anything as powerful? By that i mean you can debug/step through code in the web page, the middle tier and even in managed stored procedures in the database, all from the same IDE. Not having to swap between three different applications, from three different sources. Can OS do anything similar?

Comment Re:When upgrades break code (Score 1) 432

Yeah, because I would love to spend my time maintaining something that is no longer supported, while my skill set slowly goes the same way as my will to live.

You really need to badger your managers to upgrade things every couple of years or so. If you do it continually then it is not going to be as painful as jumping a couple of releases of the language in one go. Unless you do new stuff and use the latest technologies then your working practices are going to remain the same. Things move fast these days (though not that fast in the python world). To reference a language I am more familiar with, I am sure a C# application written in .Net 1 would probably still compile and run on a new machine, however, whatever it is doing, you can guarantee there are better ways of doing it these days. Probably in half the code.

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