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Comment Re:Freeciv is better for suited for school (Score 1) 198

"While Civilization might have better graphics/sounds, that doesn't add much to the "educational" value."

When I was a director of a summer "Computer Camp" in the 1990s, we allowed our campers to play Civilization II. Within it was a plethora of information on historical figures, places, etc... to which the campers were actively seeking out in the "Civilopedia" as they played. Seeing this engagement across genders and ages, was a key reason why I sought out employment at Microprose after college. (Disclaimer: I'm currently employed by Firaxis; opinions stated here are my own.)

Civ5 has built on Civ; each version has pushed the level of graphics and sound which a few have argued do add educational value as it makes the content more compelling; I agree.

The last few versions of Civilization have offered a great deal of MODability. You too can change game rules, UI, etc... by modifying XML and the supplied LUA. As for the depth of what you can do, check out this awesome WIKI fans made of the MOD system:

Comment Re:Overclocking errors can be a simple wrong numbe (Score 1) 325

There is a great article by Jeff Atwood on building a system: If you aren't familiar, he's developer that has been blogging for about a decade and is read by a number of developers.

In this article, he references a series of articles wrote back in 2007, when he was building his previous development machine. It includes a section on Overclocking:

The take-away: there is a risk of stability, but it's considered low enough in the the cost/performance ratio that he advocates overclocking his development box.

Comment Re:As others said (Score 1) 269

Also a +1 for Fastmail. I was using Spamcop for over a decade until they spun down services a little over a year ago. I asked them what they recommended and pointed me to Fastmail ( ). Great service for native mail clients, a good online interface, and an informative blog ( ). Worth the $10 to $40 a year IMHO.

Comment Re:Support standard protocols! (Score 1) 263

"Else just take a simple cheap webcam and do it yourself. A webcam, a rPi and a bit of coding ought to get you what you need easily."
This is the exact question I'm asking.... a good quality, (cheap if possible), webcam that can quickly be setup for this task of sending images to a server for a web-page to display. So far it doesn't look to exist.

Making it easy for the common user to send something to dropbox is fine, I just agree with Mobydisk that there should be some support for more advanced standards, if a user decides to tread there (WebDAV, SFTP, etc...). And as for FTP, it seems the cameras that support it (e.g., Foscam, Hikvision, etc...) don't support SFTP or FTP-S, the all only support vanilla, insecure, FTP....but that's a different issue.

I went into this thinking it could all be setup in no more than a few hours one afternoon; many of these solutions will take many days. (e.g., rPi is an interesting avenue, and may be something I'll jump into, as I've wanted an excuse to play with one, but it won't be "quick")

Comment Re:Because (Score 1) 263

That is a good question...
It doesn't have to be trigger by motion; that is just a likely scenario when the menu board is updated. It could also upload a new photo every so many minutes/hours ... the trick would be to pick an interval that is frequent enough to be up-to-date but not so frequent that they much through their allocated bandwidth for the month from the frequent uploads.

Comment Re:Most IP cameras (Score 1) 263

An interesting approach but it has some issues for this situation:
1) The potential web camera is on a LAN with an IP that isn't web visible
2) The idea is not to have to dedicate any other computers to get the image up
3) The shop does not have a static IP address

All of these are addressable, but if the camera can push the image out, rather than someone reach in to pull it from the camera, it seems to be a much easier task.
(Or it would be if the Hikvision FTP was working as claimed in the manual.)

Comment Re:foscam/loftek (Score 1) 263

The end goal is to have a web-page that displays the image; FTP is just a way of getting the image to the page.
The Foscam they tried did have FTP build in but image quality wasn't up to snuff.

Thank you for mentioning the Zoneminder wiki/forums; that seems to be a good source of information from people having utilized the equipment they talk about.

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