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Submission + - 'Calibration error' changes GOP votes to Dem in Illinois (

Okian Warrior writes: Early voting in Illinois got off to a rocky start Monday, as votes being cast for Republican candidates were transformed into votes for Democrats.

Republican state representative candidate Jim Moynihan: “I tried to cast a vote for myself and instead it cast the vote for my opponent,” Moynihan said. “You could imagine my surprise as the same thing happened with a number of races when I tried to vote for a Republican and the machine registered a vote for a Democrat.”

The conservative website Illinois Review reported that “While using a touch screen voting machine in Schaumburg, Moynihan voted for several races on the ballot, only to find that whenever he voted for a Republican candidate, the machine registered the vote for a Democrat in the same race. He notified the election judge at his polling place and demonstrated that it continued to cast a vote for the opposing candidate’s party. Moynihan was eventually allowed to vote for Republican candidates, including his own race.

Comment Re:Signal triangulation = GPS (Score 5, Interesting) 128

Now that it's know that there is an error then any attacker would plan for alternatives.

The only way it really can be effective is when it's not active until really needed.

And there are still maps, alternative beacons, compasses (magnetic and gyro) and dead reckoning that can be used to find such targets for anyone out to perform an attack.

People were able to navigate even before GPS existed.

Submission + - Would redundancy and really long TTL have countered a lot of DDOS effects? ( 1

marmot7 writes: My primary takeaways from this article was that it's important to have redundancy (additional NS's) and that it's important to have a very long TTL when you're not actively updating something. Would the measures in this article have at least limited the damage of these attacks? The long TTL change alone would have made the cache likely covered the entire attack, right?

Submission + - Thieves Find New Ways to Bypass iOS Activation Lock (

UnderAttack writes: Apple's effort to make its product jailbreak prove are often justified with attempting to secure the product from theft. For example, the iOS activation lock appears to have caused a significant drop in the number of stolen iOS devices. But thieves are adapting, and finding ways to bypass activation lock with some nifty social engineering and phishing tricks. This article summarizes some of the tricks that thieves are currently employing.

Submission + - "Most serious" Linux privilege-escalation bug ever is under active exploit (

operator_error writes: Lurking in the kernel for nine years, flaw gives untrusted users unfettered root access.

By Dan Goodin — 10/20/2016

A serious vulnerability that has been present for nine years in virtually all versions of the Linux operating system is under active exploit, according to researchers who are advising users to install a patch as soon as possible.

While CVE-2016-5195, as the bug is cataloged, amounts to a mere privilege-escalation vulnerability rather than a more serious code-execution vulnerability, there are several reasons many researchers are taking it extremely seriously. For one thing, it's not hard to develop exploits that work reliably. For another, the flaw is located in a section of the Linux kernel that's a part of virtually every distribution of the open-source OS released for almost a decade. What's more, researchers have discovered attack code that indicates the vulnerability is being actively and maliciously exploited in the wild.

"It's probably the most serious Linux local privilege escalation ever," Dan Rosenberg, a senior researcher at Azimuth Security, told Ars. "The nature of the vulnerability lends itself to extremely reliable exploitation. This vulnerability has been present for nine years, which is an extremely long period of time."

The underlying bug was patched this week by the maintainers of the official Linux kernel. Downstream distributors are in the process of releasing updates that incorporate the fix. Red Hat has classified the vulnerability as "important."

Submission + - Anti-Vaccination Nurses in Australia Face Punishment writes: MedicalExpress reports that nurses and midwives promoting anti-vaccination messages in Australia could face punishment including being slapped with a caution and having their ability to practise medicine restricted. Serious cases could be referred to an industry tribunal, where practitioners could face harsher penalties such as having their registration suspended or cancelled. The Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia released the vaccination standards in response to what it described as a small number of nurses and midwives promoting anti-vaccination via social media. The statement also urges members of the public to report nurses or midwives promoting anti-vaccination. Promoting false, misleading or deceptive information is an offence under national law and is prosecutable by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency. “The board will consider whether the nurse or midwife has breached their professional obligations and will treat these matters seriously,” the statement said. However Dr. Hannah Dahlen, a professor of midwifery at the University of Western Sydney and the spokeswoman for the Australian College of Midwives, worries the crackdown may push people with anti-vaccination views further underground. “The worry is the confirmation bias that can occur, because people might say: ‘There you go, this is proof that you can’t even have an alternative opinion.’ It might in fact just give people more fuel for their belief systems.”

Submission + - Soros-linked corporation supplies voting machines to 16 States (

mi writes: Remember, how suspicious (and wrong!) it was for Diebold, whose management openly supported Bush, to be supplying voting machines? We even discussed it here over the years...

Well, a Soros-linked company from the UK is supplying 16 States with voting hardware this year. Will there be a comparable amount of suspicion?

Submission + - RIP, David Bunnell, founder of more major computer magazines than anyone (

harrymcc writes: David Bunnell has passed away. He stumbled into a job at PC pioneer MITS in the 1970s and went on to create the first PC magazine and first PC conference--and, later on, PC Magazine, PC World, Macworld, and Macworld Expo. He was a remarkable guy on multiple fronts, and I shared some thoughts about why he mattered so much at Fast Company.

Submission + - How the Web Became Unreadable (

mirandakatz writes: If you've found yourself squinting at your computer and wondering if your eyesight is starting to go, fear not: you're probably just suffering from a design trend. As computer screens have achieved higher resolution, web design has trended toward paler, lighter-weight type that often doesn't meet accessibility requirements. At Backchannel, web developer Kevin Marks breaks down the history of this trend, and offers an impassioned plea for designers to go back to the typographic principles of print: keeping type black, and varying weight and font instead of grayness.

Submission + - Apple refused to join Open Compute Project, so the entire networking team quit (

mattydread23 writes: Great story about the Open Compute Project from Business Insider's Julie Bort here, including this fun tidbit: "[Apple's networking] team was responsible for building a network at Apple that was so reliable, it never goes down. Not rarely. Never....Building a 100% reliable network to meet Apple's exacting standards was no easy task. So, instead of going it alone under Apple's secrecy, the Apple networking team wanted to participate in the revolution, contributing and receiving help. But when the Apple team asked to join OCP, Apple said 'no.' 'The whole team quit the same week,' this person told us."

Submission + - Democrat Operatives Caused Violence at Trump Rallies, Framed Sanders Supporters ( 15

Xenographic writes: A new video has come out detailing how Democratic operatives created violence at Trump rallies. You may remember that they then framed Sanders supporters for those protests. This video is notable because one of the operatives, Zulema Rodriguez, can be identified in videos of the Arizona protests at 17:35 in this independent video as well as at 10:30 in the first video link. Furthermore, you look at the FEC records of disbursements to her and see that she was paid by Finally, this again can be corroborated with the Wikileaks dump, specifically this email. For those too lazy to browse all the links, you can see Zulema's appearance in both videos in this image and note that it's the same person down to the tiny mole on her chest.

Submission + - VeraCrypt Security Audit Reveals Many Flaws, Some Already Patched ( 1

Orome1 writes: VeraCrypt, the free, open source disk encryption software based on TrueCrypt, has been audited by experts from cybersecurity company Quarkslab. The researchers found 8 critical, 3 medium, and 15 low-severity vulnerabilities, and some of them have already been addressed in version 1.19 of the software, which was released on the same day as the audit report.

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