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Submission + - Google Chrome To Make Certificate Transparency Mandatory In 2017 (thestack.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Google Chrome will make certificate transparency obligatory for domains issued from October 2017. The announcement, by Google software engineer Ryan Sleevi, makes clear that the Chrome team will extend all necessary help to certificating authorities to prepare them for compliance in the next twelve months. 'Although the date is a year away, we encourage any participants that wish to have their use cases addressed to bring them forward as soon as possible during the next three months. This will ensure that the IETF, the CA/Browser Forum, and the broader community at large have ample time to discuss the challenges that may be faced, and find appropriate solutions for them.' The Certificate Transparency open framework, which has been criticized over privacy aspects, uses logs to which information can only be appended (not removed or altered) to provide an authentic chain of trust which is capable of detecting compromised certificates in hours rather than the days, weeks or months involved in traditional propagation.

Submission + - London's Streets To Get Free 1Gbps Wi-Fi, Mobile Charging And Phone Calls 1

Mickeycaskill writes: BT is to replace hundreds of phone boxes across London and replace them with ‘Links’ – modern kiosks that offer free, ad-supported phone calls, 1Gbps Wi-Fi, mobile charging and sensors that can support smart city applications.

The first kiosks will start to appear on the capital’s streets in early 2017, offering the fastest free public Wi-Fi service available. Each Link can support hundreds of users and also offers free mobile and landline calls to UK numbers.

An inbuilt Android tablet offers free local information and directions, and two 55-inch HD displays will serve adverts, public service announcements and community news. Each Link will be equipped with sensors that could monitor air and noise pollution, temperature, traffic and other urban metrics, allowing organisations and local councils to build smart city applications based on the Internet of Things (IoT).

Although its likely that not all payphones will be replaced with kiosks, BT has promised not a single iconic red phone box will be taken off the streets for what it calls the latest 'evolution' of the payphone.

Submission + - Twitter Plans To Cut About 300 Jobs As Soon As This Week, Says Report (bloomberg.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Twitter Inc. is planning widespread job cuts, to be announced as soon as this week, according to people familiar with the matter. The company may cut about 8 percent of the workforce, or about 300 people, the same percentage it did last year when co-founder Jack Dorsey took over as chief executive officer, the people said. Planning for the cuts is still fluid and the number could change, they added. An announcement about the job reductions may come before Twitter releases third-quarter earnings on Thursday, one of the people said. Twitter, which loses money, is trying to control spending as sales growth slows. The company recently hired bankers to explore a sale, but the companies that had expressed interest in bidding — Salesforce.com Inc., The Walt Disney Co. and Alphabet Inc. — later backed out from the process. Twitter’s losses and 40 percent fall in its share price the past 12 months have made it more difficult for the company to pay its engineers with stock. That has made it harder for Twitter to compete for talent with giant rivals like Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc. Reducing employee numbers would relieve some of this pressure.

Comment Re:resistance is futile (Score 4, Informative) 195

Demonstrably bullshit, and exactly the kind of falsehood that the Leave campaign was spouting during the UK's referendum - at least in the way that you are positing. Check out the latest news on the ongoing negotiations over the EU-Canada trade deal that is currently on the rocks because *three* regions of one EU member state (Belgium) are objecting to the deal. Everyone else - all the other 27 members of the EU and Canada want to go ahead, but can't because of those three provinces, and the terms of the deal (5MB PDF) are entirely public knowledge - unlike things like TPP and TTIP where the US is involved and insists on secrecy.

The real irony of the situation (and the reason for my caveat); the three regions that are blocking the deal are Wallonia, the French speaking region of Flanders... and Brussels itself (albeit as a province of Belgium rather than as the EU).

Submission + - Alibaba Founder To Chinese Government: Use Big Data To Stop Criminals (bloomberg.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Chinese billionaire Jack Ma proposed that the nation’s top security bureau use big data to prevent crime, endorsing the country’s nascent effort to build unparalleled online surveillance of its billion-plus people. China’s data capabilities are virtually unrivaled among its global peers, and policing cannot happen without the ability to analyze information on its citizens, the co-founder of Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. said in a speech published Saturday by the agency that polices crime and runs the courts. Ma’s stance resonates with that of China’s ruling body, which is establishing a system to collect and parse information on citizens in a country where minimal safeguards exist for privacy. “Bad guys in a movie are identifiable at first glance, but how can the ones in real life be found?” Ma said in his speech, which was posted on the official WeChat account of the Commission for Political and Legal Affairs. “In the age of big data, we need to remember that our legal and security system with millions of members will also face change.” In his speech, Ma stuck mainly to the issue of crime prevention. In Alibaba’s hometown of Hangzhou alone, the number of surveillance cameras may already surpass that of New York’s, Ma said. Humans can’t handle the sheer amount of data amassed, which is where artificial intelligence comes in, he added. “The future legal and security system cannot be separated from the internet and big data,” Ma said. Ma’s speech also highlights the delicate relationship between Chinese web companies and the government. The ruling party has designated internet industry leaders as key targets for outreach, with President Xi Jinping saying in May last year that technology leaders should “demonstrate positive energy in purifying cyberspace.”

Submission + - Study Finds Little Lies Lead To Bigger Ones (go.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Telling little fibs leads down a slippery slope to bigger lies — and our brains adapt to escalating dishonesty, which makes deceit easier, a new study shows. Neuroscientists at the University College London's Affective Brain Lab put 80 people in scenarios where they could repeatedly lie and get paid more based on the magnitude of their lies. They said they were the first to demonstrate empirically that people's lies grow bolder the more they fib. The researchers then used brain scans to show that our mind's emotional hot spot — the amygdala — becomes desensitized or used to the growing dishonesty, according to a study published online Monday in the journal Nature Neuroscience. And during this lying, brain scans that show blood supply and activity at the amygdala decrease with increasing lies, said study co-author and lab director Tali Sharot. "The more we lie, the less likely we are to have an emotional response" — say, shame or guilt — "that accompanies it," Sharot said. Garrett said he suspects similar escalation factors happen in the "real world," which would include politics, infidelity and cheating, but he cautioned that this study was done in a controlled lab setting so more research would be needed to apply it to other situations. The study found that there is a segment of people who don't lie and don't escalate lies, but Sharot and Garrett weren't able to determine how rare those honest people are. It also found that people lie more when it benefits both them and someone else than when they just profit alone.

Submission + - Electronic surveillance up 500% in D.C.area since 2011, almost all sealed cases (washingtonpost.com)

schwit1 writes: Secret law enforcement requests to conduct electronic surveillance in domestic criminal cases have surged in federal courts for Northern Virginia and the District, but only one in a thousand of the applications ever becomes public, newly released data show.

The bare-bones release by the courts leaves unanswered how long, in what ways and for what crimes federal investigators tracked individuals’ data and whether long-running investigations result in charges.

In Northern Virginia, electronic surveillance requests increased 500 percent in the past five years, from 305 in 2011 to a pace set to pass 1,800 this year.

Only one of the total 4,113 applications in those five years had been unsealed as of late July, according to information from the Alexandria division of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, which covers northern Virginia.

Submission + - New York Times Buys The Wirecutter For $30 Million (recode.net)

An anonymous reader writes: The New York Times is buying The Wirecutter, a five-year-old online consumer guide. The Times will pay more than $30 million, including retention bonuses and other payouts, for the startup, according to people familiar with the transaction. Brian Lam, a former editor at Gawker Media’s Gizmodo, founded The Wirecutter in 2011, and has self-funded the company’s growth. The Wirecutter provides recommendations for electronics and other gadgets that are both obsessively researched and simply presented. The Wirecutter also owns The Sweethome, which takes the same approach for home appliances and other gear.

Submission + - GPS Jammed Near the Kremlin (yahoo.com)

stevegee58 writes: Russians have been noticing that their GPS doesn't work in Moscow near the Kremlin. Everyone from taxi drivers to Pokemon Go players suddenly notice that they're transported 18 miles away at the airport when they near the Kremlin.
While this may be an annoyance to the public it seems like a reasonable countermeasure to potential terrorist threats. Is it only a matter of time before other vulnerable sites such as the White House or the Capitol in Washington start doing the same?

Submission + - "Most serious" Linux privilege-escalation bug ever is under active exploit (arstechnica.com)

operator_error writes: Lurking in the kernel for nine years, flaw gives untrusted users unfettered root access.

By Dan Goodin — 10/20/2016

A serious vulnerability that has been present for nine years in virtually all versions of the Linux operating system is under active exploit, according to researchers who are advising users to install a patch as soon as possible.

While CVE-2016-5195, as the bug is cataloged, amounts to a mere privilege-escalation vulnerability rather than a more serious code-execution vulnerability, there are several reasons many researchers are taking it extremely seriously. For one thing, it's not hard to develop exploits that work reliably. For another, the flaw is located in a section of the Linux kernel that's a part of virtually every distribution of the open-source OS released for almost a decade. What's more, researchers have discovered attack code that indicates the vulnerability is being actively and maliciously exploited in the wild.

"It's probably the most serious Linux local privilege escalation ever," Dan Rosenberg, a senior researcher at Azimuth Security, told Ars. "The nature of the vulnerability lends itself to extremely reliable exploitation. This vulnerability has been present for nine years, which is an extremely long period of time."

The underlying bug was patched this week by the maintainers of the official Linux kernel. Downstream distributors are in the process of releasing updates that incorporate the fix. Red Hat has classified the vulnerability as "important."

Submission + - Anti-Vaccination Nurses in Australia Face Punishment

HughPickens.com writes: MedicalExpress reports that nurses and midwives promoting anti-vaccination messages in Australia could face punishment including being slapped with a caution and having their ability to practise medicine restricted. Serious cases could be referred to an industry tribunal, where practitioners could face harsher penalties such as having their registration suspended or cancelled. The Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia released the vaccination standards in response to what it described as a small number of nurses and midwives promoting anti-vaccination via social media. The statement also urges members of the public to report nurses or midwives promoting anti-vaccination. Promoting false, misleading or deceptive information is an offence under national law and is prosecutable by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency. “The board will consider whether the nurse or midwife has breached their professional obligations and will treat these matters seriously,” the statement said. However Dr. Hannah Dahlen, a professor of midwifery at the University of Western Sydney and the spokeswoman for the Australian College of Midwives, worries the crackdown may push people with anti-vaccination views further underground. “The worry is the confirmation bias that can occur, because people might say: ‘There you go, this is proof that you can’t even have an alternative opinion.’ It might in fact just give people more fuel for their belief systems.”

Submission + - iPhone 7 Plus Qualcomm LTE Modem Significantly Outperforms Intel LTE Modem (macrumors.com)

An anonymous reader writes: With the iPhone 7 and the iPhone 7 Plus, Apple elected to use LTE modems from two different sources, Qualcomm and Intel. The A1778 and A1784 iPhone models use a GSM-only Intel XMM7360 modem while the A1660 and 1661 iPhone models use a GSM/CDMA-compatible Qualcomm MDM9645M modem. Apple's decision has already caused some disappointment among customers because the GSM-only Intel modem is not compatible with as many carrier networks as the GSM/CDMA Qualcomm modem, and now independent testing conducted by Cellular Insights suggests there are some significant performance differences between the two modems, with the Qualcomm modem outperforming the Intel modem. Using an RS TS7124 RF Shielded Box, two RS CMW500, one RS CMWC controller, and four Vivaldi antennas, Cellular Insights created a setup to simulate LTE performance at different distances from a cellular tower using two iPhone 7 Plus devices, one with an Intel modem and one with a Qualcomm modem. The goal of the test was to measure the highest achievable LTE throughput starting at a Reference Signal Received Quality of -85dBm (a strong signal) and gradually reducing the power level to simulate moving away from a cellular tower where signal is weaker. Three LTE bands were tested: Band 12, Band 4 (the most common band in North America), and Band 7. In all three tests, both the iPhone 7 Plus models offered similar performance in ideal conditions, but as power levels decreased, Cellular Insights saw "unexplainable sharp dips in performance" in the Intel modem, finding a gap "north of 30%" in favor of the Qualcomm iPhone 7 Plus. In the charts, the Qualcomm modem maintains noticeably higher throughput speeds than the Intel modem as signal strength decreases. According to Cellular Insights, in every single test, the iPhone 7 Plus with a Qualcomm modem "had a significant performance edge" over the iPhone 7 Plus with an Intel modem.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Secure methods for baby monitoring

Szeraax writes: Big time nerd, first time father (well, first and second since I just had twins!). Ideally, I can track temperature and heart rate of my new family members without causing a security nightmare on my home network. I see lots of arm bands from China that claim security, but even their documentation pictures are pure chinese screen shots. That makes me immediately leary of the device. I can use a private WLAN on my router for the devices if needed. I can connect via bluetooth on phone or computer. Is my best bet to check vitals manually and plot results in LibreOffice calc? Are there monitoring devices that totally avoid the cloud rush of today? Should I just not even waste my time with the data?

Slashdot, what advice do you have for me?

Submission + - First New US Nuclear Reactor In 20 Years Goes Live (cnn.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Tennessee Valley Authority is celebrating an event 43 years in the making: the completion of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant. In 1973, the TVA, one of the nation's largest public power providers, began building two reactors that combined promised to generate enough power to light up 1.3 million homes. The first reactor, delayed by design flaws, eventually went live in 1996. Now, after billions of dollars in budget overruns, the second reactor has finally started sending power to homes and businesses. Standing in front of both reactors Wednesday, TVA President Bill Johnson said Watts Bar 2, the first US reactor to enter commercial operation in 20 years, would offer clean, cheap and reliable energy to residents of several southern states for at least another generation. Before Watts Bar 2, the last time an American reactor had fired up was in 1996. It was Watts Bar 1--and according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, it cost $6.8 billion, far greater than the original price tag at $370 million. In the 2000s, some American power companies, faced with growing environmental regulations, eyed nuclear power again as a top alternative to fossil fuels such as coal and oil. A handful of companies, taking advantage of federal loan guarantees from the Bush administration, revived nuclear reactor proposals in a period now known as the so-called "nuclear renaissance." Eventually, nuclear regulators started to green light new reactors, including ones in Georgia and South Carolina. In 2007, the TVA resumed construction on Watts Bar 2, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency. The TVA originally said it would take five years to complete. The TVA, which today serves seven different southern states, relies on nuclear power to light up approximately 4.5 million homes. Watts Bar 2, the company's seventh operating reactor, reaffirms its commitment to nukes for at least four more decades, Johnson said Wednesday. In the end, TVA required more than five years to build the project. The final cost, far exceeding its initial budget, stood at $4.7 billion.

Submission + - KickassTorrents Lawyer: 'Torrent Sites Do Not Violate Criminal Copyright Laws' (arstechnica.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: Lawyers representing Artem Vaulin have filed their formal legal response to prosecutors’ allegations of conspiracy to commit criminal copyright infringement, among other charges. Vaulin is the alleged head of KickassTorrents (KAT). KAT was the world’s largest BitTorrent distribution site before it was shuttered by authorities earlier this year. Vaulin was arrested in Poland, where he now awaits extradition to the United States. “Vaulin is charged with running today’s most visited illegal file-sharing website, responsible for unlawfully distributing well over $1 billion of copyrighted materials,” Assistant Attorney General Leslie Caldwell said in a July 2016 statement. The defense’s new 22-page court filing largely relies on the argument that there is no such thing as secondary criminal copyright infringement. While secondary copyright infringement as a matter of civil liability was upheld by the Supreme Court in MGM v. Grokster in 2005, Vaulin and his associates have been charged criminally. “The fundamental flaw in the government’s untenable theory of prosecution is that there is no copyright protection for such torrent file instructions and addresses,” [the brief's author, Ira Rothken,] argued in his Monday motion to dismiss the charges against Vaulin. “Therefore, given the lack of direct willful copyright infringement, torrent sites do not violate criminal copyright laws.” “The extradition procedures have formally been started by the US in Poland,” Rothken told Ars. “We are in a submissions or briefing period, and our Polish team is opposing extradition.” Rothken also said that he has yet to be allowed to meet or speak directly with his client. For now, Rothken has been required to communicate via his Polish counterpart, Alek Kowzan. “Maybe they are afraid that Artem's extradition defense will be enhanced if American lawyers can assist in defending against the US extradition,” Rothken added. No hearings before US District Judge John Z. Lee have been set.

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