Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. ×

Submission + - Seizures and searches INSIDE the White House

shanen writes: What would do if your boss suddenly told you to give him ALL of your phones? Your boss wants to check if you have done anything suspicious by studying EVERYONE you've spoken to. Lawyers in attendance, and obvious that refusal = instant termination of your employment.

Technology minus privacy = ?

Now imagine you're working in the White House. It's already reality.

The report in the video claims that Sean Spicer brought all of the flunkies in the press section into a room and ordered them to dump all their phones on the table for immediate examination. The report also says the supposedly nonexistent "anonymous sources" do exist and are much higher (and everywhere)...

However, I think the video mostly shows how bad the mass media is, if you regard Morning Joe as some kind of journalist. Obviously the point of the story is that the person who is MOST afraid for his job right now is Sean Spicer and he is trying to convince Herr #PresidentTweety not to fire him. In a sane scenario, he would understand that this kind of craziness guarantees his termination. Even allowing for the crazy environment, I think Spicer might be sane and has realized he's already tired of the job and WANTS to be fired.

Submission + - Lessons from Canada's scientific resistance (thebulletin.org)

Lasrick writes: Andrew Nikiforuk, a contributing editor of The Tyee and author of Slick Water, has a smart piece outlining what the United States science community can do to combat expected attacks from the Trump administration on federal funding for research projects that examine the environmental impacts of industries such as mining and oil drilling. Nikiforuk seeks lessons from the years when the Canadian government, led by then-Prime Minister Stephen Harper, systematically reduced the capacity of publicly funded federal science to monitor the impacts of air, water, and carbon pollution from the country’s aggressive resource industries—by cutting budgets and firing staff. Great read.

Submission + - SpaceX plans manned moon fly-around in 2018 (orlandosentinel.com)

b0bby writes: SpaceX is planning to fly two private citizens on a trip around the moon late 2018. “They have already paid a significant deposit to do a moon mission,” SpaceX said in a news release Monday. “Once operational Crew Dragon missions are underway for NASA, SpaceX will launch the private mission on a journey to circumnavigate the moon and return to Earth.”

Submission + - California Law Enforcement Union Sues To Block Police Accountability (techdirt.com)

schwit1 writes: Because there's just not enough opacity shrouding police misconduct and not enough slanting of the criminal justice system against defendants, California police unions have decided to get involved in a judicial dispute over lists of law enforcement officers whose half of "our word against yours" isn't quite as bulletproof as is normally assumed.

A Los Angeles sheriff is trying to do the right thing, but he's running into opposition from his own supposed "representatives."

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department has collected the names of about 300 deputies who have a history of past misconduct — such as domestic violence, theft, bribery and brutality — that could damage their credibility if they testify in court.

Sheriff Jim McDonnell wants to send the names to prosecutors, who can decide whether to add them to an internal database that tracks problem officers in case the information needs to be disclosed to defendants in criminal trials.

I don't imagine prosecutors are exactly thrilled to be the recipient of information that damages the credibility of their favorite witnesses, but it's probably better than having your witness destroyed in open court by a defense attorney. But prosecutors may never see this information, thanks to the police union's belief that officers shouldn't be held accountable for anything.

Submission + - When ISP copyright infringement notifications go wrong

Andy Smith writes: Yesterday I received an email from my ISP telling me that I had illegally downloaded an animated film called Cubo and the Two Strings. I'd never heard of the film and hadn't downloaded it. The accusation came from a government-approved group called Get It Right From a Genuine Site. I contacted that group and was directed to their FAQ. Worryingly, there's no way to correct a false report. The entire FAQ is written from the position that either you, or someone on your network, definitely downloaded what you're accused of downloading. Their advice to avoid any problems with your ISP is simply to not download anything illegally again. But if they can get it wrong once, then surely they can get it wrong again. How widespread is this problem? What safeguards are in place to ensure that people aren't falsely accused? Why has the government allowed this scheme to operate without the accused having some right to defend themselves?

Submission + - Canada's Top Mountie Issues Blistering Memo On IT Failures

Freshly Exhumed writes: RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson has levelled a blistering memo obtained by the CBC on how critical IT failures have increased by 129 per cent since Shared Services Canada took over tech support for the entire government five years ago. Not only that, the memo says, the duration of each outage has increased by 98 per cent. "Its 'one size fits all' IT shared services model has negatively impacted police operations, public and officer safety and the integrity of the criminal justice system," reads the memo. A list of specific incidents includes an 11-hour network computer outage on Jan. 18 that downed every Mountie's BlackBerry, affected dispatching, and prevented the RCMP and 240 other police forces from accessing the Canadian Police Information Centre database.

Submission + - Google Pushes Encrypted Email System Out Into the World

Trailrunner7 writes: People have been trying to find a replacement for PGP almost since the day it was released, and with limited success. Encrypted email is still difficult to use and painful to implement in most cases, but Google has just released a Chrome plugin designed to address those problems.

The new E2EMail extension doesn’t turn a user’s Gmail inbox into an encrypted mail client. Rather, it is a replacement that gives users a separate inbox for encrypted messages. The system is built on Google’s end-to-end encryption library, and the company has released E2EMail as an open-source project.

Submission + - Why Don't Mobile OSs offer a Kill Code? 1

gordo3000 writes: Given all the recent headlines about border patrol getting up close and personal with phones, I've been wondering why phone manufacturers don't offer a second emergency pin that you can enter and it wipes all private information on the phone?

In theory, it should be pretty easy to just input a different pin (or unlock pattern) that opens up a factory reset screen on the phone and in the background begins deleting all personal information. I'd expect that same code could also lock out the USB port until it is finished deleting the data, to help prevent many of the tools they now have to copy out everything on your phone.

This nicely prevents you from having to back up and wipe your phone before every trip but leaves you with a safety measure if you get harassed at the border.

So slashdot, what say you?

Submission + - Science Fiction Actor Bill Paxton Dies At Age 61 (ew.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Bill Paxton starred in a surprising number of cult science fiction favorites. After playing the blue-haired punk rocker who confronts The Terminator , and the mean older brother in John Hughes nerd comedy Weird Science, Paton was cast as private Hudson in Aliens , the soldier who at one point wails "Game over, man!" Sigourney Weaver called his performance "brilliant', while James Cameron said Paxton's character released some of the audience's tension. "Bill made up different dialogue on every take, and he was yelling it over a machine gun, so none of it actually recorded."

Paxton also appeared in Predator 2, Apollo 13, Twister, and James Cameron's Titanic. Most recently provided the voice of the executive Kahn in Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare and had a recurring role as Hydra agent John Garrett in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D

Submission + - New Nokia 3310 Arrives Alongside Three Android Smartphones

Mickeycaskill writes: Nokia has officially brought back the iconic 3310 handset via HMD Global, only it’s with a modern twist on a retro handset.

Rather than simply re-release the old 3310 in order to tap into a vein of tech nostalgia, the 3310 has a few twists, notably 2.4inch QVGA display, a 2MP rear camera and Nokia’s Series 30+ software, as well as a microSD slot and micro USB port for charging the mobile.

Support for 2G connectivity is present but no Wi-Fi or GPS, so one could call it a semi-smartphone. However it does promise 22 hours of talk-time battery life and a lengthy month work of power when on standby.

Available in matt grey and blue, and glossy red and yellow colours, the 3310 will sell for €49 (around £40) and will go on sale in the second quarter of 2017.

Submission + - New auto-destruct system to increase launch rate (spaceflightnow.com)

schwit1 writes: A new auto-destruct system operating by computer, using GPS, and installed on each rocket should allow the launch rate in Florida to ramp up significantly.

Up until now it took several days to reconfigure the ground-based radar facilities. This system, first used on the most recent Falcon 9 launch, does not require this. It also involves fewer people to operate it. They expect that they will soon be able to launch up to 48 missions per year, some on the same day.

Slashdot Top Deals

You have mail.

Working...