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Comment Re:Not the whole story? (Score 2) 157

ASLR is not memory protection. Breaking ASLR does not give read nor write access to any memory that the process did not already have. ASLR was introduced to help mitigate a bunch of buffer overflow attacks, by not having a 'predicatable' address that the attacker could branch to to execute his malicious code.

So exactly HOW are you going to intercept that password, using a technique that would not be possible if ASLR was not broken?

Comment Re:Please wait until after you're screwed. (Score 1) 69

That might actually mean something if Illinois law meant anything in FEDERAL court (where this case was). Federal law is:

For an injury-in-fact to be "concrete", it must be "real, and not abstract" and that a "bare procedural violation" under a federal statute, "divorced from any concrete harm" that "may result in no harm" would not "satisfy the injury-in-fact requirement"

Comment Re:New York (Score 1) 69

You keep repeating the same thing, and it is completely wrong. Direct quote from federal law:

For an injury-in-fact to be "concrete", it must be "real, and not abstract" and that a "bare procedural violation" under a federal statute, "divorced from any concrete harm" that "may result in no harm" would not "satisfy the injury-in-fact requirement" Id. at 1549

In other words, merely breaking the law (the bare procedural violation), in the absense of any REAL harm, does not entitle you to sue.

Comment Re:New York (Score 1) 69

First, you seem to be confusing civil and criminal law. In CRIMINAL law all that needs to be shown is a violation of the law. Criminal law is prosecuted by the state, not individuals. In CIVIL law you have to show you were harmed, always. You have no standing to sue otherwise.

For your ADA example, there are only two possibilities: the guy is himself harmed by ADA violations (ie he has a disability and has been denied access), or he is actiing on behalf of someone else who is being harmed (n that case, the someone else would be the one receiving the damages). In either case, harm must be demonstrated. In this case, not only was no harm demonstrated (to anyone), the plaintiffs don't even try to CLAIM there was harm.

Comment Re:New York (Score 1) 69

Your example makes no sense, because in the case of the security deposit you ARE harmed (they have your money).

Your ridiculous interpretation of the law would mean that I could sue you, and be entitled to an award, because I saw you exceeding the speed limit. Now, if your speeding harmed me (like you crashed into me), THEN I could sue you, but I sure as hell can't sue you just because I think you broke some law.

Comment Re:sounds like a contract dispute (Score 1) 69

Where are people getting the idea they got paid? They are game PLAYERS who used a feature of the game to make personalized avatars. Even the plaintiffs don't make the claim that the scans ever were disseminated. Their entire case is based on speculation that the data is stored 'somewhere' and could 'fall into the wrong hands'. There is no claim that any of that actually happened.

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