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Comment Re:Why not just a single font? (Score 1) 175

why is there not a single "Noto serif" font that combines them all? Or how else is one supposed to configure the browser now to give access to all those symbols?

A single font for all of them, as has been mentioned above, is possible but would be over 400MB, which is a problem for some of us.
Browsers will search other available fonts for a code point that's not in the current font, so you can install a collection of subset fonts that includes all the characters you are likely to need.

Comment Re:Professional level audio experience (Score 1) 316

Try Ardour:

Ardour is a very capable DAW, but by itself it's not "A viable alternative to osx (and ms) for multimedia work". AV Linux is, however, a snapshot of Debian testing with numerous setup tweaks and a real time kernel that does make a usable OS for audio work. And includes Ardour, of course.

(if you're interested, watch the AV Linux forum., A new release is imminent...)

Comment Re:futile (Score 1) 146

Bad form to reply to my own post, I know, but I've just realised this is not the thing that Leadsom proposed, which was the "movie-style" rating system reported elsewhere. Apologies for spreading confusion and misinformation.

Not that either proposal has much merit, of course, for similar reasons.

Comment Re:futile (Score 2) 146

Panic not, it won't happen.

This is the brainchild of Andrea Leadsom, one of the two final contestants for leadership of the Tory party (and hence the post of PM until the next general election). According to a comment on this story on The Register, she already has a reputation around Westminster as a "self-serving simpleton". Theresa May (the other contestant) is generally expected to win.

Comment Re: why is this needed? (Score 1) 130

The best way to use keyboard input is not just to look at the characters sent but to measure the keystroke timing, preferably in microseconds or shorter, and use only the lower order bits of the time values. It still requires care to make there there isn't bias in the times when keyboard interrupts are allowed to happen, but it can potentially generate a lot more entropy.

It's still MUCH slower than background noise from a microphone or thermal noise from a resistor, but at least it uses hardware that's already there.

Comment Re: regulation (Score 1) 401

Not the lipo batteries, but a drone will have other components harder than bone. Even if the frame is plastic or carbon fibre, the motors will be metal and I'd expect them to do more damage to a turbine blade than bird bones. And there will be at least four of them.

As for the explosion of the battery, in an environment where jet fuel is being burned, that's just a little extra heat and flame.

Comment Re:Audacity & Ubuntu Studio (Score 1) 264

Ardour does all that. All your effects are done in real time as you play the sound. 32 or more tracks of them (Ardour has no actual limit) Easy editing, seamless joins, full automation on every parameter if you want it. I've used both Ardour and Audacity: there is no comparison. I use Audacity for quick trimming and normalization of stereo material recorded on a pocket sound recorder, but anything more complicated gets done on Ardour.

You can argue about Ardour vs. Pro Tools, but basically they do the same kind of job. Many audio professionals use Pro Tools not because it's better than anything else but simply because if you ever send your work to another studio or get another engineer to work in your studio, that's what they'll expect.

Incidentally, Ardour also works on OSX and Windows now, but it's better supported (because more widely used so far) on Linux.

Comment Re:Doubt you were in "deep". (Score 1) 264

You have no idea about audio production on Linux if you think PulseAudio has anything to do with it.

Content creation whether, audio, video, 2D, 3D, or other at the professional level generally requires the ability to jump among a variety of software packages, plugins, and occasional one-jobbers.

If there's a limitation with Linux, that's it. Good quality software and hardware are available, but there's far less choice than there is for Windows, which is obviously supported by every manufacturer.

Comment Re:The future looks good. (Score 3, Interesting) 264

Linux would be good for this, but most of the mainstream desktop UIs (KDE, Gnome, etc.) tend to be very slow and porky, so it really would take a separate desktop environment that is lightweight in order to allow Linux to be useful for an audio or audio/video platform.

It also needs a few system tweaks and, for best latency, a low-latency or even realtime kernel.

AV Linux is a Debian system so tweaked, making it very easy to use. It also comes with XFCE, which is more than enough desktop functionality to do audio and video work and llightweight enough not to get in the way.

It is better, whichever OS you use, to have a dedicated system for realtime work like multitrack audio recording and mixing. Real recording studios don't do their accounts and email on the studio computer. Not while it's being used in a recording session, anyway...

Comment Re:The future looks good. (Score 3, Interesting) 264

Most Linux based audio production setups don't go anywhere near PulseAudio. ALSA isn't a problem.

For audio production you usually need JACK which lets makes audio and MIDI connections between audio programs and I/O. And Ardour is getting to be a polished and very capable product now. Neither has any application on a normal desktop system, but for audio work they are ideal.

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