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Submission + - U of Calif. San Diego chancellor is a director of outsoucer hired by UCSF (computerworld.com)

dcblogs writes: The offshore outsourcing planned at the University of California's San Francisco (UCSF) campus is following a standard playbook. The affected employees expect to train their replacements as a condition of severance. Their jobs will soon be in India and they'll be out of work. But the chancellor of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), Pradeep K. Khosla, may still be getting compensated by HCL Infosystems. It is one of the units of India-based HCL, the IT services contractor hired by the university. Khosla is an independent and non-executive director on the HCL Infosystems board of directors. Khosla has reported his HCL compensation to the university at $12,000 last year for 56 hours of total time served. He also earns $12,000 from Infosys Science Foundation as chair of the engineering and computer science jury, according to the compensation report. When asked if the university's contract with HCL creates a conflict for Khosla, a UCSD spokeswoman,replied: "The contract was negotiated between UCSF and HCL; it did not involve Chancellor Pradeep Khosla in any way, nor was it discussed at any HCL meeting that Chancellor Khosla attended." But the HCL contract can be leveraged by any UC campus. The "HCL agreement is UC-wide," according to notes from the university's system-wide Architecture Committee. "Other CIOs looking at UCSF experience before other folks dip in. Wait for a year before jumping in with HCL." Another issue for the university may be having an association generally with the offshore outsourcing industry, which works at displacing U.S. IT workers, including computer science grads of institutions such as the University of California.

Submission + - Google helps Spanish-speaking Americans register to vote (betanews.com)

BrianFagioli writes: Here's the thing though. If you are old enough to vote, but haven't registered, it really doesn't matter who you support in the debate, and ultimately, the presidential election in November. Why? Because if you aren't allowed to cast a ballot, your voice isn't really being heard. Luckily, registering to vote is easy, and Google has been aiming to make it even easier. Today, it expands its initiative to Spanish-speaking Americans. Remember folks, English is not the official language of the USA. Actually, there is no official language.

Submission + - OpenSSL Patches Bug Created by Patch From Last Week

Trailrunner7 writes: Four days after releasing a new version that fixed several security problems, the OpenSSL maintainers have rushed out another version that patches a vulnerability introduced in version 1.1.0a on Sept. 22.

Last week, OpenSSL patched 14 security flaws in various versions of the software, which is the most widely used toolkit for implementing TLS. One of the vulnerabilities fixed in that release was a low-risk bug related to memory allocation in tls_get_message_header.

The problem is, the patch for that vulnerability actually introduced a separate critical bug. The new vulnerability, which is fixed in version 1.1.0b, only affected version 1.1.0a, but it can lead to arbitrary code execution.

Comment Re:Terminals in the 1950s? (Score 2) 342

Yes. This is a glaring anachronism. Terminals didn't take over until some time in the 70s. Even in the late 60s multi terminal computers weren't really stable. The predominant model was batch processing. Programs were written by hand, often onto specially ruled coding sheets, and carefully reviewed before being punched into cards, which were ultimately fed into computers. The results would be printed out to be reviewed hours later.

Submission + - US Dept. of Ed: English, History, and Civics Teachers Good Enough for CS Class

theodp writes: In A New Chapter for Computer Science Education, the U.S. Department of Education explained earlier this month that the federal STEM Education Act of 2015 'provides an unprecedented opportunity to fully leverage federal resources' to address large gaps in students’ participation in Advanced Placement (AP) computer science classes based on gender and race. "In three states," lamented the DOE, "not a single female student took the AP computer science exam" (that only 8 boys took the AP CS exam in those same 3 states was apparently not a concern). And the DOE has good news for those hoping to tap Title I and II funds for CS, but don't have any computer science teachers. "A background in math or science isn’t necessarily a requirement to teach CS," explains the Dept. of Ed, "as disciplines like English, history and civics can also provide a solid foundation for teaching CS concepts." So, is "good enough for CS class" the new "good enough for government work"?

Submission + - Kevo smart lock hacked

An anonymous reader writes: Security researchers at NewSky Security recently reported in their blog on how Kevo smart lock can be hacked. 3 kinds of attacks were performed: DOS, DOS via battery drain and Hijack + control the lock.

Submission + - Will Robot Cabs Unjam the Streets? (theatlantic.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Atlantic has a story with some video of a traffic simulator showing just how the roads can be jammed up by people looking for a place to park. (You can play with the simulator too.) This has been suspected for a long time by many traffic researchers and city planners, but the simulator shows just how quickly the roads jam up after just a few of the blocks fill up with parked cars. The good news is that autonomous cars don't need to park-- they just go give someone else a ride. They could change city life forever.

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