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Comment Re:Fighting it is evil (Score 1) 310

Cell phone repair is tricky, but not even approaching impossible. As a former electronics tech (about 35 years ago), I was able to disassemble, repair, and re-assemble my Galaxy S4. It really was not difficult and, with a service manual, would have been trivial. Soldering and de-soldering surface-mount devices and tools to do so are required, but those are hardly impossible to obtain.

More importantly, the law is more about letting independent servicers, who are likely more skilled than I, to have the information and parts to repair the devices.

The battery argument is pretty bogus. It takes no service information to get a battery to over-heat. A service manual only reduces the risk.

Comment Re:Turnabouts fair play (Score 4, Insightful) 68

If Apple wants Banks to cooperate by opening their payment network to iPhones , Apple must open up the iPhone NFC to mobile wallets from Banks. A competition commission cannot say its anti-competitive for incumbents to block Apple Pay but its not anti-competitive for Apple to not allow access to the NFC chip in an iPhone.

Apple's system explicitly collects NO extraneous information on transactions. Banks hate this as they had seen mobile device transactions as a chance to collect a lot of valuable data. Sellers also hoped to build added piles of marketing data that Apple Pay won't provide because its design simply does not have access to it..

Comment Re:Open primaries (Score 1) 136

California has open primaries and they generally seem to be working.

The result has been the election of more moderate and FAR more independent candidates. The are more moderate because the main-line party candidate (both parties) tend toward the extremes of their parties. More independent because the parties have poured vast resources into the main-line candidates and the moderates don't feel at all beholden to them, even though they generally host similar positions on most issues.

Comment Re:It'll never happen (Score 4, Interesting) 136

My state (California) voted in term limits many years ago and we have come to regret the unintended consequences. The problem is that 4-6 years is not long enough ot learn to deal with the entrenched interests. The result was that lobbyists, who are around much longer, became invaluable "helpers" to the large number of newly elected and inexperienced legislators and ended up effectively running the legislature. Their influence, always a concern, grew tremendously.

Now the term limits have been eased (also by popular vote) and it is hoped that this will help. We'll see in 5 or 6 years

Comment Mid-end? How can the middle by an end? (Score 4, Insightful) 23

I hate really stupid terms and mid-end is really stupid.

You have an array of products and the most expensive and least expensive are hi-end and low end. All the rest are not "end"s. Mid-class or mid-line would work, but let's not start using such an oxymoronic term as "mid-end".

Comment Re:A Master Password.... (Score 4, Interesting) 234

Calling anyone who disagrees, especially when they point out that you are wrong, a "shill" is just the same as any unsupported BS from a presidential candidate. Null content.

Several years ago I had the job of evaluating LastPass for $DAY_JOB. I tested it by capturing the data uploaded to the network and confirmed that it was AES encrypted using my password on my system and the data was all encrypted before leaving my system. the master password was never transmitted in any form that I could find. No traffic was generated to/from any other port or location.

While it is true that things might have changed since then, the server remains open source and you can confirm that it does not ever touch the master password in any form. More importantly, the system is heavily examined on a continuing basis by security researchers and, while vulnerabilities have been found, reported, and fixed, there has never been any question of the master password leaving the client.

With well over 100 unique, random, long passwords, some only used once or twice a year, I really lack other options than a password vault in a world where accounts might need to be accessed from a desktop, two laptops, and two phones running six OSes (2 VMs and one dual boot).

Comment Re:Encryption is for criminals (Score 1) 198

Encryptions is for criminals. Ordinary people don't need military grade encryption to protect themselves. It's primarily used to hide illicit activities from the police and serves no legitimate purpose.

Like it's no big deal if someone steals your trivially encrypted authentication for your bank account and takes all of your money? But let's go big time like they did in Bangladesh and simply steal directly from the banks.

Even FBI director Comey has stated that encryption is essential. He just believes in magic encryption faeries that will decrypt data that hides terrorists and pedophiles from the good guys. (I.e., Those he defines as good guys.)

Comment Re:So in other words it's used and is useful (Score 1) 248

This is really silly. All a barometer needs is either one or two tiny holes (depending on the design of the sensor). The sensor would need to be sealed to the sensor and water tight, of course, but that is required by any sensor they might use. This story is simply an excuse.

I'll guess two possible reasons for this:
1. Force more use of Apple patented and licensed tech for headphones
2. Allow DRM implementation at the headphone jack to further control what can be played on the iPhone

Comment Re:Softare and wording problem (Score 1) 210

Actually, I think their approach is about right. People tend to follow a reasonably consistent schedule. If you plug your phone in every night and more or less nothing happens until 7:00 next morning, then only change to 80% (which is pretty conservative) or 85% (still avoids the levels that cause most of the damage to the lithium mesh) until about 6:30 and then charge to 100% and does the same based on recorded battery use throughout multiple averaged days, you can have a greater capacity when it is needed, but not have the charge above 90% except for short intervals. This would significantly extend battery life while not significantly reducing the usage time of the phone. Better modeling based on not just daily used, but also looking at day of the week would do even better.

I've been wishing laptops would do this for years. IBM and now Lenovo have been doing a far simpler battery life extension technique for years, but, when I have suggested that it would be good if FreeBSD or Linux do this, I've been unable to get much interest from developers and generally been unable to convince them that this would even be a good thing even when providing pointers to papers on research into l-ion battery behavior showing the significant damage keeping a battery at 100% for long periods does.

I saw a video several years ago that showed a photomicrograph recording showing the physical movement of the lithium grid during charge and discharge at or near "full charge" and how over-charging or even fully charging and holding that charge would slowly break down the grid. I put "full charge" in quotation marks because that number is picked by the manufacturer/designer as a trade-off between capacity and life. Wish I had saved a pointer to this. It was pretty dramatic.

Comment Re:It didn't have an off switch before (Score 1) 369

If my router drops all packets to those IP addresses, it does not matter what is hard-coded or what Widows capabilities are short-cicuited. Almost everyone now has a router and all that I have used allow dropping packets to specified destinations. Cheap ones may not.

The issue of Windows changing this is valid, though. I suspect someone (or several of them) will start serving the list of addresses being used. Someone may well already be doing this.

If you use other Microsoft services, though, those will likely break if you do this.

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