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Comment Re:Rose tinted glasses (Score 1) 460

Seriously this article makes it sound like life just after a devastating conflict is better than economic prosperity because most people are equally poor.

That's pretty fucked up, and I'm calling BS.

From my perspective, the article makes sense. Answer this question. How many different business managers can you manage in a day? Can you comfortably give 1.5 hours to each? So, a boss with 7 direct reporting to him has his day full.

If he is not a shareholder, does he deserve a multimillion dollar salary? Is he so intelligent that he is worth that money?
Why should he make more than 25 times the average middle management salary? Does not that over payment of salary belong to the shareholders? Well, we hear "I appointed xyz as director, and now the directors are all in my league, with above normal compensation". Fxxx the shareholders.

Comment Re:we've been stuck at 4 core for too long (Score 1) 269

Intel has had >4 core CPUs but the affordable stuff for consumers has all been 4 core / 8 thread with the rest of the die given over to GPUs that nobody who needs high performance graphics wants anyway.

I'd be nice to see AMD back in the game to provide some competition for Intel. Lots of workloads can benefit from more cores: compilation, video processing, simulations, many kinds of "embarrassingly parallel" tasks. Anything you might do with xargs -P.

If AMD supplies some competitive pressure to push larger core counts down into the affordable price ranges for average buyers, that'll be a good thing. It's been an artificial restriction anyway. Plus it is good for the health of the market to have competition.

In my dreams I see a dual processor home cpu coming. One processor for disk/network I/O, and the other cpu for video, and calculations (free cell, solitaire, and other games), and of course, the more serious stuff such as browsing the web, facebook, instagram, and Gd nows what else.

I like to twiddle in Linux doing programming in C, so the Ryzen is something I will be acquiring to upgrade from my dual core 2009 system.
   

Comment Re:Too many cores. (Score 1) 73

DIrect comparison (mips * clock frequency) is not a true measure.

There was a posting that doubted AMDs performance against equivalent Intel chips. The author used a frequency * mips rate to indicate throughput.

Here are some explanations about the difference between Ryzen and older CPU chip techolologies.

How to explain the difference? Here is my take. First of all, a 3 ghz frequency means that there are usually 6gig of clock ticks. Some instructions take multiple clock ticks. When cpus are implemented on 14nm cell sizes, there is room within the die for many many more cells. Cells that could be used to do things better.

For example , suppose that a “long integer” multiply/divide requires 20+ clock ticks with one model CPU, and because of design improvements and cell size reductions, the same operation on the Ryzen may only require 16+ clock ticks. That instruction’s execution is improved by 20%.

Consider parallel operations within the cpu chip. To achieve more parallelism, you need to allocate more logic to the multiplier/divider circuitry. And that is probably what has happened. (Smaller micro-circuit sizes allows more logic space available within the CPU die).

You bought a 16core cpu chip. Ask yourself how many internal (additional reserved) cores are present within the chip for the chip to do it’s work? These reserved cores could be working in parallel to implement an instruction, thus completing a complex instruction in fewer clock ticks. (AES encrypt)

Go through all the instructions that can be optimized by smarter circuitry, and you have the explanation why the AMD chips are more performing than ever.

If there are more logic elements, then consider that a “register” shift instruction could be optimized to three or four clock ticks, irrespective of the shift amount. Typically, the shifter hardware moves the bits, according to a specified amount.

I am willing to bet that chip for chip, the AMD has many more transistors and gates for logic to support parallel sub-instruction processing than found in older designs. More parallelism used to support fewer clock-ticks.

Instructions within a CPU are also within a pipeline queue. I do not know the chip internals, but there may be up to 10+ instructions in the input queue that are at various stages of being decoded. The queue is flushed if an interrupt instruction is received.

Taken all together, fewer clock ticks to decode an instruction, perhaps saving some of the queue contents during an interrupt may be the major reason the AMD chips even with slower clock frequencies are faster than older chip designs. Older designs need to boost clock speeds by up to 25% over the AMD chips, to arrive at par.

There was a posting that doubted AMDs performance against equivalent Intel chips.

Here are some additional explanations about the difference. How to explain the difference ?
Here is my take. First of all, a 3 ghz frequency means that there are usually 6gig of clock ticks. Some instructions take multiple clock ticks. When cpus are implemented on 14nm cell sizes, there is room within the die for many many more cells. Cells that could be set aside to do things better.

For example , suppose that a “long integer” multiply/divide requires 20+ clock ticks with one model CPU, and because of design improvements and cell size reductions, the same operation on the Ryzen may only require 16+ clock ticks. That instruction’s execution is improved by 20%.

Consider parallel operations within the cpu chip. To achieve more parallelism, you need to allocate more logic to the multiplier/divider circuitry. And that is probably what has happened. (Smaller micro-circuit sizes allows more logic space available within the CPU die).

You bought a 16core cpu chip. Ask yourself how many internal (additional reserved) cores are present within the chip for the chip to do it’s work? These reserved cores could be working in parallel to implement an instruction, thus completing a complex instruction in fewer clock ticks. (AES encrypt)

Go through all the instructions that can be optimized by smarter circuitry, and you have the explanation why the AMD chips are more performing than ever.

If there are more logic elements then consider that a “register” shift instruction could be optimized to three or four clock ticks, irrespective of the shift amount. Typically, the shifter hardware moves the bits, according to a specified amount.

I am willing to bet that chip for chip, the AMD has many more transistors and gates for logic to support parallel sub-instruction processing than older designs. More parallelism used to support fewer clock-ticks. Those extra cpu bits are not part of the cache.

Instructions within a CPU are also pipelined in a queue. I do not know the AMD chip internals, but there may be up to 10+ instructions in the input queue that are at various stages of being decoded. The queue is flushed if an interrupt instruction is received.

Taken all together, fewer clock ticks to decode an instruction, perhaps saving some of the queue contents during an interrupt, together may be the major reason the AMD chips even with slower clock frequencies are faster than older chip designs. Older designs need to boost clockspeeds by 25% over the AMD chips, to arrive at par.

My 2 cents worth of blah.

Comment Re:Redefining words so we can make a "discovery" (Score 1) 142

A Continent is a landmass, not a slightly shallower section of ocean.

There is no clear, universally agreed definition of what a continent is. Australia was an island not long ago - and Europe is a different continent from Asia, which is absurd, in terms of geography. And there is an argument in favour of calling New Zealand a continent: it is part of a piece of continental crust, which sits on its own, tectonic plate. I would say it is as good a definition as any. Whichever way we look at it, it is hard to argue that there are more than 6 continents, unless we count New Zealand.

Is there some off-shore mineral mining going on?

Comment Re:lack of foresight (Score 1) 187

Heh American

If you travel to another country, you are inferring that they have the right to confiscate and examine the contents of your cellphone. You may not have porne there, but perhaps bank account and credit card info, and some other passwords.

Do unto others as you would want others to do unto you.

Comment Re:Google is planning on ditching the linux kernel (Score 1) 224

When they merge android and chrome os into, fuschia isn't it?

Linux for the desktop is dying. Gnome is click crazy, KDE is menu driven, xfce is menu driven and not too heavy on mouse click demands.
Want Linux to succeed on the desktop, let me use my webcam as a siri or similar application function. I want a truly graphical interface, where by using my finger(s) on the screen, I can drag and drop, open, close an application and do more.

WHEN???

Comment Re:Sooo (Score 1) 79

Are all of the passengers in these self driving cars going to be neat and tidy? Without a semblance of someone being in charge of the car, I think the future od driverless cars might have the unmistakable reek of shit and piss. I don't know is this particular startup is going to be sans a person that sits there and does nothing, but this will be an issue some day. people sans supervision do some odd things.

As the electric cars come to market, each nds car will remove 10 gallons / week of gasoline consumption. That makes you wonder if it is worth building an Oil pipeline through the Decota s

Comment Re:oracle all over again (Score 1) 123

I always preferred Baan. It was good and well performing. You could write your own improvements. Then the heavy marketing by SAP came into play and that made corporate decision takers say, If it's SAP, my job is spared.

At least Baan supported (out of the box) 4 languages (English, French, Spanish and your_own_translated_version)
Now I know Baan became Infor. Its still a tremendous product, even with the change of ownership.

Comment Re:that's it. the end game. (Score 1) 387

The government should impute the wages that a human worker would be paid in 2010 with a Human cost-of-living adjustment based on the Robot's job description, For a given amount of Company revenue by industry.

Then Double the quantity

And compare the Wages the Company is currently paying every month to the Imputed Wages based on the greater of the Total number of robots Jobs, and based on the Company's total revenue and Industry.

Make the companies Pay standard Employee Taxes on the difference between the Imputed Sum and the Actually paid sum, Including what the Social security, Medicare, Income Tax, and Healthcare benefits would be; Require the company actually buy in Health insurance for the robots.

Then make the companies pay an Additional supplement to Income Tax witholding for the robots called the "Automation tax".

Basically, double the income tax rate for automated employees to 60%, after already having doubled the wage, And specify the "Minimum wage" for the lowest jobs for purposes of imputing automated job roles to $20/Hour.

My PACEMAKER IS A ROBOT. What should it or me be taxed?

Comment Re:Our society is fucked (Score 1) 158

No, they want to micromanage people in the name of profit.

Employers aren't using this for anything other than trying to squeeze as much productivity out of people as possible by treating them like robots or animals. This isn't a new trend, as employers have been using monitoring software on computer workstations that determine when people aren't at their desk typing/etc, and keeps track of when they use the bathroom or take a coffee break. It's a terribly short-sighted thing, as people don't function like machines. I'm just glad I work at a job where my output is what's important - that I do the work I'm supposed to, whether I do it quickly or slowly, whether I take breaks or not, and whether I take 30 or 60 minutes for lunch, or whether I waste time posting to Slashdot or not.

Normal bathroom break, a 5 minute chat every hour, a normal 15 minute break twice a day. But a 2 hour lapse while the employee runs errands or is absent after clocking in, is not acceptable.

Comment Re:Uber? (Score 1) 641

She was 3 times over the limit and the fuckwit father is blaming the car? Why is this even on SlashDot

The car is a contributing factor. What is a normal acceleration. Is it 0-60 in 10 seconds? I think that the Tesla was probably a keyless entry, and the father could not stop the driver, no matter what. With slower acceleration, the driver would have more time to react, perhaps braking, before hitting the other vehicle.

Was the Tesla on a one way street, the wrong way? Nothing mentioned in the post.

Comment Re:Which of the 3 do you have an issue with and wh (Score 1) 104

I couldn't find the patent numbers being spoken of here, at least in the first hundred pages of Googles 350+ page brief, and the article itself is pretty useless when it comes to details.

But to answer your question in general, software patents break the entire purpose and intent of the patent system as a whole. That's what makes nearly all of them worthless and impossible.

Patents are intended to describe an implementation of something, previously an implementation of a machine or process.
If one chooses not to design their own machine, they can look for a patent describing a machine that does what they want and license it. At that point you are allowed to build the machine as described in detail in the patent and typically sell it.
That's the entire purpose of licensing a patent in the first place, to save you the time of designing something to perform that function when that work has already been done by someone else.

Software patents however have no such requirement, and thus almost never actually describe any form of working machine or process or anything.

If I want a machine to package my widgets automatically, I could find a patent on a machine to package my particular widget, license it, and use the description of that machine to build a widget packager. If the cost of the patent license is cheaper than doing my own R&D, it's still a win.

But if I want a program to customize my widgets, despite being patents that describe "a process to customize a widget", there is generally no description of any form of software that would do that.
So no matter how much cheaper it would be to license said patent than do my own R&D and programming, actually licensing the patent does not benefit me in any way shape or form since it does not provide any form of software or a design of software that would accomplish that.

Instead the trolls get a patent on the concept and idea of customizing widgets, and then use that to sue me when I do my own R&D and programming work to write a widget customizing program all on my own without their assistance.

That aids no one but the patent trolls, and that aid comes to them for exactly zero effort or work that benefits literally no one.

That is why software patents are wrong and should not exist.

Best to setup a software company in Nigeria, Libia, or anywhere where software patents are illegal. That is what is happening to the American Software Industry. (India, Malaysia and middle east, here we come).

Comment Re:Another breakthrough! News at 11! (Score 1) 218

It seems every 6 months I'm turning on the news to witness another "breakthrough" in energy storage that never seems to make it to the consumer market or anywhere else. Wake me when there's a product I can somehow use in my daily life.

Is the new battery the size of a house, or that of a swimming pool?

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