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Comment Would prefer a seperate app (Score 4, Insightful) 87

Give paint all the crap you want, but for the most basic and quick stuff, it got the job done. I would have preferred them do the notepad/wordpad thing and had the "advanced" version be a separate app. Knowing the them, the bloated version will take forever to load as it pulls in 3d libraries and a horde of other garbage inheritance/dependencies.

Comment Re:These vulnerable IoT devices are here to stay (Score 1) 67

Nice.... So someone with a cell phone sniffs the network, hacks the device, and then uses it to load malware onto the card's photo partition, that then will likely get ran on the next computer the owner plugs the card into.

Not to mention the card itself is a WiFi seeking botnet drone.

I really don't see why they can't get sued for negligence. Car manufactures do, and so does EVERYONE else. Perhaps Dyn should take the largest manufactures of the infected devices to court for just that. Sue for damages due to their negligently unsecured devices.

Comment Re:These vulnerable IoT devices are here to stay (Score 1) 67

You'll never find a perfect solution. But that doesn't mean you don't implement at least the most modest of controls. If the manufacture is held liable for security, then devices won't ship with default passwords and goatse sized vulnerabilities.

After two years of updates, the majority of vulnerabilities that do ship will mostly be identified and patched (or should be at least). After that, a general herd immunity will develop. The devices left insecure after two years will have so much variety between them with different models and versions that it becomes impractical to target them.

IoT devices are less complex then PCs. They serve typically a single purpose with minor user interaction. A secure kernel, running a well written web interface makes for a VERY SMALL attack surface. These devices are only targetable right now because of the blatant disregard for any measurable sign of security.

Comment Re:These vulnerable IoT devices are here to stay (Score 4, Insightful) 67

No we don't. We don't need any reasons for those greedy incompetent asshats to filter our traffic. Instead, manufacturers should be held liable for insecure products, forcing their hand to secure the devices they ship, and to also provide updates. A minimum two year requirement before they can end of life the device, at which point they should have to provide source code for the community to assume updates on or continue to support the device themselves.

The value of the code is then weighed by the cost of continuing support, and they can decide what's the best option for themselves.

Comment US gov.. please help us abuse our customers (Score 2, Insightful) 192

Maybe if Apple didn't sell their cables for such obscene prices, there would be less market demand for Chinese knockoffs. If I can buy 10 cables on eBay at $0.50 each, I don't care if 5 go out in less than a month. Also, I've NEVER seen or heard first hand if one of the knock offs catching fire.

Comment Re:I really don't understand (Score 1) 82

And there is your answer... Because you have the pressure of ebooks to weigh against your manga, Amazon can get away with selling a small capacity system, and make you the fringe user who needs to buy the more expensive models.

In japan, the market force for high capacity storage is large enough that a low capacity model won't do well, and they then have to offer something in between.

Comment Re:Samsung should learn from this experience (Score 1) 158

I wish my battery would last three years. Since I cycle it twice a day, I don't even make it a year. My Nexus 6 is on its second battery, but needs another replacement. Luckily it isn't too bad to pull it apart and replace it. It's not like I need a heat gun or anything. Just a T3 screwdriver for the 22 screws, and a spudger for the back.

Comment Re:What part of this is hard to understand? (Score 1) 182

The problem with permitting this if the tubes are full, is that the ISPs will create a ton a virtual circuits, all running at 80% or whatever the cut-off is, and then implement whatever filtering profits them. So their true capacity may be at 10%, but in technical legalise they comply.

Even if it's as generic as real-time protocols getting priority... how long will it take bittorrent clients to just wrap their packets as RTP traffic so they move faster.

It's really an all or nothing problem, or it will get gamed.

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