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Comment People, Uber is not an employer (Score 1) 258

You can work on your own schedule and for anyone else you want. If that's the convenience you feel entitled to, you're a contractor. You don't get the protection of health benefits or a non-fluctuating wage. If you hate what Uber is doing, you stop doing jobs for them at the rate they'll pay you. It's that simple. You don't get the benefits of working like a contractor, with the expectations of being an employee. ... for driving. Jesus. When people begin to demand higher pay and more benefits for low skilled jobs, they get replaced with robots. It's happened in manufacturing, fast food, banking, etc. It'll happen to drivers too. Very very soon. And good riddance. You have to work 70hrs sitting on your ass driving, yet can pay all of your bills, and still complain about unfair your life is? Fuck you. I can't wait to tell my future robot driver how ungrateful you were. You don't like the pay, get a real fucking job. I'd rather be driven by restless retirees anyway. They're far more interesting and are thrilled at the idea that they can make extra income by driving. No self entitlement.

Comment Can confirm (Score 1) 153

I spent months trying to give them millions in license fees. Our millions weren't enough to deal with corporate, so we were directed to third parties. After months of being shit on, we transitioned our entire backend architecture. They could have had their name on some major big-ass product launch, but no. We weren't giving them at least $250m per year. Dealing with Oracle is a bullshit experience. If any Oracle customer could move onto Excel or even text files, they would in an instant. The levels of shit one can endure have no limit when it comes to them. The company is shit. Their customer service is shit, unless you have enough money. It's sad, actually. Oracle, the database, is pretty f'ing awesome. The company... worse than a pyramid scheme run by Hitler.

Comment Re:Eating sounds (Score 1) 290

Yes. To expand upon this phenomenon (drinking): There was this brilliant engineer that I'll just call S. S was amazing. He built mind astonishing things in hours that would take a mere mortal days... and he loved coffee. Every 10-15 seconds, he'd pick up his cup, slurp like loudness was an award, then smash it down. All day long he did this. 3-4 times per minute! How could I complain? This guy could synthesize in hardware at the same speed I could write in software. Brilliant, but very distracting. This was before Soundcloud, Pandora, and Spotify. If it weren't for my iPod, I would have become enraged.

Comment Eating sounds (Score 4, Insightful) 290

These are by far my worst favorite. I keep hearing the voice of my mother yelling "chew with your mouth closed!" It's never a problem at lunch or wherever expected. At my desk? Why do I need to HEAR people eat? I've had several colleagues over the years carbureting their food with open mouths, with chunks falling out onto the floor. I recently had to sit next to one guy that would make sucking sounds as he'd suck his fingers clean several times during his snacks, which were constant. Vegetarians & vegans need to eat quite regularly. The clanking of spoons on porcelain bowls. The resonance of hollow skulls munching on granola. The mushy sounds. My tolerance is about five minutes. Annoyance sets in at ten. Aggravation at fifteen. Psychosis at thirty. The last job... I took a lot of walks. This one guy would load up a bowl of snacks and proceed to noisily eat them for two hours slowly, savoring every bite and letting us all know. Without headphones, I would be in jail from my murderous rampage. I'm trying to grasp fifteen concepts in a head that can, at best, hold seven at once. The repetitious unnecessary noise of gluttony is a distraction.

Comment Re:Rewrites are easier than the first strike (Score 2) 341

I do agree that a language-to-language rewrite would yield impressive gains... but that's not the whole of it. Cassandra is an edge case ... and yes, the Lucene code could use some love (contribute some patches??)

C++ isn't necessarily the best choice for everything, just like a Mclaren F1 isn't the optimum choice to pick up groceries. But if your requirements dictate that performance is a chief priority, it most certainly is.

I've written many Java and C++ systems at scale. Java simply does not excel at maximizing the use of system resources, predictable real-time performance nor high uptime. Stomp your feet all you want and pretend it's not true if you like. Java trades off performance to provide features to developers that they cannot override. Fact.

Java is fine for 99% of most everything ever written. Honest. Cookbook blog: great! That 1% though where every bit matters, that's when you take off the training wheels and code as low as you can tolerate or afford.

What Java zealots in the Cassandra and Hadoop communities kept boasting was the idea that vertical performance doesn't matter anymore. Solve all of the problems with JVM unreliability and poor performance under the umbrella of big data and more hardware. This makes sense at a few dozen servers. It's insane when you start considering scale at 100s or 1000s.

I hope DataStax considers making Cassandra more cost effective. The simplest way is to get rid of the JVM and give me a machine code binary. I'd really like to throw 128GB of RAM to my nodes, but Java won't let me.

Submission + - Haiku OS Will Get New Service Manager (haiku-os.org)

jones_supa writes: Axel Dörfler writes in his blog that he is working on a replacement for Haiku OS's current shell script based boot process. It would be replaced with something more flexible, a solution similar to OS X's launchd and Linux's systemd. While there is still a lot to do, the new project called launch_daemon is now feature complete in terms of being able to completely reproduce the current boot process. Since the switch to their package manager, there was no longer a way to influence the boot process at all. The only file you could change was the UserBootscript which is started only after Tracker and Deskbar — the whole system is already up at this point. The new service manager gives the power back to you, and also allows arbitrary software to be launched on startup. Alternatively, you can prevent system components from being started at all if you so wish. Furthermore, it allows for event based application start, start on demand, a multi-threaded boot process, and even enables you to talk to servers before they actually started.

Comment Re: It's true! (Score -1, Flamebait) 282

I think it's awfully pretentious that some "developers" feel ENTITLED to the time of open source volunteers, when they don't make every effort possible to answer their own question. This is time people spend away from family. I think what you're seeing is the eventual result of being bombarded by people that refuse to search Google first. People that won't crack a book that think all information should be spoon fed by anyone by request. I myself have stopped releasing any more projects due to the arrogant and unappreciative behavior of my users. I don't need to spend the last hour of my day holding a lazy developer's hand.

Comment Re: Hard to believe (Score 2) 804

It's like comparing Kraft Mac & Chesse to your own homemade. Sure, making your own is less expensive and has more options for upgrades (bacon)... but Kraft is much more convenient if you don't want to sweat the details, has a nice box & packaged look, and a taste you cannot fully replicate on your own.

Comment Re:what keeps us from switching ? (Score 1) 372

The lack of cross-document ACID in MongoDB is both overblown and overlooked. Mongo will work in specific domains, as long as you put a lot of forethought into your schema. For a lot of cases, however, you just can't get around multi-stage commits, background batch processing, etc. ... essentially, hacking minimal "transaction" support offered by an RDBMS.

Comment In my experience, it's ease of use (Score 1) 372

I've used just about every major RDBMS in production. Oracle, in my experience, is the most forgiving and has a query optimizer that nearly eliminates the need to think. PostgreSQL works wonderfully in the hands of a competent engineer. Oracle works well for people that barely know SQL. Much of Oracle's complexity comes with the training wheels it provides... at the expense of cost, configuration, tuning, administration, customer service, etc.

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