Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - What is employers obsession with programming languages? 1

An anonymous reader writes: Just got off the phone with a recruiter for a company and the lady asked if I had 3-4 years C++ and 3-4 years Java experience. Okay, so first off, C++ and Java are two different programming languages used for two completely different purposes.

C++ being used mainly for low-level platform specific programming and Java being platform independent. My response was I programmed in C++ throughout college, but haven't worked any jobs specifically writing C++ and I've had Java experience in past jobs, but mostly used C# which was similar.

She said, "Oh well we are only looking for those two languages so thanks anyways". Is it just me or is this absolutely insane? It's like wanting to hire a mechanic who has 3-4 years experience working with just 1978 ford trucks. I mean really? How did we get to this point as engineers?

As any developer worth their weight in salt can attest, the languages are so similar it's kind of difficult to distinguish between them looking at syntax alone and if you've got a computer science background or equiv what's it really matter if the underlying OOP concepts are the same.

Is this just a result of incompetent managers and ignorant recruiters or as engineers have we set ourselves up by succumbing to a label such as Java Engineer or C# Programmer.

Should I just say yes, and move forward with the interview? I mean, I could probably answer most C++/Java programming questions unless they are truly looking for people who spend all their time memorizing specific libraries or API's which in my opinion is insane. I equate that to trying to memorize a phone book. You can but why would you want to?

Not only is it frustrating as a job candidate, but it seems to really be limiting your hiring pool to a small few who by chance happen to work in a couple different programming languages over the course of their career. How do most of you handle this sort of thing?

Submission + - Globalization Considered Harmful

theodp writes: In the wake of Brexit, the NY Times reported earlier this month that President Obama will need his oratory powers to sell globalization. Asked to explain his strategy to reverse growing sentiment over globalization, President Obama responded, "The question is not whether or not there's going to be an international global economy. There is one." Still, the President acknowledged, "Ordinary people who have concerns about trade have a legitimate gripe about globalization, because the fact is that as the global economy is integrated, what we've seen are trend lines across the advanced economies of growing inequality and stagnant wages, and a smaller and smaller share of overall productivity and growth going to workers, and a larger portion going to the top 1 percent. And that's a real problem. Because if that continues, the social cohesion and political consensus needed for liberal market economies starts breaking down." The disconnect between theory and reality is at the heart of Ross Hartshorn's Globalization Considered Harmful. "There is a word for people who are opposed to the globalized economy, and it isn't 'xenophobe' or 'racist'," he writes. "It's 'protectionist'. For some time now, it's been thrown around as an insult, as if there were something wrong with protecting people. There was a similar trick played in the U.S. with the word 'liberal', where conservatives used it as an insult long enough that candidates on the left started to avoid describing themselves as liberal. But there is nothing wrong with protecting people, and there is everything wrong with globalization. Globalization isn't about respecting other people's culture, or treating everyone fairly regardless of their race. Globalization is about each country specializing in just one part of a normal, healthy, diverse economy, and then treating anyone whose talents aren't suited to that part of the economy, as if they were defective and in need a handout rather than a job. I think it is time for people who don't like what globalization has done, to start using the word 'protectionist' to describe themselves. I am a protectionist; I think there is nothing wrong with protecting people. The backlash against globalization isn't the problem. Globalization is the problem."

Submission + - SpaceX's Elon Musk says he will launch the first human to Mars in 2024 (blastingnews.com)

MarkWhittington writes: Elon Musk, the CEO of SpaceX and Tesla, attended the Recode Conference where he opened his mind about his vision for Mars exploration. He had previously announced his intention to send a robotic probe to the Martian surface called Red Dragon in 2018. But that mission is just the start of an ambitious program that will see the first human being launched to the Red Planet in 2024 “if all goes well.” If the announcement becomes reality, Musk will see the first astronaut landing on Mars by 2025, about ten years before NASA plans for boots on the Martian ground.

Submission + - Burning all fossil fuels would scorch Earth (phys.org)

mspohr writes: A new study published in the Journal Nature Climate Change (Nature Climate Change, Nature Climate Change, DOI: 10.1038/nclimate3036) (and reported in phys.org) shows our precarious climate condition:
"Using up all known fossil fuel reserves would render Earth even more unliveable than scientists had previously projected, researchers said on Monday.
Average temperatures would climb by up to 9.5 degrees Celsius (17 degrees Fahrenheit)—five times the cap on global warming set at climate talks in Paris in December, they reported.
In the Arctic region—already heating at more than double the global average—the thermometer would rise an unimaginable 15 C to 20 C."

This would make most of Earth uninhabitable to humans (although the dinosaurs seemed to do fine with it 65 million years ago).

Comment Re: Good news (Score 4, Insightful) 155

> thousands of times more than the negligible amount mankind has ever produced
nice try.
the yearly production of CO2 by humans is MUCH higher than the yearly CO2 production by volcanoes.
from first link I found :
-->volcanoes release a total of about 200M ton of CO2 annually.
-->global fossil fuel CO2 emissions (2003) = 26B ton CO2

Submission + - Stanford researchers show fracking's impact to drinking water sources (stanford.edu)

chasm22 writes: "This is a wake-up call," said lead author Dominic DiGiulio, a visiting scholar at Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. "It's perfectly legal to inject stimulation fluids into underground drinking water resources. This may be causing widespread impacts on drinking water resources."

Perhaps we should change that to "It's perfectly legal and, for the most part, hugely profitable, to inject...".

Slashdot Top Deals

Algol-60 surely must be regarded as the most important programming language yet developed. -- T. Cheatham