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Comment Why do people care so much? (Score 1) 89

Why do people care so much about the lack of women in tech but don't seem to care at all about the lack of women or men in other fields? And even when they do pretend to care in other fields there is only a push to hire more women in general in various roles but never an explicit push to put them in exactly the same dangerous jobs that are still filled by 99% males.

Comment Re:Great use of Mozilla resources (Score 1) 84

> ripping out cool Firefox features like full themes support and tab groups the free up development and test time for these boondoggles. People have nagged them for years for multi-process / process-per-tab and the changes needed to make that happen will break many things. So either break things and deliver the speed/stability features people have been begging for or don't break anything and never satisfy those very vocal users.

Comment Re:The list of prefixed properties (Score 1) 132

possible reasons: The developer is dead. The business owner is dead but paid for 6 years of hosting up front. The business has no budget for any changes. The business has no idea something is broken. There is no business, some one just put up a page full of dbz gifs on a free hosting account and it got popular. That person has moved on to more interesting things and has no idea some visitors see a problem. They just keep it up because the ads on the site generate about $50 per year.

Comment anyone (Score 1) 287

any Amazon member with a registered selling account can create authentic looking pages and list items 'for sale' online.
Consumers need only take a screen capture of the page and show it to a cashier at checkout in order to request the price match."

If a print out is all that's needed then anyone with knowledge of ctrl + shift + i or photoshop or paint or using a photo copier can do this easily.

Comment Re:foundation (Score 1) 246

And don't teach any typical "web design" GUI applications. Knowing how to really understand text and how to manipulate it, mass find and replace, regular expressions, utf-8 vs ISO Latin 1, line endings, tabs, spaces, byte order marks, etc. These are very useful things to know. On many projects over the years I've had to convert ancient custom storage formats (that luckily all turned out to be plain text files) into mysql data and knowing these things about text itself were essential.

Comment Re:I'm confused (Score 1) 246

I'd like to suggest:

Intro to HTML itself could be condensed to 1 or 2 days.

A lot of time should be spent on HTML + CSS
and then HTML + DOM + basic JS transitioning to HTML + re-usable JS transitioning to HTML + jQuery
and then the Javascript language itself
and then the best ways to organize your app/site's JS code
and then a server side language
and then HTML FORMS + server side code
Might also be useful to introduce the idea of using DOM outside of browser JS, like with PHP on the server or Node

Comment foundation (Score 1) 246

Full time web developer for 12 years, no vacations, no co-workers, no college, no experience with "real/serious" languages, no math skills, no appreciation for CLI. I suggest some modern quick and easy stuff like frameworks and jquery initially to allow them to have the feeling of actually making something. But after that all the focus should be on foundation skills that would also be useful beyond just websites/webapps. Having those skills will make it possible to quickly pick up whatever else they encounter in the future. But make sure everyone takes a math test before starting the class. I go years at a time without having to use ANY math at all and then when I do need to I take 10x longer than any normal person to build the simplest things.

Comment let me get hooked (Score 1) 687

I have no advice for the game industry. But for a utility for graphic designers my suggestion would be to let me demo the software. Not for a limited amount of times but for a limited number of uses. I recently got a demo for a drawing application. It's limited to 30 days. I only sometimes need to draw anything. So in the next 30 days I'll maybe only have 4 real reasons to open it and will make time to play around with it in my spare time maybe 3 times max. But if I were given a limit of say 100 chances to run the program within a time limit of 9 months, that would definitely give me enough time to really evaluate, utilize, and possibly become dependant upon the software.

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