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Submission + - Razer Buys THX: What This Could Mean for Your Future Man Cave (audioholics.com)

Audiofan writes: On Monday THX announced that it was purchased by Razer, a computer gaming hardware company. Razer CEO Min-Liang Tan promises to let THX run independently. Tan added that there will be collaborations bringing together THX audio experience and Razer computer technology. But many see the deal as yet another low point for the once proud THX logo. Will this shape the future of home entertainment and leap forward Virtual Reality technologies or is it just further liquidation of a once sought after brand?

Submission + - Target Passes Walmart As Top US Corporate Installer of Solar Power (electrek.co)

An anonymous reader writes: Target is the top corporate installer of solar power in the USA with 147MW installed on 300 stores. Walmart is close behind with 140MW, while Ikea has installed solar on 90% of its retail locations. The Solar Energy Institute of America (SEIA) report shows over 1,000MW of solar installed in almost 2,000 unique installations by the largest corporate entities in the country. Additionally these groups have more than doubled their installation volume year on year, with 2015 seeing a total of 130MW, while 2016 is projected to be closer to 280MW. Big box retail locations offer some of the best potential spaces for solar power to be installed – on top of square, flat structures and in previously built parking lots. The average size of an installation by a company in this group is about 500kW – 75X the size of an average residential solar installation. The RE100 organization has signed up 81 global corporations (many on the SEIA list) who have pledged 100% renewable energy. “We’re incredibly proud of the progress we’ve made in improving building efficiencies and reducing environmental impact. Our commitment to installing solar panels on 500 stores and distribution centers by 2020 is evidence of that progress” – said John Leisen, vice president of property management at Target. The geographic breakdown of solar installations is based upon three main drivers – good sunlight, expensive electricity and state level renewable mandates, with Southern California having all three. The northeast USA, with its ">expensive electricity and aggressive clean energy push, has been on par with California (50% of total solar) for commercial installations. A report put together by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the World Resources Institute (WRI) breaks down the various state level laws that support corporations going green – and, without surprise, it becomes clear that the legal support of renewable energy is a definite driver.

Submission + - SPAM: How to Protect Your Google Gmail from Russia's Putin and WikiLeaks

Lauren Weinstein writes: Word is out from multiple intelligence sources and security researchers that Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta’s Gmail account was hacked by (you guessed it!) Russian hackers under the direction of the Russian government (aka Vladimir Putin), for public distribution of Podesta’s email messages via Putin’s propaganda publishing arm: Julian Assange’s WikiLeaks. All of this in furtherance of Putin’s “Get Ignorant Puppet Trump Elected U.S. President!” project.

Apparently Podesta fell victim to a typical “spear phishing” attack, typing his Google Gmail credentials into a convincing (but fake) Google login page.

People fall for this kind of thing every day.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Secure methods for baby monitoring

Szeraax writes: Big time nerd, first time father (well, first and second since I just had twins!). Ideally, I can track temperature and heart rate of my new family members without causing a security nightmare on my home network. I see lots of arm bands from China that claim security, but even their documentation pictures are pure chinese screen shots. That makes me immediately leary of the device. I can use a private WLAN on my router for the devices if needed. I can connect via bluetooth on phone or computer. Is my best bet to check vitals manually and plot results in LibreOffice calc? Are there monitoring devices that totally avoid the cloud rush of today? Should I just not even waste my time with the data?

Slashdot, what advice do you have for me?

Submission + - Cryptographic proof Wikileak podesta emails have been modified? (pastebin.pl)

An anonymous reader writes: Downloading the raw email from wikileaks directly and running it through opendkim-msgtest will on a suprising number of "raw" emails from wikileaks indicate that the DKIM signature is incorrect. eg.

curl https://wikileaks.org/podesta-... | opendkim-testmsg


curl https://wikileaks.org/podesta-... | opendkim-testmsg

There is a list of modified emails posted on a pastebin right now http://pastebin.pl/view/351dca...

Because the DKIM header contains the checksum of the message body and is signed with the servers public key it would seem to be irrefutable proof of email tampering before the emails were given to wikileaks.

Submission + - First New US Nuclear Reactor In 20 Years Goes Live (cnn.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Tennessee Valley Authority is celebrating an event 43 years in the making: the completion of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant. In 1973, the TVA, one of the nation's largest public power providers, began building two reactors that combined promised to generate enough power to light up 1.3 million homes. The first reactor, delayed by design flaws, eventually went live in 1996. Now, after billions of dollars in budget overruns, the second reactor has finally started sending power to homes and businesses. Standing in front of both reactors Wednesday, TVA President Bill Johnson said Watts Bar 2, the first US reactor to enter commercial operation in 20 years, would offer clean, cheap and reliable energy to residents of several southern states for at least another generation. Before Watts Bar 2, the last time an American reactor had fired up was in 1996. It was Watts Bar 1--and according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, it cost $6.8 billion, far greater than the original price tag at $370 million. In the 2000s, some American power companies, faced with growing environmental regulations, eyed nuclear power again as a top alternative to fossil fuels such as coal and oil. A handful of companies, taking advantage of federal loan guarantees from the Bush administration, revived nuclear reactor proposals in a period now known as the so-called "nuclear renaissance." Eventually, nuclear regulators started to green light new reactors, including ones in Georgia and South Carolina. In 2007, the TVA resumed construction on Watts Bar 2, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency. The TVA originally said it would take five years to complete. The TVA, which today serves seven different southern states, relies on nuclear power to light up approximately 4.5 million homes. Watts Bar 2, the company's seventh operating reactor, reaffirms its commitment to nukes for at least four more decades, Johnson said Wednesday. In the end, TVA required more than five years to build the project. The final cost, far exceeding its initial budget, stood at $4.7 billion.

Submission + - Wired says Google's Pixel is the best phone on the market

swillden writes: The reviews on Google's Pixel phones are coming in, and they're overwhelmingly positive. Most call them the best Android phones available, and at least one says they're the best phones available, period.

Wired's reviewer says he used to recommend the iPhone to people, but now he says "You should get a Pixel." The Verge, says "these are easily the best Android phones you can buy." The Wall Street Journal calls the Pixel "the Android iPhone you've been waiting for." ComputerWorld says "It's Android at its best."

AndroidPolice is more restrained, calling it "A very good phone by Google." The NY Times broke from the rest, saying "the Pixel is, relatively speaking, mediocre", but I'm a little skeptical of a reviewer who can't figure out how to use a rear-mounted fingerprint scanner without using both hands. It makes me wonder if he's actually held one.

Submission + - New browser fingerprinting site launched

AnonymousCube writes: The University of Adelaide and ACEMS has launched a new browser fingerprinting test suite.
On the site you can see what data can be used to track you and how unique your fingerprint is.
The site includes new tests such as detecting software such as Privacy Badger via how social media buttons are disabled and CSS only (no JavaScript or flash) tests to get screen size and installed fonts.

Submission + - SPAM: Your Employees Are Using Social Media at Work; Deal Wi

EclipseMicroMarkets writes:

A recent survey conducted by the Pew Research Center confirmed what I have long thought. Your employees are using social media at work- 77 percent of them. And I believe even that number is low.

Meanwhile, another recent survey, this one by CareerBuilder (h/t Ragan.com) attributes smartphones to the fact that 20 percent of full-time workers say they work less than five hours per day.

It's not all bad news for employers. The same study found that evidence that workplace social media policies concerning impact on-the-job use. Workers whose companies have policies regulating social media use at work are less likely to use social media in certain ways:
  • 30 percent of workers whose companies have an at-work social media policy say they use social media while on the job to take a break from work, compared with 40 percent of workers whose employers do not have such policies.
  • 20 percent of workers whose employers have at-work social media policies say they use social media to stay connected to family and friends while on the job, compared with 35percentof workerswhose social media use is not regulated at work.
  • Only 16percentof workers whose companies regulate social media at work say they use social mediawhile working to get information that's helpful to their job, compared with 25percentof thosewhose workplaces have no such regulations.

What does all this mean? Despite the help that social media policies provide, employers that try regulate personal social media use out of the workplace are fighting a losing battle. I call it the iPhone-ification of the American workforce. No matter your policy, if your employees can take their smartphones out of their pockets to circumvent the policy, how can you possibly police workplace social media access? Why have a policy you cannot police and enforce? And, don't forget, the NLRB is watching, too.

Instead of regulating an issue you cannot hope to control, treat employees' use of social media for what it is — a performance issue. If an employee is not performing up to standards because he or she is spending too much time on the internet, then address the performance problem. A slacking employee will not become a star performer just because you limit his or her social media access; he or she will just find another way to slack off.

Jon Hymanis a partner at Meyers, Roman, Friedberg & Lewis in Cleveland. Comment below or email editors@workforce.com.

Tags: Practical Employer, social media

The post Your Employees Are Using Social Media at Work; Deal With It appeared first on Workforce Magazine.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Grover lets you rent electronics on the cheap (techcrunch.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Shopping online for electronics can be overwhelming. First you have the tech blog reviews, and then the forums, and then the product page itself. Finding the right product, at the right price, can be difficult. That's where Grover (formerly ByeBuy) comes in. For roughly 5 percent of the retail price, users can rent electronics for a month and try before they buy. Plus, users can extend Read More

Submission + - Spotify Is Now Selling Your Information To Advertisers (engadget.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Spotify is now opening its data to targeted advertising. "Everything from your age and gender, to the music genres you like to listen to will be available to various third-party companies," reports Engadget. "Spotify is calling it programmatic ad buying and has already enabled it." The nearly 70 million people that currently use Spotify's free, ad-supported streaming service across 59 countries will be affected. The ads will audio-based and stretch between 15-30 seconds in length. The advertisers who buy ad spots will be able to look for specific users by viewing their song picks to find the best matches for the products they're selling.

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