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Submission + - Universe NOT expanding at accelerating rate? (sciencedaily.com)

uvajed_ekil writes: From ScienceDaily.com:

Five years ago, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to three astronomers for their discovery that the universe is expanding at an accelerating pace. This led to the widespread acceptance of the idea that the universe is dominated by a mysterious substance named 'dark energy' that drives this accelerating expansion. Now, a team of scientists has cast doubt on this standard cosmological concept. The evidence for acceleration may be flimsier than previously thought, they say, with the data being consistent with a constant rate of expansion.

If correct, this may turn cosmology on its ear yet again. Perhaps we don't need anything as exotic as dark energy to explain the universe's expansion, after all.

Comment Yawn (Score 1) 81

This is great. I can't wait til the obligatory settlement is approved and we get coupons or slightly reduced rates on additional services. They will settle, and whatever they pay out will not amount to much for the average consumer. Just like with Ticketmaster, where they got off with only having to give out some tickets to events of their choosing, many of which would have gone unsold anyway, and many consumers who were wronged got absolutely nothing. Unfortunately the only way to truly make things right and punish shitty companies is to file your own suit, spend a ton of money on it, and take them to trial.

Comment Re:So how does this affect the Drake Equation? (Score 1) 258

Yes, yes, yes. We are learning more and more all the time, so it is reasonable to surmise there is much that we still don't know, and potential technologies that would appear to be ludicrous today. We can't make FTL travel work today, even in the most basic theoretical sense, but I can't get on board with the idea that it can't possibly ever happen.

And don't get me started on the Drake equation, which is utterly unprovable and reliant on blind assumptions. I hate how some people treat it as gospel while it is more like junk math than science. Interesting, yes, but ultimately just a thought experiment that should neither dissuade us from dreaming nor blind us from what we can observe. Any current estimates resulting from use of the Drake equation should be taken with a grain of salt, as they are complete bullshit.

Comment Re:So how does this affect the Drake Equation? (Score 3, Interesting) 258

It's very probable. But since we also know that the Periodic Table of Elements is universal, as well as the fundamental forces, we also know things like warp drive are just not feasible...

So they are over there, and we are here. End of story.

Not end of story. In fact, we have no idea how the story ends, or even how long it is. The human notion of accepted physics has been constantly evolving and is still changing every year. For example, two hundred years ago we had virtually no understanding of electromagnetism, or that our theories of electricity and magnetism would be unified. I find it incredibly arrogant and shortsighted to believe that FTL travel via warp drive must be impossible simply because our current understanding of the universe (which we know to be incomplete) can't make it work.

We believe antimatter exists yet we are terrible at working with it. Hell, we still don't know anything about dark energy or dark matter, though we think they probably exist. We spend billions of dollars searching for predicted subatomic particles and find things we hadn't even imagined, and we are just beginning to get into quantum spookiness. It was not so many generations ago that terrestrial human flight sounded preposterous, so I'm a long way from accepting the conjecture that warp drive is not possible. It could be that we are multiple currently-unimaginable breakthroughs away from starting to understand how.

Comment Re:nice work if ya can get it (Score 1) 103

I wouldn't mind being a failure for a $219 million dollar retirement.

This is a ringing success, by Trump's definition. She made out so she was highly successful at the job, her company be damned. Of course they were already screwed and she did nothing to reverse the screwing, so who cares about the employees, shareholders, customers, etc. Them losing money means it was dumb on their part, following Trump logic, I'll tell ya, believe me!

My cover letter when I apply to be Yahoo's CEO will be simply this (and no stealing!):
I will MAKE YAHOO! GREAT AGAIN, believe me. She screwed up some things, she screwed up with the email server, screwed up really huge, and if you ask me, I won't say say she's working for someone else, but maybe she is, she could be, who knows, and now I'm the outsider you want because I have limited experience with these things, and have never been a CEO or an IT insider, I'm an outsider, and my plan is to make Yahoo! profitable again and end the bad times, by you know, bringing us back to the good, with more profit, not losses, losses are bad, and we don't want those, trust me!

Comment Re:Self Driving and BMW drivers (Score 1) 254

What's a "Lexus" ? Around here we call them "Tesla Tollways"

An overpriced but equally boring Toyota. If you buy an ES instead of a loaded Camry or Avalon, you are just getting gouged. And I see more giant SUVs and various German cars abusing restricted lanes more than anything else.

Comment Re:In all fairness (Score 1) 254

It's okay, it was just trying to get the passenger to Primanti Bros. as quickly as possible. And I can attest to the fact that Pittsburgh, especially Oakland, has a few confusing streets that can fool those of us who are not familiar with the area. I'll forgive Uber for this one (but not for cheating drivers and being so anti-tip).

Comment Let me guess... (Score 1) 197

Since this is Google we're talking about, can we assume there is no microSD? Overpriced internal storage and small capacities on the cheapest models, with no external storage, was the biggest failure of the Nexus line, and the main thing that turned me off. Google continued to push slow, cumbersome cloud storage while people bought scads of Samsung and other phones with expandable storage. Is this Google as usual, or have they seen the light? These new phones sound amazing, but I can't get by with 32GB and I bet the premium for the 128GB models will be high. And are these expected to be SIM-unlocked and have unlocked boot loaders, or is that changing as they kill the Nexus name?

Comment Re: Who wants one? (Score 1) 186

Well done, old_kennyp. Your attention to the multi-ton vehicle you operate means that of the eight times that people hit my cars in the past twenty years, it was you precisely zero times! On the other hand, one accident was caused by a young lady on a cell phone (who hit me head on - after I stopped at a stop sign!), one was an old lady fussing with her purse, one was a young man distracted by a passenger's cell phone, and one was a young lady who was eating and dropped something on her pants. I know from experience how serious even slight distractions can be while driving.

Comment Re: Who wants one? (Score 1) 186

Do you drive? Because I do, and it's handy as hell. Read/write messages without removing your hands from the steering wheel, or make calls or prettt much anything you want.

there are many situations in which is very handy to use a phone/computer with your voice, and some have saved lives.

I drive, a lot. And I think I'm pretty decent at it. Part of my success as a driver has been recognizing how much distractions can negatively impact my driving, and by distractions I mean even just conversing with passengers or especially talking on the phone hands-free. I honestly don't want more excuses to use technology on the road, whether hands-free or voice-activated. Surely using Siri is safer than texting, but I feel that technology that requires less attention can lull people into a false sense of security, resulting in them fiddling with BT phones, changing music, using Siri, etc. way more than they should.

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