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First build of Windows 9 shows start menu return but with Modern tiles

Billly Gates (198444) writes | 4 minutes ago

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Billly Gates (198444) writes "A leaked alpha of Windows 9 has been brewing on the internet. Today a screenshot shows what MS showed us at BUILD which includes a start menu with additional tiny tiles for things like people, calendar, pc settings, and news etc. What the screenshot does show is it is much bigger than Windows7 taking 1/3 of the screen similar to the Start Screen which will show more apps (frequently used desktop apps) in addition to other features. Is this a shift for MS to fix Windows 8? Or do some of us who are really still used to XP and Windows 7 won't allow anything modern in it? Also what is unknown is the return of AERO, and how will Cortana fit voice control fit in?"
Link to Original Source

UK Government: Scotland Could Be Base For Spaceport

Anonymous Coward writes | 1 hour ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Scotland could take a giant leap for mankind by becoming the home of Britain’s first spaceport. UK Government ministers will announce on Tuesday eight potential sites for a base for sending rockets and tourists into orbit. RAF bases at Kinloss and Leuchars are believed to be among contenders for the spaceport, which would open in 2018 and be Britain’s answer to Cape Canaveral. Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander said: "I am delighted that the government is pushing forward with its ambitious plans to open a spaceport in the UK by 2018. Spaceports will be key to us opening up the final frontier of commercial space travel. Scotland has a proud association with space exploration. We celebrated Neil Armstrong's Scottish ancestry when he became the first man on the Moon and only last week an amazing Scottish company was responsible for building the UK Space Agency's first satellite. The UK space industry is one of our great success stories and I am sure there will be a role for Scotland to play in the future.""

White House still insists Obama admin 'Most Transparent' in History

schwit1 (797399) writes | 2 hours ago

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schwit1 (797399) writes "The White House on Sunday stood by President Obama's position that he continues to be the most transparent president in U.S. history, despite widespread complaints from journalists and other Americans about a lack of information or apparent misinformation.

“I have a responsibility in this job to try to help the president live up to his commitment to be the most transparent president in history,” new White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said on CNN’s “Reliable Sources.”

Earnest said he “absolutely, absolutely” sticks by Obama’s line about having the most transparent administration, after continued criticism about apparent attempts to not make full disclosures.

Among the criticisms are that the president and his administration misled Americans by telling them they could keep their existing health insurance plans under ObamaCare, intentionally tried to conceal what sparked the 2012 terror attacks in Benghazi, Libya in which four Americans were killed and prosecuted federal employees who should have been protected under the whistleblower protection act."

Link to Original Source

Walter Munk's Astonishing Wave-Tracking Experiment

Anonymous Coward writes | 4 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "His name is Walter Munk, now in his 90s and a professor emeritus at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California. About 60 years ago, he was anchored off Guadalupe Island, on Mexico's west coast, watching swells come in, and using an equation that he and others had devised to plot a wave's trajectory backward in time, he plotted the probable origins of those swells. But the answer he got was so startling, so over-the-top improbable, that he thought, 'No, there must be something wrong.' His equations said that the swells hitting beaches In Mexico began some 9,000 miles away — somewhere in the southern reaches of the Indian Ocean, near Antarctica. 'Could it be?' he wrote in an autobiographical sketch. Could a storm half way across the world produce a patch of moving water that traveled from near the South Pole, up past Australia, then past New Zealand, then across the vast expanse of the Pacific, arriving still intact – at a beach off Mexico? He decided to find out for himself. That is why, in 1957, Walter Munk designed a global, real life, wave-watching experiment."

New Raspberry Pi Model B+ Leaked by Mistake

speps (1108625) writes | 6 hours ago

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speps (1108625) writes "Hack A Day got news of Element14 of a new model of Raspberry Pi named "B+". This new model is rumored to have 2 additional USB ports, MicroSD, A/V combined into jack port and maybe a new chipset (mentioned in the comments and we can see a Samsung chip in the pictures).

Comments on the official forums seem to have been removed without any explanation. Also the specsheet has leaked from some manufacturers but it might not reflect the exact specs."

Link to Original Source

Public To Vote On Names For Exoplanets

Anonymous Coward writes | 8 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "In response to the increased interest by the public in astronomy, the International Astronomical Union (IAU), the world authority that names objects in space, is giving the public a chance to name up to 30 planets from a pre-selected group of 305 exoplanets. "Before you get excited about naming HAT-P-7b after your first pet goldfish, it's worth taking a look at the restrictions the IAU places on its minor planet names. The 16 characters or less must be 'pronounceable (in as many languages as possible)' and non-offensive in any language or culture. The names of living persons are verboten, pet names are 'discouraged,' and you can't use a name that is commercial or has political, military, or religious connotations." The proposed names can be submitted by astronomy clubs and non-profit organisations interested in astronomy and votes will be cast by the public from across the world."

Solving the K-5 Scholastic Chess Facilitation Puzzle

theodp (442580) writes | 9 hours ago

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theodp (442580) writes "The good news, writes Michael Thomas, is that wired kids are learning chess at an unprecedented rate. Young children learning chess from tablets can quickly become more knowledgeable than their parents. But the bad news, laments Thomas, is there is so much demand for scholastic chess that there are not enough experienced chess facilitators to go around. Could technology like RFID-tagged chess pieces or services like ChessStream.com be employed to referee second-grader chess matches, Thomas wonders, or are more well-meaning-but-not-necessarily-expert human facilitators — a la T-ball coaches — the answer?"

So black you can't see it.

gbjbaanb (229885) writes | 10 hours ago

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gbjbaanb (229885) writes "A British company is developing a new material that’s so black it absorbs all but 0.035 percent of the visual light, making it the darkest material ever created.

Of course, apart from making album covers, it conducts heat 7 times better than copper and is 10 times stronger than steel.

the pictures are the best, it looks like its sitting on some foil, but its grown on the foil which is all crinkled and bent — only people who have seen it say that it looks smooth because so little light is being reflected."

Link to Original Source

Elite group of researchers rule scientific publishing

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | 11 hours ago

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sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Publishing is one of the most ballyhooed metrics of scientific careers, and every researcher hates to have a gap in that part of his or her CV. Here’s some consolation: A new study finds that very few scientists—fewer than 1%—manage to publish a paper every year. But these 150,608 scientists dominate the research journals, having their names on 41% of all papers. Among the most highly cited work, this elite group can be found among the co-authors of 87% of papers. Students, meanwhile, may spend years on research that yields only one or a few papers. “[I]n these cases, the research system may be exploiting the work of millions of young scientists,” the authors conclude."
Link to Original Source

@Congressedits tweets anonymous Wikipedia edits from Capitol Hill

mpicpp (3454017) writes | yesterday

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mpicpp (3454017) writes "Ed Summers, an open source Web developer, recently saw a friend tweet about Parliament WikiEdits, a UK Twitter “bot” that watched for anonymous Wikipedia edits coming from within the British Parliament’s internal networks. Summers was immediately inspired to do the same thing for the US Congress.

“The simplicity of combining Wikipedia and Twitter in this way immediately struck me as a potentially useful transparency tool,” Summers wrote in his personal blog. “So using my experience on a previous side project [Wikistream, a Web application that watches Wikipedia editing activity], I quickly put together a short program that listens to all major language Wikipedias for anonymous edits from Congressional IP address ranges and tweets them.”

The stream for the bot, @congressedits, went live a day later, and it now provides real-time tweets when anonymous edits of Wikipedia pages are made. Summers also posted the code to GitHub so that others interested in creating similar Twitter bots can riff on his work.

So far, @congressedits hasn’t caught anything scandalous; most of the edits caught have been stylistic changes rather than factual ones. The most interesting edit found so far was to the Wikipedia article on horse head masks—adding a reference to President Obama shaking hands with a man in such a mask on a recent trip to Denver."

Link to Original Source

Utility wants $17,500 refund after failure to scrub negative search results

mpicpp (3454017) writes | yesterday

3

mpicpp (3454017) writes "Seattle City Light worked really hard to quash 2008 article, may sue Brand.com.

Seattle’s publicly-owned electrical utility, City Light, is now demanding a refund for the $17,500 that it paid to Brand.com in a botched effort to boost the online reputation of its highly-paid chief executive, Jorge Carrasco.

Brand.com "enhances online branding and clears negatives by blanketing search results with positive content" in an attempt to counteract unwanted search engine results. City Light signed a contract with the company in October 2013 and extended it in February 2014. The contracts authorized payments of up to $47,500.

Hamilton said that he first raised the issue of the utility’s online reputation when he was interviewing for the chief of staff job in early 2013.

“All I saw were negative stories about storms, outages and pay increases and I raised it as a concern during that interview,” he said. “And then after I started, [CEO Jorge Carrasco] and I discussed what we could do to more accurately represent the utility and what the utility is all about, because we didn't feel it was well represented online.”

Thus, the Brand.com contract. City Light says that it only ever thought Brand.com would help it place legitimate material in legitimate outlets—talking up some of the positive changes that have taken place at City Light during Carrasco's tenure. Instead, it appears to have received mostly bogus blog posts."

Link to Original Source

"Nano-Pixels" Hold Huge Potential For Flexible, Low-Power, High-Res Screens

Zothecula (1870348) writes | 2 days ago

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Zothecula (1870348) writes "The Retina displays featured on Apple's iPhone 4 and 5 models pack a pixel density of 326 ppi, with individual pixels measuring 78 micrometers. That might seem plenty good enough given the average human eye is unable to differentiate between the individual pixels, but scientists in the UK have now developed technology that could lead to extremely high-resolution displays that put such pixel densities to shame."
Link to Original Source

Source Code Leaked for Tinba Banking Trojan

msm1267 (2804139) writes | 2 days ago

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msm1267 (2804139) writes "The source code for Tinba, known as the smallest banker Trojan in circulation, has been posted on an underground forum. Researchers say that the files turned out to be the source code for version one of Tinba, which was identified in 2012, and is the original, privately sold version of the crimeware kit.

Tinba performs many of the same malicious functions as other banker Trojans, injecting itself into running processes on an infected machine, including the browser and explorer.exe. The malware is designed to steal financial information, including banking credentials and credit-card data and also makes each infected computer part of a botnet. Compromised machines communicate with command-and-control servers over encrypted channels. Tinba got its name from an abbreviation of “tiny banker”, and researchers say that it’s only about 20 KB in size."

Link to Original Source

Want To Ensure Your Personal Android Data Is Truly Wiped? Turn On Encryption

MojoKid (1002251) writes | yesterday

1

MojoKid (1002251) writes "We've been around the block enough times to know that outside of shredding a storage medium, all data is recoverable. It's just matter of time, money, and effort. However, it was still sobering to find out exactly how much data security firm Avast was able to recover from Android devices it purchased from eBay, which included everything from naked selfies to even a completed loan application. Does this mean we shouldn't ever sell the old handset? Luckily, the answer is no. Avast's self-serving study was to promote its Anti-Theft app available on Google Play. The free app comes with a wipe feature that overwrites all files, thereby making them invisible to casual recovery methods. That's one approach. There's another solution that's incredibly easy and doesn't require downloading and installing anything. Before you sell your Android phone on eBay, Craigslist, or wherever, enable encryption and wait for it to encrypt the on board storage. After that, perform a wipe and reset as normal, which will obliterate the encryption key and ensure the data on your device can't be read. This may not work on certain devices, which will ask you to decrypt data before wiping but most should follow this convention just fine."
Link to Original Source

New Technology Uses Cellular Towers for Super Accurate Weather Measurements

Iddo Genuth (903542) writes | yesterday

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Iddo Genuth (903542) writes "Israeli scientists from the Tel Aviv University perfected a method for using cell phone service towers microwave emitters to measure rain, snow and even (for the first time ) detect fog with great accuracy over vast areas in real time.

The research team members have analyzed endless amounts of raw cellular data and developed more accurate ways to measure meteorological information and added more parameters that they can now measure using their growing database. When combined with existing meteorological monitoring technologies such as radars and local ground based weather stations, the results show unprecedented level of accuracy that can give better and further weather forecast as well as special warnings about upcoming floods, fog and hail which can affect both people and crop production."

Link to Original Source

Phillip K. Dick's "Radio Free Albemuth" movie is now available on Yekra.com

DarkStarZumaBeach (668886) writes | yesterday

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DarkStarZumaBeach (668886) writes "Another Phillip K. Dick science fiction novel is now a movie — "Radio Free Albemuth" is adapted by and directed by John Alan Simon and produced by Open Pictures.

It is appearing at select film festivals — but it is already available for Internet on-line streaming and DVD from Yekra.com

"Radio Free Albemuth" stars Jonathan Scarfe as "Nick Brady" — a music producer who discovers a whole new genre of music — coming from near-Earth orbit — from a voice claiming to be V.A.L.I.S. — Vast Active Living Intelligence System — purportedly floating in an alien satellite from the star system Albemuth.

The problem is that Nick and his wife Rachel (played by Kathryn Winnick) are living in a United States run by a paranoid President Ferris F. Fremont (played by Scott Wilson) who has established an oppressive FBI-enforced security regime authorized by staged attacks by a manufactured terrorist group named "ARAMCHEK."

What Nick and Rachel will discover is that there is no "Aramchek" — only a loosely knit resistance group of disorganized people — only linked by the intoxicating music of V.A.L.I.S. — especially when it is sung by the sensuous Sylvia, as played by the one and only Alanis Morissette in her first starring movie role.

And, when President Fremont discovers the music has subliminal messages recruiting more people to V.A.L.I.S., the iron glove of his political action committee, "The Friends of the American People", comes down on Nick, Rachel, and his new resistance friends.

Watch this science fiction thriller — and you will come to understand why the Hollywood studio system and the TV networks refused to distribute this film: They don't want to be another Julian Assange or Edward Snowden, while THEY do not want you to see it. EVER.

"Radio Free Albemuth" is the TRUE "Message of Hope — From the STARS ..."

Catch it while you still can ...

----
A special screening of Radio Free Albemuth in #Milwaukee will be on July 14, 2014, at 7 pm at the Landmark Downer with writer/director John Alan Simon and producer Elizabeth Karr.

For latest information on select screenings — see: Radio Free Albemuth on Facebook.
----
The Official Movie Web Site is here: Radio Free Albemuth"

Link to Original Source

Highly respected engingeering school graduates more women than men

kevmeister (979231) writes | yesterday

3

kevmeister (979231) writes "Harvey Mudd College, a highly regarded engineering school in Claremont, California, announced that 56% of the latest graduating engineering class was female.

The article makes it clear that Harvey Mudd did put substantial effort into increasing female participation in STEM majors and that the overall graduating class or 2014 was almost half women.

Looks like (with effort) it is possible to get women interested in STEM."

Israel's Iron Dome rocket defense system is high-tech. So is the PR campaign

Lasrick (2629253) writes | 2 days ago

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Lasrick (2629253) writes "It isn't as if real analysis of Israel's "Iron Dome" isn't available, but invariably, whenever Israel has a skirmish the media is filled with glowing reports of how well the system works, and we always find out months later that the numbers were exaggerated. John Mecklin at the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists looks at the coverage of Iron Dome in the recent exchanges between Israel and Hamas and finds the pattern is repeating itself. However, 'Ted Postol, an MIT-based missile defense expert and frequent Bulletin contributor, provided a dose of context to the Iron Dome coverage in a National Public Radio interview Wednesday. "We can tell, for sure, from video images and even photographs that the Iron Dome system is not working very well at all,"' Includes a good explanation of the differences between Iron Dome (a 'rocket defense system') and missile defense systems pushed by the US."
Link to Original Source

Take a Picture just by thinking about it, using Google Glass with MindRDR App.

rtoz (2530056) writes | 2 days ago

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rtoz (2530056) writes "A London based company "This Place" is launching a new app "MindRDR" for providing one more way for controlling Google Glass. It will allow the users to control the Google Glass by their thoughts.

This MindRDR application bridges the Neurosky EEG biosensor and Google Glass. It allows users to take photos and share them on Twitter and Facebook by simply using brainwaves alone.

"This Place" has put the code of this app on GitHub for others to use it and expand on it."

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