Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

What does the Slashdot journal do?

MoonlessNights (3526789) writes | 1 minute ago

User Journal 0

I am having trouble finding information explaining what this feature does. The UI makes it sound almost like it is connected to the submission flow but also seems to come across more like a minimalist blogging system.

Is it both: a blogging system which can be easily promoted to a front-page story, if others find it insightful?

If anyone can point me to some authoritative information, that would really help.

A Fictional Compression Metric Moves Into the Real World

Tekla Perry (3034735) writes | 13 minutes ago

0

Tekla Perry (3034735) writes "The "Weissman Score"—created for HBO's Silicon Valley to add dramatic flair to the show's race to build the best compression algorithm—creates a single score by considering both the amount of compression and the compression speed. While it was created for a TV show, it does really work, and it's quickly migrating into academia. Computer science and engineering students will begin to encounter the Weissman Score in the classroom this fall."
Link to Original Source

New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer's, related diseases

vinces99 (2792707) writes | 20 minutes ago

0

vinces99 (2792707) writes "There is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, but the research community is one step closer to finding treatment. University of Washington bioengineers have a designed a peptide structure that can stop the harmful changes of the body’s normal proteins into a state that’s linked to widespread diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and Lou Gehrig’s disease. The synthetic molecule blocks these proteins as they shift from their normal state into an abnormally folded form by targeting a toxic intermediate phase. The discovery of a protein blocker could lead to ways to diagnose and even treat a large swath of diseases that are hard to pin down and rarely have a cure.

“If you can truly catch and neutralize the toxic version of these proteins, then you hopefully never get any further damage in the body,” said senior author Valerie Daggett, a UW professor of bioengineering. “What’s critical with this and what has never been done before is that a single peptide sequence will work against the toxic versions of a number of different amyloid proteins and peptides, regardless of their amino acid sequence or the normal 3-D structures.”"

Link to Original Source

New Findings On Graphene As A Conductor With IC Components

ClockEndGooner (1323377) writes | about half an hour ago

0

ClockEndGooner (1323377) writes "Philadelphia's NPR affiliate, WHYY FM, reported today on their Newsworks program that a research team at the University of Pennsylvania have released their preliminary findings on the use of graphene as a conductor in the next generation of computer chips. "It's very, very strong mechanically, and it is an excellent electronic material that might be used in future computer chips," said Charlie Johnson, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Pennsylvania. From the article: Future graphene transistors, Johnson said, are likely to be only tens of atoms across."

A Personal Electronic Aura Could be the Answer to Password Hell

DavidGilbert99 (2607235) writes | about half an hour ago

0

DavidGilbert99 (2607235) writes "Imagine using chips implanted in accessories like glasses, shoes and belts — or even under your skin — to generate a personal electronic aura. This would be your own personal safe zone, and only inside this would your electronics work, including a device which logs and stores thousands of passwords. This is the vision of a Cambridge University professor who wants to create an Electronic Aura for everyone."
Link to Original Source

AWS Cognito and Enterprise Mobile Application Development

Celeste1108 (3738393) writes | about half an hour ago

0

Celeste1108 (3738393) writes "Let’s look at the world of mobile app development. On one end of the spectrum, there are brand new mobile applications or services, which are built from scratch and in almost all cases use one of our existing public user identities (google, Facebook, twitter etc.). Most of these applications are consumer oriented like gaming apps, location based search apps, collaboration/messaging and probably many more, that if I could speculate, I would be starting my own mobile app company."
Link to Original Source

State governments consider regulating digital currency

SonicSpike (242293) writes | 37 minutes ago

1

SonicSpike (242293) writes "Now that consumers can use digital currencies like bitcoin to buy rugs from Overstock.com, pay for Peruvian pork sandwiches from a food truck in Washington, D.C. and even make donations to political action committees, states are beginning to explore how to regulate the emerging industry.

Digital currencies — also known as virtual currencies or cash for the Internet —allow people to transfer value over the Internet, but are not legal tender. Because they don’t require third-party intermediaries such as credit card companies or PayPal, merchants and consumers can avoid the fees typically associated with traditional payment systems.

Advocates of virtual currencies also say that because personal information is not tied to transactions, digital currencies are less prone to identity theft.

With about $7.8 billion in circulation, bitcoin is the most widely used digital currency; others include Litecoin and Peercoin. All are examples of cryptocurrencies, a subset of digital currencies that rely on cryptography to function.

“As far as we know, most state laws are completely silent on this topic,” said David J. Cotney, chairman of the Conference of State Bank Supervisors’ Emerging Payments Task Force, which in March began exploring virtual currency.

Among the questions the task force will consider, Cotney said, is whether bitcoins should be classified as currencies, investment securities or commodities, which could determine which regulators should apply.

New York became the first state to propose regulations for the digital currency industry when it unveiled earlier this month a broad-ranging proposal that aims to address consumer protection, money laundering and cybersecurity.

Until recently, California prohibited the use of alternative currencies. Last month, Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation to allow the use of alternative currencies, including digital currencies.

The Texas Department of Banking said in April Texas will not treat bitcoin and other digital currencies as money. “What it means, from our perspective, is just simply that it’s not money for the purposes of money transmission or currency exchange,” said Daniel Wood, an assistant general counsel in the department. “A bitcoin is basically property.” However, most bitcoin exchanges would be considered money transmitters and exchanging digital currency for sovereign currency would in most cases be considered money transmission.

Last month, the Kansas Office of the State Bank Commissioner issued a guidance that, like Texas, concluded that digital currencies are not considered money under the Kansas Money Transmitter Act."

Link to Original Source

New tools help neuroscientists analyze 'big data'

mspohr (589790) writes | 46 minutes ago

0

mspohr (589790) writes ""New technologies for monitoring brain activity are generating unprecedented quantities of information. That data may hold new insights into how the brain works — but only if researchers can interpret it. To help make sense of the data, neuroscientists can now harness the power of distributed computing with Thunder, a library of tools developed at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus.
"Freeman chose to build on a new platform called Spark. Developed at the University of California, Berkeley's AMPLab, Spark is rapidly becoming a favored tool for large-scale computing across industry, Freeman says. Spark's capabilities for data caching eliminates the bottleneck of loading a complete data set for all but the initial step, making it well-suited for interactive, exploratory analysis, and for complex algorithms requiring repeated operations on the same data. And Spark's elegant and versatile application programming interfaces (APIs) help simplify development. Thunder uses the Python API, which Freeman hopes will make it particularly easy for others to adopt, given Python's increasing use in neuroscience and data science.
Researchers can find everything they need to begin using the open source library of tools at http://freeman-lab.github.io/t...
To make Spark suitable for analyzing a broad range of neuroscience data — information about connectivity and activity collected from different organisms and with different techniques — Freeman first developed standardized representations of data that were amenable to distributed computing. He then worked to express typical neuroscience workflows into the computational language of Spark.""

Link to Original Source

STEM worker shortage is IT industry fantasy

Tailhook (98486) writes | 1 hour ago

1

Tailhook (98486) writes "Ron Hira, professor of public policy at Howard University and Paula Stephan is a professor of economics at Georgia State University; `As longtime researchers of the STEM workforce and immigration who have separately done in-depth analyses on these issues, and having no self-interest in the outcomes of the legislative debate, we feel compelled to report that none of us has been able to find any credible evidence to support the IT industry's assertions of labor shortages.' — `there is a remarkable concurrence among a wide range of researchers that there is an ample supply of American workers (native and immigrant, citizen and permanent resident) who are willing and qualified to fill the high-skill jobs in this country. The only real disagreement is whether supply is two or three times larger than the demand.'"
Link to Original Source

Internet Census 2012 Data Examined: Authentic but Chaotic and Unetical

Anonymous Coward writes | 1 hour ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "A team of researchers at the TU Berlin and RWTH Aachen presented an analysis of the Internet Census 2012 data set in the July edition of the ACM Sigcomm Computer Communication Review journal. After its release on March 17, 2013 by an anonymous author, the Internet Census data created an immediate media buzz, mainly due to its unethical data collection methodology that exploited default passwords to form the Carna botnet.
The now published analysis suggests that the released data set is authentic and not faked, but also reveals a rather chaotic picture. The Census suffers from a number of methodological flaws and also lacks meta-data information, which renders the data unusable for many further analyses. As a result, the researchers have not been able to verify several claims that the anonymous author(s) made in the published Internet Census report. The researchers also point to similar but legal efforts measuring the Internet and remark that the illegally measured Internet Census 2012 is not only unethical but might have been overrated by the press."

Link to Original Source

U.K. team claims breakthrough in universal cancer test

Anonymous Coward writes | 1 hour ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "U.K. researchers say they've devised a simple blood test that can be used to diagnose whether people have cancer or not. The Lymphocyte Genome Sensitivity (LGS) test looks at white blood cells and measures the damage caused to their DNA when subjected to different intensities of ultraviolet light (UVA), which is known to damage DNA. The results of the empirical study show a distinction between the damage to the white blood cells from patients with cancer, with pre-cancerous conditions and from healthy patients. “Whilst the numbers of people we tested are, in epidemiological terms, quite small (208), in molecular epidemiological terms, the results are powerful," said the team's lead researcher. "We’ve identified significant differences between the healthy volunteers, suspected cancer patients and confirmed cancer patients of mixed ages at a statistically significant level .... This means that the possibility of these results happening by chance is 1 in 1000." The research is published online in the FASEB Journal, the US Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology."
Link to Original Source

NBC's Tour de France coverage -- three stars and five suggestions

lpress (707742) writes | 1 hour ago

0

lpress (707742) writes "NBC covers major sporting events like the Olympics on line and this review looks at their coverage of the just-completed Tour de France bike race. At first, new media mimic old media and NBC's earlier attempts at covering live sporting events online was shaped by their traditional TV coverage — shoot video and insert commercials. This year, they have developed good ancillary data capability to go along with the video and dropped the commercials for a flat fee. Once they get the video and data synchronized and archived, and I can lean back and watch the video or lean forward and play with the data, I'll give them five stars."

Attackers Install DDoS Bots On Amazon Cloud

itwbennett (1594911) writes | 2 hours ago

0

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Attackers are exploiting a vulnerability in distributed search engine software Elasticsearch to install DDoS malware on Amazon and possibly other cloud servers. Last week security researchers from Kaspersky Lab found new variants of Mayday, a Trojan program for Linux that's used to launch distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks. The malware supports several DDoS techniques, including DNS amplification. One of the new Mayday variants was found running on compromised Amazon EC2 server instances, but this is not the only platform being misused, said Kaspersky Lab researcher Kurt Baumgartner Friday in a blog post."
Link to Original Source

Google's mapping service under scanner in India

hypnosec (2231454) writes | 2 hours ago

0

hypnosec (2231454) writes "The Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI), India has ordered for a preliminary enquiry (PE) against Google for violating Indian laws by mapping sensitive areas and defence installations in the country. As per the PE, registered on the basis of a complaint made by Surveyor General of India’s office to the Union Home Ministry, Google has been accused of organizing a mapping competition dubbed ‘Mapathon’ in February-March 2013 without taking prior permission from Survey of India, country’s official mapping agency. The mapping competition required citizens to map their neighbourhoods, especially details related to hospitals and restaurants. The Survey of India (SoI), alarmed by the event, asked the company to share its event details. While going through the details the watch dog found that there were several coordinates having details of sensitive defence installations which are out of the public domain."
Link to Original Source

Collaboration isn't what they taught you in school

jenwike (2888285) writes | 2 hours ago

0

jenwike (2888285) writes "Throughout most of my education, I was taught that collaboration was cheating. With the exception of teacher-sanctioned group projects, I had learned that working with others to solve problems was not acceptable. So, when I got to college and the first assignment in my computer science class was to read an article about the benefits of pairwise programming and open source, I was very confused. Fast forward about nine months. I applied for a marketing internship at Red Hat and had just been offered the job. Here's what I learned about real collaboration in the workplace. (by Kristen DeMaria)"
Link to Original Source

Fove Head Mounted Display Expands Possibilities With Eye-Tracking Technology

Zothecula (1870348) writes | 2 hours ago

0

Zothecula (1870348) writes "Back in 2011, Google filed a patent for an unlock system for Google Glass that would use eye-tracking technology. Tokyo-based startup Fove believes the combination of a head mounted display (HMD) and eye-tracking technology has far wider applications and is working on just such a device aimed at the consumer market. Microsoft apparently agrees, having accepted the company into its Ventures Accelerator in London earlier this month."
Link to Original Source

Why We Said Goodbye to Fossil-Fuel Investments

mdsolar (1045926) writes | 2 hours ago

0

mdsolar (1045926) writes ""This spring, after considerable study, Pitzer College announced a comprehensive and ambitious climate-action plan, including a commitment to divest the endowment of substantially all fossil-fuel-company stocks by the end of 2014. It was not a decision made lightly, but one that we felt was a key step in more fully aligning the college’s actions with its mission and values.

Our deliberations began last October, when the Board of Trustees formed a working group, which I chaired, composed of students, faculty and staff members, and trustees. In the course of our discussions, we confronted a wide variety of objections to divestment, many raised by other colleges and universities that have rejected it. Taking the road less traveled required much research and soul-searching, but, personally, I can say it was well worth the journey.

As other colleges consider fossil-fuel divestment and confront those objections, I would like to share the objections and our responses, which helped shape Pitzer’s decision...""

Link to Original Source

Stanford team creates stable Lithium Anode using Honeycomb Film

puddingebola (2036796) writes | 3 hours ago

0

puddingebola (2036796) writes "A team at Stanford has created a stable Lithium anode battery using a carbon honeycomb film. The film is described as a nanosphere layer that allows for the expansion of Lithium during use, and is suitable as a barrier between anode and cathode. Use of a lithium anode improves the coulombic efficiency and could result in longer range batteries for cars."
Link to Original Source

Oracle Offers Custom Intel Chips And Unanticipated Costs

jfruh (300774) writes | 3 hours ago

0

jfruh (300774) writes "For some time, Intel has been offering custom-tweaked chips to big customers. While most of the companies that have taken them up on this offer, like Facebook and eBay, put the chips into servers meant for internal use, Oracle will now be selling systems running on custom Xeons directly to end users. Those customers need to be careful about how they configure those systems, though: in the new Oracle 12c, the in-memory database option, which costs $23,000 per processor, is turned on by default."
Link to Original Source

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...