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teenporn videos

Anonymous Coward writes | 1 minute ago

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An anonymous reader writes "The frustrating majority of mother and father believe their kid has never seen adult. However, a 2003 Sydney Institution research citied in the Sydney Age content mentioned above revealed that 84 % of guys and 60 % of ladies had accessibility sex websites. A 2006 Sydney research of youths older 13 to 16 found that 92 % of guys and 61 % of ladies had been revealed to adult online."
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8 Car Insurance Myths You Should Send to the Junkyard

shadmars09 (3538131) writes | about half an hour ago

0

shadmars09 (3538131) writes "Dyman Associates Insurance Group of Companies


From the old fiction about red cars costing more to insure, to the one about rates dropping when you turn 25, to the idea that "full coverage" means you get a new car after a crash, myths about car insurance abound. And they're easy enough to take at face value — until you look at the facts. Not falling for these eight insurance fables could save you some cash.

1. "Full coverage" will get me a new car if I crash. Your auto repair shop may thank you for having collision and comprehensive coverage, because they'll get paid by your insurer for fixing your car. But however you define "full" coverage, it won't equate to you getting a new car after you crash. Insurance is meant to put you back to where you were, not improve upon it, so you won't be getting a better car than you had.

If your car insurance agent tells you that you have "full coverage", ask what that entails. It could include liability, property damage and rental reimbursement, says Shane Fischer, an attorney in Winter Park, Fla. "Unfortunately, most people who claim to have 'full coverage' are people of modest incomes who buy the cheapest policy their state legally allows," he says. "This can leave them without uninsured motorist coverage if they're a victim of a hit and run, without a rental car if theirs is damaged in a crash or personally responsible for thousands in medical bills if they don't have enough liability coverage."

Full coverage isn't an insurance term agents use, says Adam Lyons, CEO of The Zebra, a digital auto insurance agency. Collision insurance covers damage to your vehicle in an accident. Comprehensive covers non-accident damage, such as from theft and fire. If you want medical coverage and other protections, you'll have to spell that out for your agent, Lyons says.

2. My rates will go up if I get a traffic ticket. Not always, says Matthew Neely, owner of Eco Insurance Group in Las Vegas. A client who has six speeding tickets in the past three years hasn't had his rate go up, he notes.

Here's how it works, Neely says: Some companies only ask for a record of an applicant's driving history when he or she first sign up for a policy. Motor Vehicle Reports cost $3 to $28, depending on the state. "These charges can get very expensive for insurance companies, so a lot of the time the carrier will randomly select households and run the MVRs," he says. "If you are lucky enough, the insurance company will not find out about your speeding habit. However, if you let your insurance lapse, get into an accident or change insurance carriers, the carrier will run the MVR."

3. Thieves prefer new or fancy cars. Not true, points out Lyons. Of the 10 most frequently stolen cars, the most stolen in 2012 was the 1996 Honda Accord, according to the National Insurance Crime Bureau. You might have the latest and fanciest car, but a 1996 Accord is preferable for catalytic converters and other parts that are more in demand. To protect your car against theft, get comprehensive insurance.

4. My red car will cost more to insure. False. Insurers don't care what color your car is and they don't ask for that information. Police might spot a speeding red car quicker than a white one, but an insurer factors in other aspects of your car, such as model, make, year and engine size.

5. The longer you are with an insurance company, the lower your rate will be. This is half true, Neely says. Longevity discounts are sometimes offered to policyholders, but it doesn't shelter them from increased costs, he says. "Most of the time, the moment you make a claim, this discount will disappear, and it does not guarantee your rate will not increase," Neely says.

6. My credit score has nothing to do with my car insurance rate. In most cases it's the biggest factor of determine your rate, right after your driving record, Neely says. Studies have shown that individuals with good credit get in fewer accidents, he says, though insurers in California, Hawaii and Massachusetts can's use credit as a rating factor.

7. No fault means I am not at fault. In most states "no fault" simply means that each insurance company involved pays for their respective policyholders injury-related bills, regardless of who is at fault, Neely says. This helps keep the overall cost of car insurance down.

8. Rates drop at age 25. Rating factors vary by state, but in North Carolina, the myth is wrong because age isn't a factor in pricing, says Jonathan Peele, president of Coastline Insurance Associates of North Carolina. Instead, insurers use the years of experience to determine the rate. Once the driver has more than three years of driving experience, the insurer can't surcharge the premium, he says. Less experienced drivers are charged more for car insurance because they have a higher risk."

maqui berry review

Anonymous Coward writes | about half an hour ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Maqui Berry (Aristotelia chilensis) is a strongly purple berry that develops wild all around parts of southern Chile.

Aristotelia chilensis is a species of the Elaeocarpaceae family native to the Valdivian temperate rainforests of Chile and adjacent regions of southern Argentina. Maqui is sparsely cultivated.

Maqui is touted as a natural remedy for several health conditions, including arthritis and high cholesterol. In addition, maqui is purported to protect against some forms of cancer (such as colon cancer) and a number of inflammation-related diseases (including diabetes and heart disease)."

Link to Original Source

SpaceX Launches Cargo to Space Station and Tries Rocket Recovery - NBCNews.com

feedfeeder (1749978) writes | 1 hour ago

0


Voice of America

SpaceX Launches Cargo to Space Station and Tries Rocket Recovery
NBCNews.com
SpaceX launched more than two tons of cargo to the International Space Station — and also conducted an experiment in rocket recovery. The company's Falcon 9 rocket lifted off into the cloudy skies over Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 3:25 p.m. ET,...
SpaceX launches cargo ship to space stationWaco Tribune-Herald
SpaceX Rocket Lifts Off for Space Station Cargo RunVoice of America
SpaceX making Easter delivery of mating flies, food, germs, a spacesuit and ... Sydney Morning Herald
GlobalPost-KTXS
all 286 news articles

Link to Original Source

Is there a place for me in this world?

Anonymous Coward writes | 1 hour ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "I'm mildly autistic and in my mid 30s. I know I'm not the smartest person ever — not even close — but I'm pretty smart: perfect scores on SAT, etc., way back in high school and a PhD from a private research university you've heard of. I don't consider intelligence a virtue (in contrast to, say, ethical living); it's just what I have, and that's that. There are plenty of things I lack. Anyway, I've made myself very good at applied math and scientific computing. For years, without ever tiring, I've worked approximately 6.5 days a week all but approximately 4 of my waking hours per day. I work at a research university as research staff, and my focus is on producing high-quality, efficient, relevant scientific software. But funding is tough. I'm terrible at selling myself. I have a hard time writing proposals because when I work on mushy tasks, I become depressed and generally bent out of shape. My question: Is it possible to find a place where I can do exactly what I do best and keeps me stable — analyze and develop mathematical algorithms and software — without ever having to do other stuff and, in particular, without being good at presenting myself? I don't care about salary beyond keeping up my frugal lifestyle and saving a sufficient amount to maintain that frugal lifestyle until I die. Ideas? Or do we simply live in a world where we all have to sell what we do no matter what? Thanks for your thoughts."

One week of OpenSSL cleanup

Anonymous Coward writes | 2 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "OpenBSD Journal reports, "After the news of heartbleed broke early last week, the OpenBSD team dove in and started axing it up into shape[...] All combined, there've been over 250 commits cleaning up OpenSSL. In one week."

One developer stated in a response to comments about a new project name, "This is not about a fancy name. This is about realizing belatedly that code we thought of good quality was not even decent, and ended up becoming too complex and unmaintainable. So now we are hurrying to remove everything in the way of exposing the concrete guts of the code, fixing the bad practices inherited from the way we were doing security 15+ years ago""

Link to Original Source

SpaceX rocket to make Easter delivery of supplies to International Space Station

feedfeeder (1749978) writes | 3 hours ago

0


SFGate

SpaceX rocket to make Easter delivery of supplies to International Space Station
Washington Post
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A SpaceX supply ship rocketed toward the International Space Station on Friday, setting the stage for an Easter morning delivery of much-needed food, space suit and robot parts, and urgent repairs later in the week. Following its...
SpaceX Dragon On Its Way to the ISSPC Magazine
SpaceX rocket blasts off for space stationUSA TODAY
SpaceX launches Falcon 9 rocket carrying crucial cargo to ISSCNET
Reuters-NBCNews.com-New Scientist
all 256 news articles

Link to Original Source

Bookies Predict the Future of Tech

machineghost (622031) writes | 4 hours ago

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machineghost (622031) writes "It's one thing to make predictions about the future of tech; that happens all the time on Slashdot. But it's quite a different thing to put money on the line to back up those predictions, which is exactly what this British bookie has done. Think you know whether Google Glass will beat the iPhone, or whether we'll be ready to go to Mars and back by 2020? Now's your chance to capitalize on those predictions!"

Minerva CEO Details His High-Tech Plan to Disrupt Universities

waderoush (1271548) writes | 4 hours ago

0

waderoush (1271548) writes "In April 2012, former Snapfish CEO Ben Nelson provoked both praise and skepticism by announcing that he’d raised $25 million from venture firm Benchmark to start the Minerva Project, a new kind of university where students will live together but all class seminars will take place over a Google Hangouts-style video conferencing system. Two years later, there are answers – or the beginnings of answers – to many of the questions observers have raised about the project, on everything from the way the seminars will be organized to how much tuition the San Francisco-based university will charge and how it's gaining accreditation. And in an interview published today, Nelson share more details about how Minerva plans to use technology to improve teaching quality. ‘If a student wants football and Greek life and not doing any work for class, they have every single Ivy League university to choose from,’ Nelson says. ‘That is not what we provide. Similarly, there are faculty who want to do research and get in front of a lecture hall and regurgitate the same lecture they’ve been giving for 20 years. We have a different model,’ based on extensive faculty review of video recordings of the seminars, to make sure students are picking up key concepts. Last month Minerva admitted 45 students to its founding class, and in September it expects to welcome 19 of them to its Nob Hill residence hall."
Link to Original Source

Windows Defender update crashes Windows ..

Anonymous Coward writes | 5 hours ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft has fixed a snafu with Windows Defender that took down thousands of business PCs and servers running Windows XP and Server 2003 .. The only solution to getting affected machines back up was to uninstall the updated signatures ..."
Link to Original Source

SpaceX rocket blasts off for space station - USA TODAY

feedfeeder (1749978) writes | 5 hours ago

0


Washington Post

SpaceX rocket blasts off for space station
USA TODAY
MELBOURNE, Fla. -- A SpaceX cargo capsule is on its way to an Easter Sunday rendezvous with the International Space Station after a Friday afternoon blastoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. SpaceX's 208-foot Falcon 9 roared from its pad at 3:25...
SpaceX Blasts Off and Tries a Rocket RecoveryNBCNews.com
SpaceX launches Falcon 9 rocket carrying crucial cargo to ISSCNET
SpaceX rocket lifts off for space station cargo runReuters
PCWorld-Register-Washington Post
all 198 news articles

Link to Original Source

There's got to be more than the Standard Model

StartsWithABang (3485481) writes | 5 hours ago

0

StartsWithABang (3485481) writes "The Standard Model of particle physics is perhaps the most successful physical theory of our Universe, and with the discovery and measurement of the Higgs boson, may be all there is as far as fundamental particles accessible through terrestrial accelerator physics. But there are at least five verified observations we've made, many in a variety of ways, that demonstrably show that the Standard Model cannot be all there is to the Universe. Here are the top 5 signs of new physics."

New Cody Wilson interview: Happiness is a 3D Printed Gun

Anonymous Coward writes | 6 hours ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Cody Wilson details his conflict with the State Department over 3-D printable guns in this new interview with ReasonTV.

In this video, he discusses:

How 3-D printing will render gun control laws obsolete and unenforceable.
Why Dark Wallet, his new crypto-currency, is much more subversive than Bitcoin.
His legal defense, headed by Alan Gura (attorney in District of Columbia v. Heller and McDonald v. Chicago).
His forthcoming book about anarchy and the future."

Link to Original Source

How Nest and FitBit Might Spy on You For Cash

Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes | 7 hours ago

0

Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "Forbes offers up a comforting little story about how Nest and FitBit are planning on turning user data in a multi-billion-dollar business. "Smart-thermostat maker Nest Labs (which is being acquired by Google for $3.2 billion) has quietly built a side business managing the energy consumption of a slice of its customers on behalf of electric companies," reads the article. "In wearables, health tracker Fitbit is selling companies the tracking bracelets and analytics services to better manage their health care budgets, and its rival Jawbone may be preparing to do the same." As many a wit has said over the years: If you're not paying, you're the product. But if Forbes is right, wearable-electronics companies may have discovered a sweeter deal: paying customers on one side, and companies paying for those customers' data on the other. Will most consumers actually care, though?"
Link to Original Source

DARPA developing the ultimate auto-pilot software

coondoggie (973519) writes | 7 hours ago

0

coondoggie (973519) writes "Call it the ultimate auto-pilot — an automated system that can help take care of all phases of aircraft flight-even perhaps helping pilots overcome system failures in-flight. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) will in May detail a new program called Aircrew Labor In-Cockpit Automation System (ALIAS) that would build upon what the agency called the considerable advances that have been made in aircraft automation systems over the past 50 years, as well as the advances made in remotely piloted aircraft automation, to help reduce pilot workload, augment mission performance and improve aircraft safety."
Link to Original Source

Microsoft Plans $1 Billion Server Farm in Iowa

1sockchuck (826398) writes | 7 hours ago

0

1sockchuck (826398) writes "Microsoft will invest $1.1 billion to build a massive new server farm in Iowa, not far from an existing data center in West Des Moines. The 1.2 million square foot campus will be one of the biggest in the history of the data center industry. It further enhances Iowa's status as the data center capital of the Midwest,, with Google and Facebook also operating huge server farms in the state."
Link to Original Source

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