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CDC caught in scientific fraud

justthinkit (954982) writes | 17 minutes ago

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justthinkit (954982) writes "With a full headline of "CDC caught in scientific fraud, perpetrating vaccine violence against blacks in shocking eugenics cover-up", the waiting begins. The evidence is coming from a whistleblower, and will be "made public in mere days." The story continues with "MMR vaccine causes autism"...and the CDC knew it. For 12 years. So are Slashdotters still going to say vaccines are harmless? This is almost sacred ground for some."
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UPS: We've Been Hacked

paysonwelch (2505012) writes | 22 minutes ago

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paysonwelch (2505012) writes "The United Parcel Service announced Wednesday that customersâ(TM) credit and debit card information at 51 franchises in 24 states may have been compromised. There are 4,470 franchised center locations throughout the U.S., according to UPS.

The malware began to infiltrate the system as early as January 20, but the majority of the attacks began after March 26. UPS says the threat was eliminated as of August 11 and that customers can shop safely at all locations."

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Cause of global warming 'hiatus' found deep in the Atlantic

vinces99 (2792707) writes | 2 hours ago

2

vinces99 (2792707) writes "Following rapid warming in the late 20th century, this century has so far seen surprisingly little increase in the average temperature at the Earth’s surface. More than a dozen theories have now been proposed for the so-called global warming hiatus, ranging from air pollution to volcanoes to sunspots. New research from the University of Washington shows the heat absent from the surface is plunging deep in the north and south Atlantic Ocean, and is part of a naturally occurring cycle. The study is published Aug. 22 in Science.

Subsurface ocean warming explains why global average air temperatures have flatlined since 1999, despite greenhouse gases trapping more solar heat at the Earth’s surface. “Every week there’s a new explanation of the hiatus,” said corresponding author Ka-Kit Tung, a UW professor of applied mathematics and adjunct faculty member in atmospheric sciences. “Many of the earlier papers had necessarily focused on symptoms at the surface of the Earth, where we see many different and related phenomena. We looked at observations in the ocean to try to find the underlying cause.”

What they found is that a slow-moving current in the Atlantic, which carries heat between the two poles, sped up earlier this century to draw heat down almost a mile (1,500 meters). Most previous studies focused on shorter-term variability or particles that could block incoming sunlight, but they could not explain the massive amount of heat missing for more than a decade."

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What's After Big Data?

gthuang88 (3752041) writes | 2 hours ago

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gthuang88 (3752041) writes "As the marketing hype around “big data” subsides, a recent wave of startups is solving a new class of data-related problems and showing where the field is headed. Niche analytics companies like RStudio, Vast, and FarmLink are trying to provide insights for specific industries such as finance, real estate, and agriculture. Data-wrangling software from startups like Tamr and Trifacta is targeting enterprises looking to find and prep corporate data. And heavily funded startups such as Actifio and DataGravity are trying to make data-storage systems smarter. Together, these efforts highlight where emerging data technologies might actually be used in the business world."
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The star that exploded at the dawn of time

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | 2 hours ago

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sciencehabit (1205606) writes "To probe the dawn of time, astronomers usually peer far away; but now they've made a notable discovery close to home. An ancient star a mere thousand light-years from Earth bears chemical elements that may have been forged by the death of a star that was both extremely massive and one of the first to arise after the big bang. If confirmed, the finding means that some of the universe’s first stars were so massive they died in exceptionally violent explosions that altered the growth of early galaxies."
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Study of Internet censorship reveals the deepest fears of China's government

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | 2 hours ago

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sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Behind China’s vaunted Internet censorship are throngs of specialized police officers, fake commentators, and ever-changing technologies. But China watchers have puzzled over the system’s modus operandi. Some posts are swiftly culled, whereas others on seemingly more sensitive topics are left untouched. In the most revealing study yet of Chinese censorship, researchers describe today how they peered behind the curtain to find out what China’s censors—and presumably the government officials operating behind the scenes—fear most."
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I Contain Multitudes

Anonymous Coward writes | 3 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Your DNA is supposed to be your blueprint, your unique master code, identical in every one of your tens of trillions of cells. It is why you are you, indivisible and whole, consistent from tip to toe.

But that’s really just a biological fairy tale. In reality, you are an assemblage of genetically distinctive cells, some of which have radically different operating instructions. This fact has only become clear in the last decade. Even though each of your cells supposedly contains a replica of the DNA in the fertilized egg that began your life, mutations, copying errors and editing mistakes began modifying that code as soon as your zygote self began to divide. In your adult body, your DNA is peppered by pinpoint mutations, riddled with repeated or rearranged or missing information, even lacking huge chromosome-sized chunks. Your data is hopelessly corrupt."

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Book review: Social Engineering in IT Security Tools, Tactics, and Techniques

benrothke (2577567) writes | 2 days ago

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benrothke (2577567) writes "Title: Social Engineering in IT Security Tools, Tactics, and Techniques

Author: Sharon Conheady

Pages: 272

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Osborne Media

Rating: 8/10

Reviewer: Ben Rothke

ISBN: 978-0071818469

Summary: Great resource on which to build a social engineering testing program



When I got a copy of Social Engineering in IT Security Tools, Tactics, and Techniquesby Sharon Conheady, my first thought was that it likely could not have much that Christopher Hadnagy didn't already detail in the definitive text on the topic: Social Engineering: The Art of Human Hacking. Obviously Hadnagy thought differently, as he wrote the forward to the book; which he found to be a valuable resource.



While there is overlap between the two books; Hadnagy's book takes a somewhat more aggressive tool-based approach, while Conheady take a somewhat more passive, purely social approach to the topic. There are many more software tools in Hadnagy; while Conheady doesn't reference software tools until nearly half-way through the book.



This book provides an extensive introduction to the topic and details how social engineering has evolved through the centuries. Conheady writes how the overall tactics and goals have stayed the same; while the tools and techniques have been modified to suit the times.



The following are the chapters in the book:



1. Social Engineerings Evolution

2. The Ethical and Legal Aspects of Social Engineering

3. Practical Social Engineering and Why it Works

4. Planning Your Social Engineering Test

5. Reconnaissance & Information Gathering

6. Scenario Creation & Testing

7. Executing Your Social Engineering Test

8. Reporting

9. The Social Engineering Arsenal & Tools of the Trade

10. Defense Against Social Engineering Attacks

11. Tomorrows Social Engineering Attacks



Coming in at about 250 pages, the book finds a good balance between high-level details and actionable tactical things to execute on. Without getting bogged down in filler.



Since the social engineering tools and techniques only get better, the advantage Conheady's book has it that it details a lot that has changed in the 4 years since Hadnagy's book came out.



In chapter 1, she writes about mumble attacks, which are telephone-based social engineering attacks that are targeted at call center agents. The social engineer will pose as a speech-impaired customer or as a person calling on behalf of the speech-impaired customer. The goal of this method is to make the victims; in this case call center agents feel awkward or embarrassed and release the desired information. Given the pressure in which most call center agents are under; this is a simple yet highly effective attack.



Like Hadnagy, this also has a detailed social engineering test methodology. Conheady details a methodology with 5 stages: planning and target identification, research and reconnaissance, scenario creation, attack execution and exit, and reporting. She notes that one does not have to be a slave to the methodology, and it can be modified depending on the project.



Social engineering can often operate on the limit of what is legal and ethical. The author goes to great lengths to write what the ethical and legal obligations are for the tester.



The book is filled with lots of practical advice as Conheady is seasoned and experienced in the topic. From advice to dealing with bathrooms as a holding location, gaining laptop connectivity and more; she writes of the many small details that can make the difference between a successful social engineering test and a failed one.



The book also details many areas where the job of the social engineer is made easy based on poor security practices at the location. Chapter 7 details how many locations have access codes on doors often don't do much to keep social engineers out. Many doors have 4-character codes, and she writes that she has seen keypads where the combination numbers have been so worn down that you can spot them straightaway.



As noted earlier, the book focuses more on the human techniques of social engineering than on software tools. She does not ignore that tools and in chapter 9 provides a list of some of the more popular tools to use, including Maltego, Cree.py and others. She also has lists of other tools to use such as recording devices, bugging devices, phone tools and more.



With all those, she still notes that the cell phone is the single most useful item you can bring with you on a social engineering test. She writes that some of the many uses a cell phone has is to discourage challengers, fake a call to look busy, use the camera and more.



While most of the book is about how to execute a social engineering test, chapter 10 details how you can defend against social engineering. She notes that it is notoriously difficult to defend against social engineering because it targets the weakest link in the security chain: the end-user. She astutely notes that a firm can't simply roll out a patch and immunize its staff against the latest social engineering attack. Even though there are vendors who make it seem like you can.



The chapter also lists a number of indicators that a firm may be experiencing a social engineering attack.



Hadnagy's book is still the gold-standard on the topic. But Social Engineering in IT Security Tools, Tactics, and Techniquescertainly will give it a run for the money.



Hadnagy's approach to social engineering is quite broad and aggressive. Conheady takes more of a kinder, gentler approach to the topic.



For those that are looking for an effective guide on which to build their social engineering testing program on, this certainly provides all of the core areas and nearly everything they need to know about the fundamentals of the topic.







Reviewed by Ben Rothke"

Clearpath's public stance on Killer Robots a first in corporate responsibility

Hallie Siegel (2948665) writes | 4 hours ago

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Hallie Siegel (2948665) writes "Last week the Waterloo-based Clearpath publicly pledged not to develop lethal autonomous weapons in support of the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots. While the Campaign has garnered significant support since its launch, it has not previously had support from the for-profit robotics sector — making Clearpath's public statement a noteworthy demonstration of corporate responsibility, particularly given the company's background in military applications."
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New research suggests cancer may be an intrinsic property of cells

cranky_chemist (1592441) writes | 4 hours ago

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cranky_chemist (1592441) writes ""Cancer simply may be here to stay. Researchers at Kiel University, the Catholic University of Croatia and other institutions discovered that hydra — tiny, coral-like polyps that emerged hundreds of millions of years ago — form tumors similar to those found in humans. Which suggests that our cells' ability to develop cancer is 'an intrinsic property' that has evolved at least since then — way, way, way before we rallied our forces to try to tackle it, said Thomas Bosch, an evolutionary biologist at Kiel University who led the study, published in Nature Communications in June."

The paywalled original article is available at http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2..."

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FCC warned not to take actions a Republican-led FCC would dislike

tlhIngan (30335) writes | 5 hours ago

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tlhIngan (30335) writes "Municipal broadband is in the news again — this time Chief of Staff Matthew Berry, speaking at the National Conference of State Legislatures, has endorsed states' right to ban municipal broadband networks and warned the (Democrat-led) FCC to not do anything that a future Republican led FCC would dislike. The argument is that municipal broadband discourages private investment in broadband communications, that taxpayer-funded projects are barriers to future infrastructure investment."
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NASA's Space Launch System searches for a mission

schwit1 (797399) writes | 5 hours ago

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schwit1 (797399) writes "Managers of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) are searching for a mission that they can propose and convince Congress to fund.

Any honest read of this article will conclude that this very expensive rocket system is an absurd waste of money. It has no mission now, and will never get one considering the cost. Instead, NASA will spend billions to fly two test flights, both unmanned, and then the money will run out."

Future hack: New cybersecurity tool predicts breaches before they happen

Anonymous Coward writes | 5 hours ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "A new research paper outlines new software that scans and scrapes web sites from today and the past, learns patters about what happens prior to a security breach, and then accurately predicts what websites will be hacked in the future. The new tool is up to 66% accuracy.

The classifier is focused on Web server malware or, put more simply, the hacking and hijacking of a website that is then used to attack all its visitors.

If it is possible to accurately predict which sites and servers are most at-risk, it becomes easier to keep an eye on and warn against dangerous websites, the researchers say. Website operators can be alerted ahead of an attack, and search engines can easily know which websites to keep an eye on for potential exclusion from search results.

The algorithm is designed to automatically detect whether a Web server is likely to become malicious in the future by analyzing a wide array of the site’s characteristics: For example, what software does the server run? What keywords are present? How are the Web pages structured? If your website has a whole lot in common with another website that ended up hacked, the classifier will predict a gloomy future.

The classifier itself always updates and evolves, the researchers wrote. It can “quickly adapt to emerging threats.”

"
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Would Scottish independence mean the end of UK's nuclear arsenal?

Lasrick (2629253) writes | 5 hours ago

0

Lasrick (2629253) writes "The referendum on Scottish independence on September 18th affects more than just residents of the United Kingdom. All of the UK's nuclear deterrent is located in Scotland (no wonder they want independence), and Alex Salmond and the Scottish government have pledged to safely remove and permanently ban nuclear weapons from Scottish territory within the first term of a newly independent parliament. Although the polls seem not to favor Scottish independence, you would think the British government would have some sort of contingency plan to quickly and safely remove these weapons from Scottish soil. Nope. There's no contingency plan."
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Police warn sharing James Foley killing video is a crime

Anonymous Coward writes | 6 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Scotland Yard has warned internet users they could be arrested under terrorism legislation if they viewed or shared the video of James Foley's murder, as Twitter and YouTube attempted to remove all trace of the footage from the web.

Twitter suspended dozens of accounts that published the graphic footage while YouTube tried to remove several copies of the video, which was first uploaded on Tuesday night.

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo tweeted: "We have been and are actively suspending accounts as we discover them related to this graphic imagery. Thank you."

The unprecedented social media clampdown came as the Metropolitan police warned that even viewing the video could constitute a criminal offence in the UK.

The force said in a statement: "The MPS counter-terrorism command (SO15) is investigating the contents of the video that was posted online in relation to the alleged murder of James Foley. We would like to remind the public that viewing, downloading or disseminating extremist material within the UK may constitute an offence under terrorism legislation.""

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What You Wish You'd Known Starting Out As A Programmer

snydeq (1272828) writes | 6 hours ago

2

snydeq (1272828) writes "Most of us gave little thought to the 'career' aspect of programming when starting out, but here we are, battle-hardened by hard-learned lessons, slouching our way through decades at the console, wishing perhaps that we had recognized the long road ahead when we started. What advice might we give to our younger self, or to younger selves coming to programming just now? Andrew C. Oliver offers eight insights he gave little thought to when first coding: 'As the old Faces song "Ooh La La" goes, I wish that I knew what I know now when I was younger. Back then, I simply loved to code and could have cared less about my "career" or about playing well with others. I could have saved myself a ton of trouble if I'd just followed a few simple practices.' What are yours?"

Scientists Confirm Life Under Antarctic Ice for the First Time

MikeChino (1640221) writes | 6 hours ago

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MikeChino (1640221) writes "A new paper by a group of researchers from Montana State University confirms that life can survive under antarctic ice. Researchers led by John Priscu drilled down into the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and pulled up organisms called Archaea. These organisms survive by converting methane into energy, enabling them to survive where there is no wind or sunlight, buried deep under the ice."
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How Game Developers Turn Kickstarter Failure Into Success

Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes | 7 hours ago

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Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "When you ask random strangers on the Internet to give you money, there are no guarantees. That’s true in almost any scenario, including when video game developers use Kickstarter to crowdfund the creation of a game. While 3,900 or so games have been funded on Kickstarter, more than 7,200 game projects failed to hit their goal. Within those two numbers are some people who fall into both categories: developers who failed to get funding on their first try, but re-launched campaigns and hit their goals. Jon Brodkin spoke with a handful of those indie game developers who succeeded on their second try; many of them used the momentum (and fans) from the first attempt to get a head start on funding the second, and one even adjusted his entire plan based on community feedback. But succeeding the second time also depended on quite a bit of luck."
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