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Raspberry Pi Hardware in Smartwatch Form Factor

Anonymous Coward writes | 7 minutes ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "The folks over at Hardkernel have developed the Odroid-W, a miniature computing module which is fully compatible with all software available for the Raspberry-Pi. It can be combined with a li-poly battery and 2.2" screen to make a smart watch format device."
Link to Original Source

The Societal Effects of Shared Custody Arrangements

rhyder128k (1051042) writes | 14 minutes ago

0

rhyder128k (1051042) writes "Giving men and women equal rights of custody would have benefits for most of society macroeconomically and socially, but no one seems to be talking about it. I've outlined some of the possible changes to society as a whole.

From the article:

"When we're talking about making changes to custody arrangements, we are talking about making changes to the family itself, the fundamental unit of a society. This terrifies some people, and yet it needn't. Urbanisation, information technology, sexual revolution, the effects of 24/7 media: social change was the dominant theme of the 20th century. Single parent families were once a rarity, but currently, 1.8 million households would be classified as such. What the family is can't be frozen, any more than it can be reverted it to what it was 60 years ago. It has already changed, and it will continue to change.

One of the most common mistakes people make when considering gender politics issues is to ignores the reality of a zero-sum game. In other words, it's impossible to impact the lives of one gender without affecting the other gender as well. If shared parenting became the default judgement it would mean that childcare responsibilities, for many women, would drop to only three and a half days a week. Similarly, many men would experience an improvement in their ability to sustain meaningful relationships with their children and to achieve a more substantial family life. It would also bring about other less obvious benefits for men and women that we'll come to in a moment.""

Link to Original Source

Comcast Confessions

Anonymous Coward writes | 12 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "We heard a couple weeks ago about an incredibly pushy Comcast customer service representative who turned a quick cancellation into an ordeal you wouldn't wish on your enemies. To try and find out what could cause such behavior, The Verge reached out to Comcast employees, hoping a few of them would explain training practices and management directives. They got more than they bargained for — over 100 employees responded, and they paint a picture of a corporation overrun by the neverending quest for greater profit. From the article: 'These employees told us the same stories over and over again: customer service has been replaced by an obsession with sales, technicians are understaffed and tech support is poorly trained, and the massive company is hobbled by internal fragmentation. ... Brian Van Horn, a billing specialist who worked at Comcast for 10 years, says the sales pitch gradually got more aggressive. "They were starting off with, ‘just ask," he says. "Then instead of ‘just ask,’ it was ‘just ask again,’ then ‘engage the customer in a conversation,’ then ‘overcome their objections.’" He was even pressured to pitch new services to a customer who was 55 days late on her bill, he says.'"
Link to Original Source

375 Million Customer Records Compromised In 2014

Anonymous Coward writes | about an hour ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Between April and June of this year, there were a total of 237 breaches that compromised more than 175 million customer records of personal and financial information worldwide. For the first half of 2014, more than 375 million customer records were stolen or lost as a result of 559 breaches worldwide. The retail industry had more data records compromised than any other industry during the second quarter, with 83 percent of all data records breached."

UK to allow driverless cars by 2015

rtoz (2530056) writes | 1 hour ago

0

rtoz (2530056) writes "The UK government has announced that driverless cars will be allowed on public roads from January next year.

It also invited cities to compete to host one of three trials of the tech, which would start at the same time.

In addition, ministers ordered a review of the UK's road regulations to provide appropriate guidelines.

The debate now is whether to allow cars, like the prototype unveiled by Google in May, to abandon controls including a steering wheel and pedals and rely on the vehicle's computer.

Or whether, instead, to allow the machine to drive, but insist a passenger be ready to wrest back control at a moment's notice."

Reglue: Opening Up the World to Deserving Kids with Linux Computers

jrepin (667425) writes | yesterday

0

jrepin (667425) writes "Today, a child without access to a computer (and the Internet) at home is at a disadvantage before he or she ever sets foot in a classroom. The unfortunate reality is that in an age where computer skills are no longer optional, far too many families don't possess the resources to have a computer at home. Linux Journal recently had the opportunity to talk with Ken Starks about his organization, Reglue (Recycled Electronics and Gnu/Linux Used for Education) and its efforts to bridge this digital divide."
Link to Original Source

Observation of a quantum Cheshire Cat in a matter-wave interferometer experiment

Dupple (1016592) writes | 3 hours ago

0

Dupple (1016592) writes "From its very beginning, quantum theory has been revealing extraordinary and counter-intuitive phenomena, such as wave-particle duality, Schrödinger cats and quantum non-locality. Another paradoxical phenomenon found within the framework of quantum mechanics is the ‘quantum Cheshire Cat’: if a quantum system is subject to a certain pre- and postselection, it can behave as if a particle and its property are spatially separated. It has been suggested to employ weak measurements in order to explore the Cheshire Cat’s nature. Here we report an experiment in which we send neutrons through a perfect silicon crystal interferometer and perform weak measurements to probe the location of the particle and its magnetic moment."
Link to Original Source

"I accidentally started a Wikipedia hoax"

Andreas Kolbe (2591067) writes | 4 hours ago

2

Andreas Kolbe (2591067) writes "The Daily Dot's EJ Dickson reports how she accidentally discovered that a hoax factoid she added over five years ago as a stoned sophomore to the Wikipedia article on “Amelia Bedelia, the protagonist of the eponymous children’s book series about a ‘literal-minded housekeeper’ who misunderstands her employer’s orders”, had not just remained on Wikipedia all this time, but come to be cited by a Taiwanese English professor, in “innumerable blog posts and book reports”, as well as a book on Jews and Jesus. It's a cautionary tale about the fundamental unreliability of Wikipedia. And as Wikipedia ages, more and more such stories are coming to light."

Airbnb Partners With Cities For Disaster Preparedness

Anonymous Coward writes | yesterday

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An anonymous reader writes "Every time a city- or state-wide disaster strikes, services to help the victims slowly crop up over the following days and weeks. Sometimes they work well, sometimes they don't. Today, city officials in San Francisco and Portland announced a partnership with peer-to-peer lodging service Airbnb to work out some disaster-preparedness plans ahead of time. Airbnb will locate hosts in these cities who will commit to providing a place to stay for people who are displaced in a disaster, and then set up alerts and notifications to help people find these hosts during a crisis. The idea is that if, say, an earthquake or wildfires for thousands of people to evacuate their homes, they can easily be absorbed into an organized group of willing hosts, rather than being shunted to one area and forced to live in a school gymnasium or similar."
Link to Original Source

The Terrifying Truth About How The Drugs You Take Get Tested

gallifreyan99 (3502381) writes | 7 hours ago

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gallifreyan99 (3502381) writes "Every drug you take will have been tested on people before it—but that testing process is meant to be tightly controlled, for the safety of everyone involved. Two chilling investigations document the horrifying extent—and that lack of oversight the FDA seems to have over the process. First, drugs are increasingly being tested on homeless, destitute and mentally ill people. Second, it turns out many human trials are being run by doctors who have had their licenses revoked for drug addiction, malpractice and worse."
Link to Original Source

Jackson: Tech Diversity is Next Civil Rights Step

theodp (442580) writes | 8 hours ago

0

theodp (442580) writes "Having seen this movie before, U.S. civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson called on the Obama administration Monday to scrutinize the tech industry's lack of diversity. "There's no talent shortage. There's an opportunity shortage," Jackson said, calling Silicon Valley "far worse" than many others, such as car makers that have been pressured by unions. He said tech behemoths have largely escaped scrutiny by a public dazzled with their cutting-edge gadgets. Jackson spoke after meeting with Labor Secretary Tom Perez to press for a review of H-1B visas, arguing that data show Americans have the skills and should have first access to high-paying tech work. Jackson's Rainbow Push Coalition plans to file a freedom-of-information request next month with the EEOC to acquire employment data for companies that have not yet disclosed it publicly, which includes Amazon, Broadcom, Oracle, Qualcomm and Yelp. Unlike the DOL, Jackson isn't buying Silicon Valley's argument that minority hiring statistics are trade secrets. Five years after Google's HR Chief would only reassure Congress the company had "a very strong internal Black Googler Network" and its CEO brushed off similar questions about its diversity numbers by saying "we're pretty happy with the way our recruiting work," Google — under pressure from Jackson — fessed up to having a tech workforce that's only 1% Black, apparently par for the course in Silicon Valley."

Is running mission-critical servers without a firewall a "thing"?

Anonymous Coward writes | 9 hours ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "I do some contract work on the side (as many folks do), and am helping a client set up a new point of sale system. For the time being, it's pretty simple: selling products, keeping track of employee time, managing inventory and the like. However, it requires a small network because there are two clients, and one of the clients feeds off of a small SQL Express database from the first. During the setup the vendor disabled the local firewall, and in a number of emails back and forth since (with me getting more and more aggravated) they went from suggesting that there's no NEED for a firewall, to outright telling me that's just how they do it and the contract dictates that's how we need to run it. This isn't a tremendous deal today, but with how things are going odds are there will be e-Commerce worked into it, and probably credit card transactions.. which worries the bejesus out of me.

So my question to the Slashdot masses: is this common? In my admittedly limited networking experience, it's been drilled into my head fairly well that not running a firewall is lazy (if not simply negligent), and to open the appropriate ports and call it a day. However, I've seen forum posts here and there with people admitting they run their clients without firewalls, believing that the firewall on their incoming internet connection is good enough, and that their client security will pick up the pieces. I'm curious how many real professionals do this, or if the forum posts I'm seeing (along with the vendor in question) are just a bunch of clowns."

Ford, GM Sued Over Vehicles' CD-R Ability To Rip Music To Hard Drive

Lucas123 (935744) writes | 10 hours ago

0

Lucas123 (935744) writes "The Alliance of Artists and Recording Companies is suing Ford and General Motors for millions of dollars over alleged copyrights infringement violations because their vehicles' CD-Rs can rip music to infotainment center hard drives. The AARC claims in its filing that the CD-R's ability to copy music violates the Audio Home Recording Act of 1992. The Act protects against distributing digital audio recording devices whose primary purpose is to rip copyrighted material. For example, Ford's owner's manual explains, "Your mobile media navigation system has a Jukebox which allows you to save desired tracks or CDs to the hard drive for later access. The hard drive can store up to 10GB (164 hours; approximately 2,472 tracks) of music." The AARC wants $2,500 for each digital audio recording device installed in a vehicle, the amount it says should have been paid in royalties."
Link to Original Source

University of Michigan solar car wins fifth straight national title

Anonymous Coward writes | yesterday

0

An anonymous reader writes "For the fifth consecutive year, the solar car team from the University of Michigan has won the American Solar Car Challenge. The event is an eight-day, 1,700-mile race with a total of 23 participating teams. The Umich victory comes in spite of a 20-30 minute delay when they had problems with the motor at the very beginning of the race. "They made the time up when team strategists decided to push the car to the speed limit while the sun was shining bright, rather than hold back to conserve energy." Footage of the race and daily updates on the car's performance are available from the team's website, as are the specs of the car itself. Notably, the current iteration of the car weighs only 320 pounds, a full 200 pounds lighter than the previous version."
Link to Original Source

Old Apache Code at Root of Android FakeID Mess

chicksdaddy (814965) writes | yesterday

0

chicksdaddy (814965) writes "The Security Ledger reports that a four year-old vulnerability in an open source component that is a critical part of Android mobile OS leaves hundreds of millions of mobile devices susceptible silent malware infections. (https://securityledger.com/2014/07/old-apache-code-at-root-of-android-fakeid-mess/)

The vulnerability was disclosed on Tuesday (http://bluebox.com/news/). It affects devices running Android versions 2.1 to 4.4 (“KitKat”), according to a statement released by Bluebox. According to Bluebox, the vulnerability was found in a package installer in affected versions of Android. The installer doesn't attempt to determine the authenticity of certificate chains that are used to vouch for new digital identity certificates. In short, Bluebox writes “an identity can claim to be issued by another identity, and the Android cryptographic code will not verify the claim.”

The security implications of this are vast. Malicious actors could create a malicious mobile application with a digital identity certificate that claims to be issued by Adobe Systems. Once installed, vulnerable versions of Android will treat the application as if it was actually signed by Adobe and give it access to local resources, like the special webview plugin privilege, that can be used to sidestep security controls and virtual ‘sandbox’ environments that keep malicious programs from accessing sensitive data and other applications running on the Android device.

In a scenario that is becoming all too common: the flaw appears to have been introduced to Android through an open source component — this time from Apache Harmony (http://harmony.apache.org/), an open source alternative to Oracle’s Java. Google turned to Harmony as an alternative means of supporting Java in the absence of a deal with Oracle to license Java directly.

Work on Harmony was discontinued in November, 2011. However, Google has continued using native Android libraries that are based on Harmony code. The vulnerability concerning certificate validation in the package installer module persisted even as the two codebases diverged."

Link to Original Source

Chinese government probes Microsoft over anti-monopoly issues

DroidJason1 (3589319) writes | 13 hours ago

0

DroidJason1 (3589319) writes "The Chinese government is investigating Microsoft for possible breaches of anti-monopoly laws, following a series of surprise visits to Redmond's offices in cities across China on Monday. These surprise visits were part of China's ongoing investigation, and were based on security complaints about Microsoft’s Windows operating system and Office productivity suite. Results from an earlier inspection apparently were not enough to clear Microsoft of suspicion of anti-competitive behavior. Microsoft's alleged anti-monopoly behavior is a criminal matter, so if found guilty, the software giant could face steep fines as well as other sanctions."

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