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Elusive Form of Evolution Seen in Spiders

Anonymous Coward writes | 1 minute ago

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An anonymous reader writes "a new study of Anelosimus studiosus, a species of tangle-web spiders, published this week in Nature, suggests that evolution does indeed work at the level of the group. If certain groups of animals are more productive than others — that is, if they produce more progeny — then evolution will tend to favor the traits that make such fecundity possible. According to Pruitt, the findings are the first to provide direct evidence that natural selection can drive the evolution of a group trait in the wild."
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Doctor Boards Atlanta Flight In HazMat Suit To Protest "Lying CDC"

schwit1 (797399) writes | 8 minutes ago

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schwit1 (797399) writes ""If they're not lying, they are grossly incompetent," said Dr. Gil Mobley, a microbiologist and emergency trauma physician from Springfield, Mo. as he checked in and cleared Atlanta airport security wearing a mask, goggles, gloves, boots and a hooded white jumpsuit emblazoned on the back with the words, "CDC is lying!" As The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports, Mobley says the CDC is "sugar-coating" the risk of the virus spreading in the United States."
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My website

Anonymous Coward writes | 11 minutes ago

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An anonymous reader writes "My name is Lola and I am a website owner, a blogger and I have a few part time jobs as well. All this keeps me very busy, I tend to spend a lot of my time either working or online. I love it but sometimes I really feel I need to stop and just go for a walk or something! One day I dream of having enough money to give up one or even both of my part time jobs so I can have a bit more relaxation time. Still we can always have everything we want, but I do very much believe that with hard work we can get a good life for ourselves. Ok I will stop this as it feels a bit like I am starting to ramble on too much lol!"
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US offers $60 million for radical new energy technology

coondoggie (973519) writes | about half an hour ago

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coondoggie (973519) writes "Far-reaching changes in the way we cool large structures and make alternative energy products are driving $60 million worth of research and product development from the Department of Energy.

Specifically, the DOE’s advanced research group Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) this week announced two programs, one that would focus on developing low-cost, highly efficient and scalable dry-cooling technologies for thermoelectric power plants and another to advance automated systems-level technology that would speed improvement of plant biomass crops to increase alternative fuel options."

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The DoD Plods Toward 21st Century Databases And Software

genbcap (3863133) writes | 49 minutes ago

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genbcap (3863133) writes "The Department of Defense's slow, steady migration to public and private cloud architectures may be hastened by pressures at opposite ends of the spectrum. At one end are programs such as the NSA's cloud-based distributed RDBMS that realize huge cost savings and other benefits. At the other end are the growing number of sophisticated attacks (and resulting breaches) on expensive-to-maintain legacy systems. The consensus is that the DOD's adoption of public and private cloud infrastructures is inevitable, which makes the outlook rosy for commercial cloud services of all types."
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World's first free online computer coding course made by youth for youth

Anonymous Coward writes | 1 hour ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Junior-high girls, with support of University of Alberta’s Faculty of Engineering, create 'Intro to coding' MOOC. Targeted at girls but open to anyone, anywhere. The unique form of peer mentorship offered by this course is hoped to help encourage and foster a an interest in coding to change the future of a demographic underrepresented in STEM industries."
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Teens Take On Drone Collision Avoidance, Cyber Bullying, and More at Google Scie

Tekla Perry (3034735) writes | 1 hour ago

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Tekla Perry (3034735) writes "Coding? It's not that hard, say the teen finalists who entered engineering projects into the Google Science Fair. And they sure make it look simple. A fourteen-year old left a banana on a counter and returned to find the house full of fruit flies that were surprisingly hard to swat. That was pretty cool, he thought, and built a fruit-fly vision system into a drone, then programmed the drone to use fruit-fly behaviors to dodge moving objects. Another fourteen-year-old read a newspaper story about cyberbullying and set out to figure out to inhibit such behavior with an app. A sixteen-year-old was curious about sleep apnea when he separately learned about the musical instrument the Theremin, and built a system that applies Theremin technology to the sleep apnea problem. And more."
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Experiment Shows Stylized Rendering Enhances Presence in Immersive AR

Anonymous Coward writes | 1 hour ago

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An anonymous reader writes "William Steptoe, a senior researcher in the Virtual Environments and Computer Graphics group at University College London, published a paper detailing experiments dealing with the seamless integration of virtual objects into a real scene. Participants were tested to see if they could correctly identify which objects in the scene were real or virtual. With standard rendering, participants were able to correctly guess 73% of the time. Once a stylized rendering outline was applied, accuracy dropped to 56% (around change) and even further to 38% as the stylized rendering was increased. Less accuracy means users were less able to tell the difference between real and virtual objects. Steptoe says that this blurring of real and virtual can increase 'presence', the feeling of being truly present in another space, in immersive augmented reality applications."
Link to Original Source

Lost Opportunity? Windows 10 Has The Same Minimum PC Requirements As Vista

MojoKid (1002251) writes | 1 hour ago

1

MojoKid (1002251) writes "Buried in the details of Microsoft's technical preview for Windows 10 is a bit of a footnote concerning the operating system's requirements. Windows 10 will have exactly the same requirements as Windows 8.1, which had the same requirements as Windows 8, which stuck to Windows 7 specs, which was the same as Windows Vista. At this point, it's something we take for granted with future Windows release. As the years roll by, you can't help wondering what we're actually giving up in exchange for holding the minimum system spec at a single-core 1GHz, 32-bit chip with just 1GB of RAM. The average smartphone is more powerful than this these days. For decades, the standard argument has been that Microsoft had to continue supporting ancient operating systems and old configurations, ignoring the fact that the company did its most cutting-edge work when it was willing to kill off its previous products in fairly short order. what would Windows look like if Microsoft at least mandated a dual-core product? What if DX10 — a feature set that virtually every video card today supports, according to Valve's Steam Hardware Survey, became the minimum standard, at least on the x86 side of the equation? How much better might the final product be if Microsoft put less effort into validating ancient hardware and kicked those specs upwards, just a notch or two?"
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MIT Thinks It Has Discovered the 'Perfect' Solar Cell

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes | 2 hours ago

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Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "A new MIT study offers a way out of one of solar power's most vexing problems: the matter of efficiency, and the bare fact that much of the available sunlight in solar power schemes is wasted. The researchers appear to have found the key to perfect solar energy conversion efficiency—or at least something approaching it. It's a new material that can accept light from an very large number of angles and can withstand the very high temperatures needed for a maximally efficient scheme.

Conventional solar cells, the silicon-based sheets used in most consumer-level applications, are far from perfect. Light from the sun arrives here on Earth's surface in a wide variety of forms. These forms—wavelengths, properly—include the visible light that makes up our everyday reality, but also significant chunks of invisible (to us) ultraviolet and infrared light. The current standard for solar cells targets mostly just a set range of visible light."

Link to Original Source

Building a Honeypot to Observe Shellshock Attacks in the Real World

Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes | 2 hours ago

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Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "A look at some of the Shellshock-related reports from the past week makes it seem as if attackers are flooding networks with cyberattacks targeting the vulnerability in Bash that was disclosed last week. While the attackers haven’t wholesale adopted the flaw, there have been quite a few attacks—but the reality is that attackers are treating the flaw as just one of many methods available in their tool kits. One way to get a front-row seat of what the attacks look like is to set up a honeypot. Luckily, threat intelligence firm ThreatStream released ShockPot, a version of its honeypot software with a specific flag, “is_shellshock,” that captures attempts to trigger the Bash vulnerability. Setting up ShockPot on a Linux server from cloud host Linode.com is a snap. Since attackers are systematically scanning all available addresses in the IPv4 space, it’s just a matter of time before someone finds a particular ShockPot machine. And that was definitely the case, as a honeypot set up by a Dice (yes, yes, we know) tech writer captured a total of seven Shellshock attack attempts out of 123 total attacks. On one hand, that’s a lot for a machine no one knows anything about; on the other, it indicates that attackers haven’t wholesale dumped other methods in favor of going after this particular bug. PHP was the most common attack method observed on this honeypot, with various attempts to trigger vulnerabilities in popular PHP applications and to execute malicious PHP scripts."
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Intel drops sponsorship of Gamasutra in response to feminist articles

Anonymous Coward writes | 2 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Processor firm Intel has withdrawn its advertising from Gamasutra in response to the site's decision to carry feminist articles. The articles had drawn the ire of the self-described "Gater" movement, a grass-roots campaign to discredit prominent female games journalists. Intel was apparently so inundated with criticism for sponsoring the Gamasutra site that it had no choice but to withdraw support. An Intel spokesperson explained that "We take feedback from our customers very seriously especially as it relates to contextually relevant content and placements" and as such Gamasutra was no longer an appropriate venue for their products."

Hacking USB firmware

Anonymous Coward writes | 2 hours ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Now the NSA isn't the only one who can hack your USB firmware:

In a talk at the Derbycon hacker conference in Louisville, Kentucky last week, researchers Adam Caudill and Brandon Wilson showed that they’ve reverse engineered the same USB firmware as Nohl’s SR Labs, reproducing some of Nohl’s BadUSB tricks. And unlike Nohl, the hacker pair has also published the code for those attacks on Github, raising the stakes for USB makers to either fix the problem or leave hundreds of millions of users vulnerable.

Personally, I always thought it was insane that USB drives don't come with physical write-protect switches to keep them from being infected by malware."

How Solar Power Could Become the World's Dominant Energy Source in 35 Years

Lasrick (2629253) writes | 2 hours ago

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Lasrick (2629253) writes "Brian Merchant looks at the latest International Energy Agency's latest report which projects that solar power could overtake fossil fuels as the dominant source of energy within 35 years. 'The International Energy Agency lays out a roadmap for how photovoltaic panels—the kind on your neighbor's roof—could provide 16 percent of the world's electricity by 2050. Meanwhile, concentrated solar power plants, larger projects designed to reflect large amounts of sunlight onto a single point to drive a heat engine, may generate up to 11 percent.'"
Link to Original Source

End of an era: After a 30 year run, IBM drops support for Lotus 1-2-3

klubar (591384) writes | 2 hours ago

0

klubar (591384) writes "Although it has been fading for years, the final death knell came recently for the iconic Lotus 1-2-3. In many ways, Lotus 1-2-3 launched the PC era (and ensured the Apple II success), and once was a serious competitor for Excel (and prior to that Multiplan and VisiCalc). Although I doubt if anyone is creating new Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheets, I'm sure there are spreadsheets still being used who trace their origin to Lotus 1-2-3, and even Office 2013 still has some functions and key compatibility with Lotus 1-2-3. Oh, how far the mighty have fallen."
Link to Original Source

OpenStack at risk of patent trolls according to Linux protection watchdog

Anonymous Coward writes | 3 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "From the article: "The Open Invention Network (OIN), founded by major tech companies to protect Linux from spurious patent claims, warns that the OpenStack cloud computing platform is a prime target for a new round of pre-emptive litigation."

The chief executive of OIN warns of '“a potential situation for mischief and for people to start inventing ahead of where core technology is being invented...I have more than a little concern this could be a flash point or a battleground.”

Major technology firms are currently investing billions of dollars in new cloud-based offerings which have OpenStack at their core. Cisco acquired OpenStack specialist Metacloud in mid-September in order to boost its InterCloud offering, while HP has committed $1 billion in investment for its Helion project over the next two years, recently acquiring former nemesis Eucalyptus, a major OpenStack proponent.

The OIN was formed by Red Hat, IBM, Novell, Sony and Philips in 2005 during a series of patent litigations aimed at the Linux project, including Microsoft, which famously claimed that it owned 270 unnamed patents which Linux was infringing, and went on to demand licensing fees from Linux OEMs and software developers."

Link to Original Source

Why Microsoft skipped Windows 9

Bizzeh (851225) writes | 3 hours ago

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Bizzeh (851225) writes "Microsoft may not be everybody's favorite company, but they are the kings of backwards compatibility. When testing what was Windows 9 (and is now Windows 10). It seems like they came across some compatibility issues from the Windows 9x days. Mentioned by Mikko Hypponen on twitter (https://twitter.com/mikko/status/517358472715710465), quite a lot of products test the version string with "indexOf("windows 9")". Using searchcode, we can see what he means. https://searchcode.com/?q=if(v..."

Tesla's Unveiling The D And Something Else On Oct. 9

cartechboy (2660665) writes | 3 hours ago

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cartechboy (2660665) writes "Tesla CEO Elon Musk isn't a man to mince words. He speaks and the Internet, no, the world seems to listen. He captures attention in similar fashion as Steve Jobs. Last night he tweeted, "About time to unveil the D and something else". The image tweeted appeared to be the front end of a Model S and the letter D on garage door. So what is it? Probably an updated Model S. Those updates could range from available all-wheel drive and new active safety systems, to the rumored 110-kilowatt-hour pack. While all of these are logical predictions, no one truly knows what Tesla's planning to unveil on the 9th, yet. Anyone care to wager what Tesla has prepared?"

VR Dev Creates Incredible 'Holographic' UI Powered by Oculus and Leap Motion

Anonymous Coward writes | 3 hours ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Tomas “Frooxius” Mariancik is the mind behind SightLine, the 3rd place winner in Oculus VR's 2013 game jam (http://bit.ly/1mUWEgq). After expanding SightLine into one of the coolest virtual reality demos for the Oculus Rift DK2 (http://bit.ly/1pIv1ll), he's turned his sights toward virtual reality user interaction with the Leap Motion natural input controller. His latest prototype shows impressively intuitive and practical VR user interface concepts like selecting, navigating, scrolling, and manipulating."
Link to Original Source

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