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Buying switchblade knives and knife for your needs

ChuckDoyle (3438367) writes | 17 minutes ago

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ChuckDoyle (3438367) writes "Knife isn't just one simple thing that's used for cutting or chopping of fruits, veggies and pork in the kitchen. There are many variants of a knife, each of those having completely different usage. It's neither straightforward to demark the practicality of any of these variants, neither is it okay to go about tracing each and every activity caused by the usage of knives. Therefore, these knives are constrained with variety of state, native and federal laws in many places around the world."
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Single European Copyright Title on the Horizon

presroi (657709) writes | yesterday

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presroi (657709) writes "It has been 13 years after the last harmonization effort of copyright within the European Union and this period might soon be over. After the election of a new European Parliament in May this year, Jean-Claude Juncker has been nominated to become the new President of the European Commission. He has named a unified copyright his top priority, a statement repeated today at a hearing before the Greens/EFA group in the European parliament (transscript of the question by MEP Julia Reda and his answer in German, Video recording). These statements are coinciding with the upcoming release of a report by the General Directorate in charge of copyright, of which an advanced draft has been already leaked to the internet. The report analyzes four possible policy options, one of which is the introduction of a Single EU Copyright title."
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The Physics of Ninja Warrior's Warped Wall

StartsWithABang (3485481) writes | 1 hour ago

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StartsWithABang (3485481) writes "Even with a brief running start, how can you expect to run up a steeply-curved wall and grab the top when it's some fourteen feet off the ground? Yet, this is one of the obstacles you must overcome if you wish to achieve total victory, and it was recently accomplished by a woman who's all of 5'0" (152 cm). There's a technique to doing it right, and it's based 100% in the physics of the human body. A great, educational read for those of you who like exclamation points!"

Yahoo Leveraging Flickr to Increase Userbase

phmadore (1391487) writes | 3 hours ago

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phmadore (1391487) writes "Yahoo!, that dinosaur of search and AOL-era user interfaces which (relatively) recently acquired tumblr and has owned the once-innovative image sharing site Flickr since 2005, sent me an e-mail today reminding me of a previous e-mail which I had not read in which they state that they are going to disable the ability to login via Facebook or Google account in two weeks. The brief e-mail read:

Hi Flickr User,

In two weeks, Flickr will remove the option to sign in with a Facebook or Google account. Instead, you will need to sign in using a Yahoo account. To create your Yahoo account click "get started" below.

We want to make this transition as easy as possible. If you have any questions, please check out our Help Articles or come see us in the Help Forum. We appreciate your understanding during this transition. Thank you for being a part of the Flickr community!

Though the notice gives no justification for this move, the motivation is obvious enough — people love Gmail and Facebook but are largely ambiguous about Yahoo! which probably results in a weakened userbase in a situation where people are able to fully use their services without having an account. However, a cursory search of the Flickr blog on the topic does not yield obvious results.The move also increases the likelihood that users will then go on to make use of other Yahoo! "services."

I guess it's not enough to undermine open content licensing, now you're going to wall your garden.

What alternative to Flickr are you presently using and what alternatives do you think deserve more attention than this aging also-ran?"

Dedicated low power embedded dev system choice?

Anonymous Coward writes | yesterday

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An anonymous reader writes "I'm a Solaris user which is not well supported by the OSS toolchains. I'd like to have a dedicated Linux based dev system which has good support for ARM, MSP430 and other MCU lines and draws very little (5-10 watts max) power. The Beaglebone Black has been suggested. Is there a better choice? This would only be used for software development and testing for embedded systems."

Police Recording Confirms NYPD Flew At a Drone and Never Feared Crashing

Jason Koebler (3528235) writes | 5 hours ago

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Jason Koebler (3528235) writes "An air traffic control recording confirms that a New York Police Department helicopter flew at a drone hovering near the George Washington Bridge earlier this week—not the other way around. What's more, police had no idea what to charge the drone pilots with, and never appeared to fear a crash with the drone.
Two men were arrested Monday on felony reckless endangerment charges after the NYPD said the two flew their drone "very close" to a law enforcement chopper, causing the police helicopter to take evasive maneuvers. Air traffic control recordings suggest that only happened after the chopper pilot decided to chase the drone."

The Lovelace Test Is Better Than the Turing Test at Detecting AI

meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes | yesterday

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meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes "If the Turing Test can be fooled by common trickery, it’s time to consider we need a new standard. The Lovelace Test is designed to be more rigorous, testing for true machine cognition. It was named it after Ada Lovelace, often described as the world's first computer programmer.

An intelligent computer passes the Lovelace Test only if it originates a “program” that it was not engineered to produce. The new program—it could be an idea, a novel, a piece of music, anything—can’t be a hardware fluke. Now here’s the kicker: The machine's designers must not be able to explain how their original code led to this new program."

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India forged Google SSL certificates

NotInHere (3654617) writes | 7 hours ago

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NotInHere (3654617) writes "As Google writes on its Online Security Blog, the National Informatics Centre of India (NIC) used its intermediate CA certificate issued by Indian CCA, to issue several unauthorized certificates for Google domains, allowing to do Man in the middle attacks. Possible impact however is limited, as, according to Google, the root certificates for the CA were only installed on Windows, which Firefox doesn't use, and for the Chrom{e,ium} browser, the CA for important Google domains is pinned to the Google CA.
According to its website, the NIC CA has suspended certificate issuance, and according to Google, its root certificates were revoked by Indian CCA."

The Future Of Wearables: Standalone, Unobtrusive, Everywhere

jfruh (300774) writes | yesterday

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jfruh (300774) writes "Wearable tech has been a pretty niche product so far, and a widely derided one at that, but moves are in the works to help the category break into the mainstream. One of the biggest irritants is that most wearable devices must pair with a smartphone to actually connect to the Internet — but an AT&T exec says that his company will be selling a standalone wearable by the end of 2014. Google Glass has been a flashpoint of conflict not least because it's extremely obvious; its creator says that subtle, non intrusive versions are coming. And while everyone wonders what Apple's play in this space will be, it may be best to imagine what they're working on as a successor to their fading iPod line."
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Solved: why the Moon's far side looks so different

StartsWithABang (3485481) writes | yesterday

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StartsWithABang (3485481) writes "55 years ago, the Soviet probe Luna 3 imaged the side of the Moon that faces away from us for the first time. Surprisingly, there were only two very small maria (dark regions) and large amounts of mountainous terrain, in stark contrast to the side that faces us. This remained a mystery for a very long time, even after we developed the giant impact hypothesis to explain the origin of the Moon. But a new study finally appears to solve the mystery, crediting the heat generated on the near side from a hot, young Earth with creating the differences between the two hemispheres."

Dubai's Climate-Controlled Dome City Is a Dystopia Waiting to Happen

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes | 12 hours ago

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Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "Dubai is building "the world's first climate-controlled city"—it's a 4.3 mile pedestrian mall that will be covered with a retractable dome to provide its shoppers with air conditioning in the summer heat. The Mall of the World, as it's called, will become the sort of spectacular, over-the-top attraction Dubai is known for. Shortly after, it will probably become an equally spectacular real-world dystopia.

By sectioning off a 3-million-square-foot portion of the city with an air conditioned dome, Dubai is dropping one of the most tangible partitions between the haves and the have nots of the modern era—the 100 hotels and apartment complexes inside the attraction will be cool, comfortable, and nestled into a entertainment-filled, if macabre, consumer paradise."

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The Video Game That Maps the Galaxy

Anonymous Coward writes | 10 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Video game designers and astronomers have been working different ends of the same problem: how to chart a galaxy full of stars. Astronomers start with observation, finding new and better ways to look into the sky and record what they can see. Game devs take the limited data we have as a starting point, and assume that everything else in the galaxy obeys roughly the same rules. They generate the rest of the galaxy procedurally from this data. But the information flow isn't simply one-way. As developers like David Braben improve their galaxy-creation models, astronomers can look at the models and see where they match (or not) with further observations, allowing them to improve their own scientific models in the process. "'The conflicts that show up are generally due to simplifications made in the models, for which new observations can provide improved guidelines. There’s a continuously evolving and developing understanding of space, in which both models and observations play important roles.' ... Elite’s model has expanded Braben’s understanding of planet formation and distribution. Braben boasts that his games predicted extra-solar planets ('These were pretty close to those that have been since discovered, demonstrating that there is some validity in our algorithms'), and that the game’s use of current planet-formation theories has shown the sheer number of different systems that can exist according to the rules, everything from nebulous gas giants to theoretically habitable worlds.""
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The Pentagon's $399 Billion Plane to Nowhere

schwit1 (797399) writes | yesterday

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schwit1 (797399) writes "On July 3 the the entire F-35 Joint Strike Fighter fleet was being grounded after a June 23 runway fire.

The grounding could not have come at a worse time as costs have soared to an estimated $112 million per aircraft.

One thing the grounding won't do, however, is derail the F-35, a juggernaut of a program that apparently has enough political top cover to withstand any storm.

Part of that protection comes from the jaw-dropping amounts of money at stake. The Pentagon intends to spend roughly $399 billion to develop and buy 2,443 of the planes. However, over the course of the aircrafts' lifetimes, operating costs are expected to exceed $1 trillion. Lockheed has carefully hired suppliers and subcontractors in almost every state to ensure that virtually all senators and members of Congress have a stake in keeping the program — and the jobs it has created — in place.

"An upfront question with any program now is: How many congressional districts is it in?" said Thomas Christie, a former senior Pentagon acquisitions official.

Counting all of its suppliers and subcontractors, parts of the program are spread out across at least 45 states. That's why there's no doubt lawmakers will continue to fund the program even though this is the third time in 17 months that the entire fleet has been grounded due to engine problems."

Link to Original Source

Cryptolocker lives on

Marius Buterchi (2848233) writes | 12 hours ago

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Marius Buterchi (2848233) writes "A major ransomware operation called Cryptolocker was supposedly halted by the FBI in May. Not so fast, security experts say. It's only a setback.

As antivirus maker Bitdefender points out, all that accomplished was to stop Cryptolocker's virus delivery system. Cryptolocker lives on, and its criminal masters just need to find a new botnet to start delivering viruses to new computers once again."

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