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Google's Social Menagerie and its Android and Web Habitats

Zigurd (3528) writes | 5 minutes ago

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Zigurd (3528) writes "In addition to search, email, and office productivity, Google runs at least nine "applications" that deal in user-provided content. We can't call them "Web sites" since most of them are presented through both Android applications and a Web user interface. But the extent and quality of this presentation is unequal and uneven. The content varies by media type and long form/short form characteristics. The intended persistence of the content also varies, though persistence often really means "ease of discovery" which can diminish quickly if a chronological update stream is the principal means of discovery."
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IBM to invest $3 Billion for Semiconductor Research

Taco Cowboy (5327) writes | 11 hours ago

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Taco Cowboy (5327) writes "A few decades ago the news of IBM investing billions in research did not even raise an eyelid, because that was what IBM did, and what IBM was good at

However, IBM has changed so much that nowadays when IBM wanting to invest $ 3 Billion in semiconductor research it hits the news headlines everywhere, from Bloomberg ( http://www.bloomberg.com/news/... ) to WSJ ( http://online.wsj.com/articles... ) to CNET ( http://www.cnet.com/news/ibm-s... )

Is what happening to IBM a reflection of what is happening to the American technological front ?"

Link to Original Source

Nearly 70% of critical infrastructure providers suffered a breach

Anonymous Coward writes | 1 hour ago

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An anonymous reader writes "New research from Unisys finds alarming gaps in the security of the world's critical infrastructure. Nearly 70 percent of companies responsible for the world's power, water and other critical functions have reported at least one security breach that led to the loss of confidential information or disruption of operations in the past 12 months. In a survey of 599 security executives at utility, oil and gas, energy and manufacturing companies, 64 percent of respondents anticipated one or more serious attacks in the coming year. Despite this risk, only 28 percent ranked security as one of the top five strategic priorities for their organization, while a majority named their top business priority as minimizing downtime."

Scientists Unveil Aircraft Technologies of The Future

stephendavion (2872091) writes | 2 hours ago

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stephendavion (2872091) writes "Scientists and engineers at BAE Systems have lifted the lid on some futuristic technologies that could be incorporated in military and civil aircraft of 2040 or even earlier.

The four technologies unveiled are: 3D printers so advanced they could print UAVs during a mission; aircraft parts that can heal themselves in minutes; a new type of long range aircraft which divides into a number of smaller aircraft when it reaches its destination, and a directed energy weapon that could engage missiles at the speed of light, destroy them and protect the people below.

"

UK government to rush in emergency surveillance laws

beaker_72 (1845996) writes | 2 hours ago

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beaker_72 (1845996) writes "The Guardian reports that the UK government has unveiled plans to introduce emergency surveillance laws into the UK parliament at the beginning of next week. These are aimed at reinforcing the powers of security services in the UK to force service providers to retain records of their customers phone calls and emails. The laws, which have been introduced after the European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruled that existing laws invaded individual privacy, will receive cross-party support and so will not be subjected to scrutiny or challenged in Parliament before entering the statute books. But as Tom Watson (Labour backbench MP and one of few dissenting voices) has pointed out, the ECJ ruling was six weeks ago, so why has the government waited until now to railroad something through. Unless of course they don't want it scrutinised too closely."
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Judge Shoots Down "Bitcoin Isn't Money" Argument in Silk Road Trial

Anonymous Coward writes | 9 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "The government and legal community may still be arguing over whether bitcoin can be defined as “money.” But the judge presiding over the landmark Silk Road drug case has declared that it’s at least close enough to get you locked up for money laundering. In a ruling released Wednesday, Judge Katherine Forrest denied a motion by Ross Ulbricht, the 30-year-old alleged creator of the Silk Road billion-dollar online drug bazaar, to dismiss all criminal charges against him. Those charges include narcotics trafficking conspiracy, money laundering, and hacking conspiracy charges, as well as a “continuing criminal enterprise” charge that’s better known as the “kingpin” statute used to prosecute criminal gang and cartel leaders."

4G 'inherently less secure' than 3G

sweetpea86 (2546266) writes | 3 hours ago

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sweetpea86 (2546266) writes "4G mobile networks are inherently less secure than 3G networks and other mobile protocols, security experts have warned. Before 4G, all voice and data traffic between the user’s device and the core of the network was encrypted and tightly-controlled by the mobile operator. Now, with 4G technology, encryption is only mandatory over the main Radio Access Network (RAN). The 'backhaul' portion of the network is unencrypted by default, leaving it potentially vulnerable to hackers. Some operators do encrypt the backhaul traffic on their networks, using a technology called IPsec, but many operators around the world, including some in Europe, have chosen to deploy 4G leaving the traffic between the core network and some or all of their cell sites vulnerable to attack."
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Single European Copyright Title on the Horizon

presroi (657709) writes | yesterday

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presroi (657709) writes "It has been 13 years after the last harmonization effort of copyright within the European Union and this period might soon be over. After the election of a new European Parliament in May this year, Jean-Claude Juncker has been nominated to become the new President of the European Commission. He has named a unified copyright his top priority, a statement repeated today at a hearing before the Greens/EFA group in the European parliament (transscript of the question by MEP Julia Reda and his answer in German, Video recording). These statements are coinciding with the upcoming release of a report by the General Directorate in charge of copyright, of which an advanced draft has been already leaked to the internet. The report analyzes four possible policy options, one of which is the introduction of a Single EU Copyright title."
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OpenWRT, Linux and WiFi made easy

Anonymous Coward writes | 5 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "DPTechnics, a belgian startup company who released a small OpenWRT module a few months ago, now has a new product. The DPT board is an affordable development board featuring 7 high power outputs, resistant 0-50V inputs and much more. They combine it with a full blown 400MHz processor, 64MiB RAM, USB2.0, dual ethernet, ...

Their goal is to make internet controlled stuff easy to make for everybody. Therefore they are designing a HTML5 graphical user interface to program the IO ports. Just log in to the module via WiFi, drag and drop in your workspace and click to play. No need to program events, servers, .... just click and save."

Link to Original Source

The Physics of Ninja Warrior's Warped Wall

StartsWithABang (3485481) writes | 6 hours ago

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StartsWithABang (3485481) writes "Even with a brief running start, how can you expect to run up a steeply-curved wall and grab the top when it's some fourteen feet off the ground? Yet, this is one of the obstacles you must overcome if you wish to achieve total victory, and it was recently accomplished by a woman who's all of 5'0" (152 cm). There's a technique to doing it right, and it's based 100% in the physics of the human body. A great, educational read for those of you who like exclamation points!"

Dedicated low power embedded dev system choice?

Anonymous Coward writes | yesterday

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An anonymous reader writes "I'm a Solaris user which is not well supported by the OSS toolchains. I'd like to have a dedicated Linux based dev system which has good support for ARM, MSP430 and other MCU lines and draws very little (5-10 watts max) power. The Beaglebone Black has been suggested. Is there a better choice? This would only be used for software development and testing for embedded systems."

Police Recording Confirms NYPD Flew At a Drone and Never Feared Crashing

Jason Koebler (3528235) writes | 9 hours ago

1

Jason Koebler (3528235) writes "An air traffic control recording confirms that a New York Police Department helicopter flew at a drone hovering near the George Washington Bridge earlier this week—not the other way around. What's more, police had no idea what to charge the drone pilots with, and never appeared to fear a crash with the drone.
Two men were arrested Monday on felony reckless endangerment charges after the NYPD said the two flew their drone "very close" to a law enforcement chopper, causing the police helicopter to take evasive maneuvers. Air traffic control recordings suggest that only happened after the chopper pilot decided to chase the drone."

The Lovelace Test Is Better Than the Turing Test at Detecting AI

meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes | yesterday

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meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes "If the Turing Test can be fooled by common trickery, it’s time to consider we need a new standard. The Lovelace Test is designed to be more rigorous, testing for true machine cognition. It was named it after Ada Lovelace, often described as the world's first computer programmer.

An intelligent computer passes the Lovelace Test only if it originates a “program” that it was not engineered to produce. The new program—it could be an idea, a novel, a piece of music, anything—can’t be a hardware fluke. Now here’s the kicker: The machine's designers must not be able to explain how their original code led to this new program."

Link to Original Source

India forged Google SSL certificates

NotInHere (3654617) writes | 12 hours ago

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NotInHere (3654617) writes "As Google writes on its Online Security Blog, the National Informatics Centre of India (NIC) used its intermediate CA certificate issued by Indian CCA, to issue several unauthorized certificates for Google domains, allowing to do Man in the middle attacks. Possible impact however is limited, as, according to Google, the root certificates for the CA were only installed on Windows, which Firefox doesn't use, and for the Chrom{e,ium} browser, the CA for important Google domains is pinned to the Google CA.
According to its website, the NIC CA has suspended certificate issuance, and according to Google, its root certificates were revoked by Indian CCA."

The Future Of Wearables: Standalone, Unobtrusive, Everywhere

jfruh (300774) writes | yesterday

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jfruh (300774) writes "Wearable tech has been a pretty niche product so far, and a widely derided one at that, but moves are in the works to help the category break into the mainstream. One of the biggest irritants is that most wearable devices must pair with a smartphone to actually connect to the Internet — but an AT&T exec says that his company will be selling a standalone wearable by the end of 2014. Google Glass has been a flashpoint of conflict not least because it's extremely obvious; its creator says that subtle, non intrusive versions are coming. And while everyone wonders what Apple's play in this space will be, it may be best to imagine what they're working on as a successor to their fading iPod line."
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