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kareemychm (3592739) writes | 19 minutes ago

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kareemychm (3592739) writes "If advertising content page has not sunk many readers made of' and you should have quality in this department. The web development track includes such classes as introduction to code, or any other code, in a separate file which can be called from other pages. The modern web audiences are quite discerning and they would hardly glance content by using keywords or terms that mimic how online users will search things. Most companies expect sales to decline in a down economy and while that may be true for the short Most of the images can be easily controlled through the CSS."
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Google's Megan Smith Would be First U.S. CTO Worthy of Title

theodp (442580) writes | 43 minutes ago

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theodp (442580) writes "Bloomberg is reporting that Google X's Megan Smith is the top candidate for U.S. Chief Technology Officer. With a BS/MS in Mechanical Engineering from MIT, and experience ranging from General Magic to Google, Smith would arguably be the first U.S. CTO worthy of the title (the outgoing U.S. CTO has a bachelor's in Econ; his predecessor has a master's in Public Policy). Now, if Smith can just reassure parents of boys that the girls-take-all approach to CS education funding she championed for Google won't become national policy, her confirmation should be smooth sailing!"

How to Disable DirectWrite in Google Chrome

NGOHQ (1078351) writes | 3 hours ago

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NGOHQ (1078351) writes "The latest version (37) of Google Chrome uses DirectWrite for font rendering on Windows PCs. DirectWrite is a DirectX API made for the purpose of high-quality, resolution-independent text rendering. On paper it sounds great, but some people might not like the new fonts appearance (blurry text on some websites). This guide will show you how to disable DirectWrite."
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Haiku debates kernel switch to Linux... or not.

taikedz (2782065) writes | 3 hours ago

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taikedz (2782065) writes "A very interesting discussion is taking place in the Haiku mailing list. A developer has created a working prototype implementation of the BeOS API layer on top of the Linux kernel, and he is wondering if the project is worth pursuing.

Both 'sides' make a lot of compelling arguments, and it gives a lot of insight into decisions that went into the Haiku project, both past and present."

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Ask Slashdot: What Old Technology Can't You Give Up?

Anonymous Coward writes | 4 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "It's the year 2014, and I still have a floppy drive installed on my computer. I don't know why; I don't own any floppy disks, and I haven't used one in probably a decade. But every time I put together a PC, it feels incomplete if I don't have one. I also have a Laserdisc player collecting dust at the bottom of my entertainment center, and I still use IRC to talk to a few friends. Software, hardware, or otherwise, what technology have you had a hard time letting go? (I don't want to put a hard limit on age, so you folks using flip-phones or playing on Dreamcasts or still inexplicably coding in Perl 4, feel free to contribute.)"
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Dell-Alienware Revamps Area-51 Gaming PC With Unique Trapezoid Chassis Design

MojoKid (1002251) writes | 4 hours ago

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MojoKid (1002251) writes "Dell's enthusiast Alienware brand has always stood out for its unique, other-worldly looks (sometimes good, sometimes, not so good) and there's such a thing as taking things to the next level, this might be it. However, there's more to this refresh than just shock value. It's actually a futuristic aesthetic with a rather purposeful design behind it. Today Alienware gave a sneak peek at their completely redesigned Alienware Area 51 desktop system. This refreshed system is unlike any previous Alienware rig you've seen. With a trapezoidal shape to its chassis, Dell-Alienware says you can place the Area-51 against a wall and not have to worry about thermals getting out of the control. That's because there's a controlled gap and a sharp angle to the chassis that ensures only a small part of the system actually rests near the wall, leaving extra room for hot air to escape up and away. This design also offers users easy access to rear IO ports. Despite the unique design, there's plenty of room for high end components inside. The retooled chassis can swallow up to three 300W double-wide full-length graphics cards. It also brings to the table Intel's latest and greatest Haswell-E in six-core or eight-core options, liquid cooled and nestled into Intel's X99 chipset. No word from Dell on the price but the new Area-51 is slated to start shipping in October."
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Study: Social Networks Have Negative Effect On Individual Welfare

Anonymous Coward writes | 4 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "A study of 50,000 people in Italy has found the impact of social networking on individual welfare to be "significantly negative." The researchers found that improvements in self-reported well-being occurred when online networking led to face-to-face interactions, but this effect was overwhelmed by the perceived losses in well-being (PDF) generated by interaction strictly through social networks. The researchers "highlight the role of discrimination and hate speech on social media which they say play a significant role in trust and well-being. Better moderation could significantly improve the well-being of the people who use social networks, they conclude.""
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Google Introduce HTML 5.1 Tag to Chrome

darthcamaro (735685) writes | 6 hours ago

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darthcamaro (735685) writes "Forget about HTML5, that's already passe — Google is already moving on to HTML5.1 support for the upcoming Chrome 38 release. Currently only a beta, one of the biggest things that web developers will notice is the use of the new "picture" tag which is a container for multiple image sizes/formats. Bottom line is it's a new way to think about the "IMG" tag that has existed since the first HTML spec."
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Geography Can Be Tough': Canada Trolls Russia For Ukraine Action

Anonymous Coward writes | 6 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Tensions may be rising between Russian and Canada on the political front, but when it comes to Twitter, the two countries are already engaged in an all-out flame war.

On Wednesday, the Canadian Joint Delegation to NATO lobbed a cheeky tweet in Russia's direction following a Russian military spokesperson's claims that the country's soldiers had "accidentally" crossed the Ukranian border earlier this week.

"Geography can be tough," wrote the Canadian government agency's official Twitter account. "Here's a guide for Russian soldiers who keep getting lost & 'accidentally' entering #Ukraine.""

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John Walker Dead at 77

Anonymous Coward writes | 6 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "The mastermind behind one of America’s most damaging spy rings has reportedly died. John A. Walker Jr., 77, was sentenced in 1986 to two life terms plus 10 years for selling U.S. secrets to the Soviets as a cryptologist in the Navy and after he retired.

Victor IIIs are unofficially known to the US Navy as the Walker class, since many of the improvements in quieting the boats and in providing them with more effective sensors were the product of the activities of the Walker spy ring."

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The Apache Software Foundation now accepting BitCoin for donations

rbowen (112459) writes | 8 hours ago

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rbowen (112459) writes "The Apache Software Foundation is the latest not-for-profit organization to accept bitcoin donations, as pointed out by a user on the Bitcoin subreddit.

The organization is well known for their catalog of open-source software, including the ubiquitous Apache web server, Hadoop, Tomcat, Cassandra, and about 150 other projects. Users in the community have been eager to support their efforts using digital currency for quite a while.

The Foundation accepts donations in many different forms: Amazon, PayPal, and they’ll even accept donated cars.

On their contribution page the Apache Software Foundation has published a bitcoin address and QR code. As of this afternoon, the address has already collected on the order of 4 BTC."

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Intel's Haswell-E desktop CPU debuts with eight cores, DDR4 memory

crookedvulture (1866146) writes | 9 hours ago

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crookedvulture (1866146) writes "Intel has updated its high-end desktop platform with a new CPU-and-chipset combo. The Haswell-E processor has up to eight cores, 20MB of cache, and 40 lanes of PCI Express 3.0. It also sports a quad-channel memory controller primed for next-gen DDR4 modules. The companion X99 chipset adds a boatload of I/O, including 10 SATA ports, native USB 3.0 support, and provisions for M.2 and SATA Express storage devices. Thanks to the extra CPU cores, performance is much improved in multithreaded applications. These legacy comparisons, which include dozens of CPUs dating back to 2011, provide some interesting context for just how fast the new Core i7-5960X really is. Intel had to dial back the chip's clock speeds to accommodate the extra cores, though, and that concession can translate to slower gaming performance than Haswell CPUs with fewer, faster cores. Haswell-E looks like a clear win for applications that can exploit its prodigious CPU horsepower and I/O bandwidth, but it's clearly not the best CPU for everything."

This 'SimCity 4' Region With 107 Million People Took Eight Months of Planning

Jason Koebler (3528235) writes | 10 hours ago

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Jason Koebler (3528235) writes "Peter Richie spent eight months planning and building a megacity in vanilla SimCity 4, and the end result is mind-boggling: 107.7 million people living in one massive, sprawling region.
"Traffic is a nightmare, both above ground and under," Richie said. "The massive amount of subway lines and subway stations are still congested during all times of the day in all neighborhoods of each and every mega-city in the region. The roadways are clogged at all times, but people still persist in trying to use them.""

Mozilla to Support Key Pinning in Firefox 32

Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes | 11 hours ago

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Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "Mozilla is planning to add support for public-key pinning in its Firefox browser in an upcoming version. In version 32, which would be the next stable version of the browser, Firefox will have key pins for a long list of sites, including many of Mozilla’s own sites, all of the sites pinned in Google Chrome and several Twitter sites.

Public-key pinning has emerged as an important defense against a variety of attacks, especially man-in-the-middle attacks and the issuance of fraudulent certificates. In the last few years Google, Mozilla and other organizations have discovered several cases of attackers using fraudulent certificates for high-value sites, including Gmail. The function essentially ties a public key, or set of keys, issued by known-good certificate authorities to a given domain. So if a user’s browser encounters a site that’s presenting a certificate that isn’t included in the set of pinned public keys for that domain, it will then reject the connection. The idea is to prevent attackers from using fake certificates in order to intercept secure traffic between a user and the target site.

The first pinset will include all of the sites in the Chromium pinset used by Chrome, along with Mozilla sites and high-value sites such as Facebook. Later versions will add pins for Twitter, a long list of Google domains, Tor, Dropbox and other major sites."

Particle physics to aid nuclear cleanup

mdsolar (1045926) writes | 11 hours ago

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mdsolar (1045926) writes "Cosmic rays can help scientists do something no one else can: safely image the interior of the nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi plant.... [M]uon tomography, is similar to taking an X-ray, only it uses naturally produced muons. These particles don’t damage the imaged materials and, because they already stream through everything on Earth, they can be used to image even the most sensitive objects. Better yet, a huge amount of shielding is needed to stop muons from passing through an object, making it nearly impossible to hide from muon tomography.

“Everything around you is constantly being radiographed by muons,” says Christopher Morris, who leads the Los Alamos muon tomography team. “All you have to do is set some detectors above and below it, and measure the angles well enough to make a picture.”

By determining how muons scatter as they interact with electrons and nuclei within the item, the team’s software creates a three-dimensional picture of what’s inside.... To prove the technology, the Los Alamos team shipped a demo detector system to a small, working nuclear reactor in a Toshiba facility in Kawasaki, Japan. There, they placed one detector on either side of the reactor core.

“When we analyzed our data we discovered that in addition to the fuel in the reactor core, they had put a few fuel bundles off to the side that we didn’t know about,” says Morris. “They were really impressed that not only could we image the core, but that we also found those bundles.”

Based on that successful test, Toshiba signed an agreement with Los Alamos and later with Decision Sciences to design and manufacture muon-detector components for use at Fukushima Daiichi."

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Watch This Inventor Survive a Fireworks Blast in a Metal Suit

Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes | 12 hours ago

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Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "Labor Day is nigh, and with it the official end of summer. It’s time to pack away the umbrellas and beach towels, and perhaps spend a few minutes flipping through photos of all the fun times you had over the past couple months: the grilling, the trips, the fireworks oh yes, the fireworks Chances are pretty good that you’ve set off more than a few fireworks in your time. But Colin Furze, the British inventor and YouTube celebrity who once co-hosted Sky1’s Gadget Geeks? Well, he puts everybody’s love of fireworks to shame. He loves fireworks so much, in fact, that he built a giant metal suit so he could stand in the middle of an epic pyrotechnic display. No matter how good your own engineering skills (or strong your courage), it's inadvisable to try this at home. But it's sure fun to watch."
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