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And now for 4D printing

Anonymous Coward writes | 38 minutes ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Now that 3D printing has captured our imagination, just think what adding time to the equation could do. By Dan Raviv."
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Tribler Makes BitTorrent Completely Anonymous and Impossible to Compromise

giulioprisco (2448064) writes | 2 hours ago

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giulioprisco (2448064) writes "A group of researchers from the Delft University of Technology are about to do something never done before: make BitTorrent completely anonymous and impossible to shut down. Utilizing a dedicated Tor-like network, Tribler allows users to search and download torrents without risking any of their personal information or being tracked down, the researchers claim. Prior to The Pirate Bay being taken down, the creator Peter Sunde mentioned that he wished it would have died quicker so others could improve and innovate the technology. It looks like Sunde got his wish after all."
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Researchers discover SS7 flaw, allowing total access to ANY cell phone anywhere.

krakman (1121803) writes | 4 hours ago

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krakman (1121803) writes "Researchers discovered security flaws in SS7 that allow listening to private phone calls and intercepting text messages on a potentially massive scale – even when cellular networks are using the most advanced encryption now available.

The flaws, to be reported at a hacker conference in Hamburg this month, are actually functions built into SS7 for other purposes – such as keeping calls connected as users speed down highways, switching from cell tower to cell tower – that hackers can repurpose for surveillance because of the lax security on the network. It is thought that these flaws were used for bugging Chancellor Merkels phone earlier.

Those skilled at the housekeeping functions built into SS7 can locate callers anywhere in the world, listen to calls as they happen or record hundreds of encrypted calls and texts at a time for later decryption. There also is potential to defraud users and cellular carriers by using SS7 functions, the researchers say.

Another result of Security being thought of after the fact, as opposed to part of the initial design."

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Lockheed Martin's 100 MW Compact Fusion Nuclear Reactor

Roger Pink (3858149) writes | 6 hours ago

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Roger Pink (3858149) writes "When I first heard the announcement regarding Lockheed Martin's plan to produce a compact fusion reactor (CFR) in five years, I was pretty skeptical. Then a lot of skeptical articles were written and I felt my first instinct was validated. The only problem is I think I was wrong. Having researched this story for an article I've written, I'm pretty much convinced this is actually happening.

This isn't cold fusion. Back in the late eighties a couple chemists thought they had fusion and rushed to publish out of fear of having the credit stolen. It was a complete failure of the scientific process and it set fusion back two decades. This time is different. The project leader has over a decade of experience studying and modeling fusion. The institution has a history of novel technologies and absolutely no reason to risk their credibility.

In short, it really seams like it's more likely there will be a CFR in the next ten years then not. Here's an article for a little background why:

http://insights.globalspec.com..."

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You can now explore Google Street View with virtual reality

mpicpp (3454017) writes | 6 hours ago

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mpicpp (3454017) writes "Google Cardboard, the tech giant's low-cost virtual reality headset that's literally made of cardboard and works with phones, is now compatible with Street View.

Google announced on Tuesday that users can wear the headset and experience Google Maps Street View in a new, immersive way.

The headset, which costs as little as $10 and is available for purchase online (or you can make one at home), works with any Android phone that can fit within the holder — however, 4.7-inch devices are the limit. Users then open Street View in Google Maps on the phone, double-tap a lower-right, look-around icon on the corner of the display to sync everything up. After that, the headset shows a 360-degree view of the location. This means it's possible to simulate looking up at a skyscraper in Shanghai while sitting in an apartment in the U.S."

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Satellite captures glowing plants from space

sciencehabit (1205606) writes | 11 hours ago

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sciencehabit (1205606) writes "About 1% of the light that strikes plants is re-emitted as a faint, fluorescent glow—a measure of photosynthetic activity. Today, scientists released a map of this glow as measured by the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, a NASA satellite launched in July with the goal of mapping the net amount of carbon in the atmosphere. The map reveals that tropical rainforests near the equator are actively sucking up carbon, while the Corn Belt in the eastern United States, near the end of its growing season, is also a sink. Higher resolution fluorescence mapping could one day be used to help assess crop yields and how they respond to drought and heat in a changing climate."
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Skeptics would like media to stop calling science deniers "skeptics"

Layzej (1976930) writes | 7 hours ago

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Layzej (1976930) writes "Prominent scientists, science communicators, and skeptic activists, are calling on the news media to stop using the word “skeptic” when referring to those who refuse to accept the reality of climate change, and instead refer to them by what they really are: science deniers. “Not all individuals who call themselves climate change skeptics are deniers. But virtually all deniers have falsely branded themselves as skeptics. By perpetrating this misnomer, journalists have granted undeserved credibility to those who reject science and scientific inquiry.”"
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ICANN Hacked Including Root DNS Systems

schwit1 (797399) writes | 8 hours ago

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schwit1 (797399) writes "Attackers sent staff spoofed emails appearing to coming from icann.org. The organization notes it was a “spear phishing” attack, suggesting employees clicked on a link in the messages, and then typed their usernames and passwords into a bogus webpage, providing hackers with the keys to their accounts.

“The attack resulted in the compromise of the email credentials of several ICANN staff members,” the announcement reads, noting that the attack happened in late November and was discovered a week later.

With those details, the hackers then managed to access a number of systems within ICANN, including the Centralized Zone Data System (CZDS), the wiki pages of the Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC), the domain registration Whois portal, and the organization’s blog."

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Apple 'failing to protect Chinese factory workers'

mrspoonsi (2955715) writes | 12 hours ago

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mrspoonsi (2955715) writes "Poor treatment of workers in Chinese factories which make Apple products has been discovered by an undercover BBC Panorama investigation. Filming on an iPhone 6 production line showed Apple's promises to protect workers were routinely broken. It found standards on workers' hours, ID cards, dormitories, work meetings and juvenile workers were being breached at the Pegatron factories. Apple said it strongly disagreed with the programme's conclusions. Exhausted workers were filmed falling asleep on their 12-hour shifts at the Pegatron factories on the outskirts of Shanghai. One undercover reporter, working in a factory making parts for Apple computers, had to work 18 days in a row despite repeated requests for a day off. Another reporter, whose longest shift was 16 hours, said: "Every time I got back to the dormitories, I wouldn't want to move. "Even if I was hungry I wouldn't want to get up to eat. I just wanted to lie down and rest. I was unable to sleep at night because of the stress.""

Hackers' Shutdown of 'The Interview' Confirms Coding is a Superpower

theodp (442580) writes | 9 hours ago

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theodp (442580) writes "The idea of programming as a superpower was touched upon by CS teacher Alfred Thompson back in 2010, but it became a rallying call of sorts for the Hour of Code after Dropbox CEO Drew Houston described coding as "the closest thing we have to a superpower" in a Code.org video that went viral. And if the kids who learned to code with the President last week were dubious about the power of coding, this week's decision by Sony to scrap the release of the satirical film 'The Interview' after a massive hack attack should put aside any doubts, especially after new revelations that Sony had reached out to the White House for help and screened the film for administration officials back in June. White House press secretary Josh Earnest said Thursday that the Obama Administration is viewing the Sony attack as a 'serious national security matter' and is considering a range of possible options as a response, which could turn things into a contest of U.S. Superpower vs. Coding Superpower. In case it wasn't mentioned last week, remember to always use your coding superpower for good, kids!"

Critical Git security vulnerability announced

Anonymous Coward writes | 9 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Github has announced a security vulnerability and has encourage users to update their Git clients as soon as possible. The blog post reads in part: "A critical Git security vulnerability has been announced today, affecting all versions of the official Git client and all related software that interacts with Git repositories, including GitHub for Windows and GitHub for Mac. Because this is a client-side only vulnerability, github.com and GitHub Enterprise are not directly affected. The vulnerability concerns Git and Git-compatible clients that access Git repositories in a case-insensitive or case-normalizing filesystem. An attacker can craft a malicious Git tree that will cause Git to overwrite its own .git/config file when cloning or checking out a repository, leading to arbitrary command execution in the client machine. Git clients running on OS X (HFS+) or any version of Microsoft Windows (NTFS, FAT) are exploitable through this vulnerability. Linux clients are not affected if they run in a case-sensitive filesystem....Updated versions of GitHub for Windows and GitHub for Mac are available for immediate download, and both contain the security fix on the Desktop application itself and on the bundled version of the Git command-line client.""

Marissa Mayer's reinvention of Yahoo! stumbles

schnell (163007) writes | yesterday

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schnell (163007) writes "The New York Times Magazine has an in-depth profile of Marissa Mayer's time at the helm of Yahoo!, detailing her bold plans to reinvent the company and spark a Jobs-ian turnaround through building great new products. But some investors are saying that her product focus (to the point of micromanaging) hasn't generated results, and that the company should give up on trying to create the next iPod, merge with AOL to cut costs and focus on the unglamorous core business that it has. Is it time for Yahoo! to "grow up" and set its sights lower?"

Extracting Data from the Microsoft Data

Anonymous Coward writes | 11 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "The Microsoft Band introduced last month hosts a slew of amazing sensors, but like so many wearable computing devices, users are unable to access their own data. A Brown University professor decompiles the app, finds that the data is transmitted to the Microsoft "cloud", and explains how to intercept the traffic to retrieve the raw minute-by-minute data captured by the Band."
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Grinch Vulnerability Could Put a Hole In Your Linux Stocking

itwbennett (1594911) writes | yesterday

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itwbennett (1594911) writes "In a blog post Tuesday, security service provider Alert Logic warned of a Linux vulnerability, named grinch after the well-known Dr. Seuss character, that could provide attackers with unfettered root access. The fundamental flaw resides in the Linux authorization system, which can inadvertently allow privilege escalation, granting a user full administrative access. Alert Logic warned that Grinch could be as severe as the Shellshock flaw that roiled the Internet in September."
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