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Ford Wants To Eliminate Car Keys, Start Cars With Fingerprints

cartechboy (2660665) writes | 2 minutes ago

0

cartechboy (2660665) writes "For as long as you've probably been alive you started a car with a key. Whether that be a metal key or now a plastic transponder that allows you to push a button, you needed a device to start a vehicle. Now Ford's looking to revolutionize the way we start our vehicles. A new patent details how you would start a vehicle using only your fingerprint. It's not stopping with just your fingerprint and starting a car, no, it's looking to have a car measure your vitals such as heart rate, temperature, and other biometric data. Why? Aside from the security aspect of preventing people from stealing your car, there's a huge comfort and safety angle here. Sensors embedded in the steering wheel and seats could gauge body temperature and adjust interior temperatures accordingly to keep you comfortable. From the safety angle, sensors could determine whether drivers are sleepy or if there's a medical emergency. Imagine a vehicle that could stop itself if suddenly the driver experiences a medical emergency such as a heart attack or seizure. This all might sound scary to you, but it's definitely the future. The question now is how long before it's reality?"

Back to faxes: Doctors can't exchange digital medical records

nbauman (624611) writes | 5 minutes ago

0

nbauman (624611) writes "Doctors with one medical records system can't exchange information with systems made by other vendors, including those at their own hospitals, according to the New York Times. An ophthalmologist spent half a million dollars on a system and still keeps sending faxes. If doctors can't exchange records, they'll face a 1% Medicare penalty. The largest vendor is Epic Systems, Madison, WI, which holds almost half the medical records in the U.S. A RAND report described Epic as a “closed” platform that made it “challenging and costly” for hospitals to interconnect. UC Davis has a staff of 22 to keep everything communicating. Epic charges a fee to send data to some non-Epic systems. Congress held hearings. Epic hired a lobbyist. Epic's founder, billionaire computer science major Judith Faulkner, said that Epic was one of the first to establish code and standards for secure interchange, which included user authentication provisions and a legally binding contract. She said the federal government, which gave $24 billion incentive payments to doctors for computerization, should have done that. The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology said that it was a "top priority" and they just wrote a 10-year vision statement and agenda for it."
Link to Original Source

America's F-22 Raptor (at $422 million per plane) is Wasting its Time Over Syria

Anonymous Coward writes | about half an hour ago

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An anonymous reader writes "With much fanfare, the F-22 Raptor, developed in the early 1990's at a cost of $422 million per plane, has taken to the skies over Syria. It has dropped precision munitions on various targets to much fanfare. However, when you consider the enemy, ISIS in Syria who has no air force and no anti-air weapons that could offer any resistance to the advance 5th generation fighter, the shine fades pretty quickly. However, there could be a much deeper motive: to prove once and for all that the F-35, the world's most expensive weapons program in history is actually a good idea:

"Maybe the F-22's debut is related to another aircraft. The F-22 production line has been shut down, so the 187 Raptors still flying (that number is bound to decrease due to accidents and age) are the first and the last. But what is coming is 2,443 of the Pentagon's other ultra-controversial fifth-generation stealth fighter — the F-35. The Raptor sat out the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya. Now that an F-22 stealth fighter has flown one combat mission, it might be easier to defend the F-35 against its numerous critics who complain about the aircraft's cost and performance.""

Link to Original Source

Earth Gets Another Quasi-Moon

The Bad Astronomer (563217) writes | about half an hour ago

1

The Bad Astronomer (563217) writes "Astronomers have found a new asteroid, 2014 OL339, that is a quasi-moon of the Earth. Discovered accidentally earlier this year, the 150-meter asteroid has an orbit that is more elliptical than Earth's, but has a period of almost exactly one year. It isn't bound to Earth like a real moon, but displays apparent motion as if it did, making it one of several known quasi-moons."

Bangladesh considers building world's 5th-largest data center in earthquake zone

Anonymous Coward writes | 46 minutes ago

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An anonymous reader writes "From the article: "The Bangladesh Ministry of Information is considering the establishment of a Tier 4 data centre in Kaliakair, in the Gazipur region, an ambitious build which would constitute the fifth largest data centre in the world, if completed. And if it survives – the site mooted for the project is prone to earthquakes.

"Earthquake activity in the environs is discouraging, with one nearby earthquake seven months ago in Ranir Bazar (3.8), and no less than ten within the same tectonic zone over the last three years, the largest of which measured 4.5 on the Richter scale.""

Link to Original Source

Hundreds of Police Agencies distributing spyware and keystroke logger

realized (2472730) writes | about an hour ago

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realized (2472730) writes "For years, local law enforcement agencies around the country have told parents that installing ComputerCOP software is the “first step” in protecting their children online.

As official as it looks,ComputerCOP is actually just spyware, generally bought in bulk from a New York company that appears to do nothing but market this software to local government agencies.

The way ComputerCOP works is neither safe nor secure. It isn’t particularly effective either, except for generating positive PR for the law enforcement agencies distributing it. As security software goes, we observed a product with a keystroke-capturing function, also called a “keylogger,” that could place a family’s personal information at extreme risk by transmitting what a user types over the Internet to third-party servers without encryption.

EFF conducted a security review of ComputerCOP while also following the paper trail of public records to see how widely the software has spread. Based on ComputerCOP’s own marketing information, we identified approximately 245 agencies in more than 35 states, plus the U.S. Marshals, that have used public funds (often the proceeds from property seized during criminal investigations) to purchase and distribute ComputerCOP. One sheriff’s department even bought a copy for every family in its county.

Some of the agencies that have used it include U.S. Marshals — Under Director John Clark, Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office gave out the program for "free" to 6,700 foster parents, Riverside County District Attorney's Office, San Diego County District Attorney's Office, Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office,

Complete list of agencies that use the software compiled by the eff click here"

The $1,200 DIY Gunsmithing Machine

Anonymous Coward writes | 1 hour ago

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An anonymous reader writes "You may recall Cody Wilson as the man behind the world's first 3D-printed gun. He built a company behind the ideals of DIY gunmaking, and now he's come back with another device: the Ghost Gunner, a CNC mill designed to create the lower receiver of an AR-15 rifle. "That simple chunk of metal has become the epicenter of a gun control firestorm. A lower receiver is the body of the gun that connects its stock, barrel, magazine and other parts. As such, it’s also the rifle’s most regulated element. Mill your own lower receiver at home, however, and you can order the rest of the parts from online gun shops, creating a semi-automatic weapon with no serial number, obtained with no background check, no waiting period or other regulatory hurdles. Some gun control advocates call it a “ghost gun.” Selling that untraceable gun body is illegal, but no law prevents you from making one." Wilson's goal is still to render government gun regulation useless, even as debate rages on banning this kind of manufacturing."
Link to Original Source

Pebble drops price, adds new Jawbone and Misfit fitness apps - CNET

feedfeeder (1749978) writes | 1 hour ago

0


MobileMarketing Magazine

Pebble drops price, adds new Jawbone and Misfit fitness apps
CNET
The Pebble and Pebble Steel get true background fitness tracking and support for apps, along with lower prices: at last, could we have a smartwatch end up being a serious fitness band replacement? by Scott Stein @jetscott; September 30, 2014 10:00 AM...
Pebble update enables full activity, sleep tracking; support for Misfit, Jawbone ... ZDNet
Pebble Drops Prices, Boosts Activity TrackingPC Magazine

all 107 news articles

Link to Original Source

DARPA Working on 'Unhackable' Embedded Software

Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes | 1 hour ago

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Trailrunner7 (1100399) writes "DARPA is the birthplace of the network that eventually became today’s Internet, and the agency has spent the decades since it released that baby out into the world trying to find new ways defend it. That task has grown ever more complex and difficult, and now DARPA is working on a new kind of software that is provably secure for specific properties.

Arati Prabhakar, the director of DARPA, said that the agency, which performs advanced research and development for the United States military and government, has been working on the software in the hopes that it can run on some embedded systems. The software isn’t meant as a general purpose operating system for servers or desktops, but Prabhakar said that the agency believes it has plenty of applications.

“Unfortunately there’s not going to be a silver bullet. There are pieces of this we think can become tractable. One of our programs is working on software that’s unhackabale for specific security properties,” said Prabhakar, who was speaking at the Washington Post Cybersecurity Summit on Wednesday. “We’re working on a mathematical proof that the software can’t be hacked from the outside. It’s for embedded systems with a modest number of lines of code.”"

Firejail – A Security Sandbox for Mozilla Firefox

ttyX (1546893) writes | 1 hour ago

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ttyX (1546893) writes "Firejail is a SUID sandbox program that reduces the risk of security breaches by restricting the running environment of untrusted applications. The core technology behind Firejail is Linux Namespaces, a virtualization technology available in Linux kernel. It allows a process and all its descendants to have their own private view of the globally shared kernel resources, such as the network stack, process table, mount table, IPC space."
Link to Original Source

Executive order will require antimicrobial stewardship

tomhath (637240) writes | 1 hour ago

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tomhath (637240) writes "An Executive Order signed recently will require most health care providers in the US to have antimicrobial stewardship programs.

The Federal Government will work domestically and internationally to detect, prevent, and control illness and death related to antibiotic-resistant infections by implementing measures that reduce the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and help ensure the continued availability of effective therapeutics for the treatment of bacterial infections.

In addition, the order will restrict the use of antibiotics in livestock.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in HHS, in coordination with the Department of Agriculture (USDA), shall continue taking steps to eliminate the use of medically important classes of antibiotics for growth promotion purposes in food-producing animals.

"

Unexplained out-of-band WIndows DVD patch

davidwr (791652) writes | 1 hour ago

0

davidwr (791652) writes "Microsoft released September 2014 update for DVD playback in Windows 7 SP1

as an out-of-band "Important" update yesterday without explaining why it was rushed instead of waiting two weeks.

Microsoft knows that patching annoys system administrators and others and typically doesn't do out of band updates without a good reason. Unlike the recent out-of-band Russian Time Zone update, there isn't an obvious to be a "you must install this by a certain date or something will break" reason to rush this.

Does anyone know why Microsoft didn't either 1) wait two weeks or 2) provide a clearer explanation of why this is important enough to push out early?"

Scientists Plan on Turning the Moon Into a Giant Particle Detector

Zothecula (1870348) writes | 1 hour ago

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Zothecula (1870348) writes "What is the Moon good for? Aside from inspiring poets, helping you see at night, and giving Neil Armstrong some place for a stroll, what can you do with it? If you ask scientists at the University of Southampton, they’ll tell you that it makes a cracking particle detector. With the help of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) radio telescope, the team hopes to use the mass of the satellite to detect the most energetic particles known; Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) cosmic rays."
Link to Original Source

UK government switches vehicle taxation over to beta system, which breaks

Anonymous Coward writes | 2 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "When you pay the tax on a road vehicle in the UK, you used to get a paper "tax disk" to affix to the inside of your car windshield. However the relevant records are documented electronically anyway, inspiring the government to replace the paper system with a purely online one. Unfortunately said system was still in beta when it launched today and predictably, it has broken under user demand. No alternative system is available. (The licencing agency actually ran out of the paper disks more than a month ago, and has been printing them out on normal office paper and asking vehicle owners to cut out the circle themselves.) The initiative is part of a larger "digital-first", restructuring of how the government provides services aimed at "meeting user needs"."

Chinese Worried About Terrorist Pigeons

Anonymous Coward writes | 2 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "A pleasant ceremony was planned for the 65th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China. A ceremony at Tiananmen Square would release 10,000 pigeons at sunrise to symbolize an era of peace. Unfortunately, even symbols of peace can apparently remind people of violence. Chinese authorities searched all 10,000 pigeons for "dangerous materials," after the government was concerned they might be used for attacks. The pigeons' feathers were checked, and they were given a cavity search as well. The reports did not indicate what kind of "dangerous materials" these pigeons might be carrying. It's unclear whether any pigeons disclosed terror plots under interrogation."
Link to Original Source

Aral Sea Basin Almost Completely Dry

Anonymous Coward writes | 2 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "In 2000, NASA began taking satellite images of the Aral Sea in central Asia, which was once the fourth-largest inland lake in the world. At that time, there was an expansive eastern basin, and smaller basins to the north and west. In images recorded just last week, we see that the eastern basin is completely gone, and the western basin a just thin strip of water. The local fishing industry has been devastated, old ship graveyards now rest on dry ground, and salt-heavy sand is being blown around the region, causing health issues. Most of the lake's decline is attributable to human intervention: "In the 1950s, two of the region’s major rivers – the Amu Darya and and the Syr Darya – were diverted by the Soviet government to provide irrigation for cotton production in Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, starving the Aral. It has been diminishing ever since, with the sea level dropping 16 meters between 1960 and 1996, according to the World Bank. Water levels are believed to be down to less than 10 per cent of what they were five decades ago." Low levels of rain and snow didn't help."
Link to Original Source

Which Cars Get the Most Traffic Tickets?

Anonymous Coward writes | 3 hours ago

1

An anonymous reader writes "Have you ever been pulled over for a traffic stop and wondered if your sporty car was what caught the officer's attention? Ever had an officer pass up your clunker to snag a flashier vehicle? Well, there's now some data showing which vehicles accumulate the most tickets. According to a study by Insurance.com, drivers of the Subaru WRX, Pontiac GTO, and Scion FR-S get a higher percentage of tickets than drivers of any other cars. At the bottom of the list, we see vehicles such as the Ford Ecosport, the Land Rover LR4, and Chevy Sportvan. They have a widget that will let you see data on your own make/model, if you're curious"
Link to Original Source

Reserve Bank ordered to pay back R250m to Mark Shuttleworth

Anonymous Coward writes | 3 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "South Africa-born tech entrepreneur and world’s first space tourist Mark Shuttleworth has been awarded R250m – with interest – by the court of appeal following a lengthy legal battle over exchange control levies which saw that amount docked from his R2.5bn fortune when he sought to repatriate the money overseas."
Link to Original Source

Insider Incidents And High-Profile Crimes Increasing

Anonymous Coward writes | 3 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "The number of reported security incidents rose 48 percent this year to 42.8 million – which is the equivalent of 117,339 attacks per day. As security incidents grow in frequency, the associated costs of managing and mitigating breaches are also increasing. Globally, the estimated reported average financial loss from cybersecurity incidents was $2.7 million – a 34 percent increase over 2013. Insiders have become the most-cited culprits of cybercrime – but in many cases, they unwittingly compromise data through loss of mobile devices or targeted phishing schemes."

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