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What should parents do about cyber bullying?

Brookechloe (3797491) writes | 11 minutes ago

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Brookechloe (3797491) writes "Children’s bullying each other in schools is something which has been taking place for a number of years. With respect to the internet however, the problem of bullying has grown. Apart from bullying in schools, children have begun to bully their classmates and others via the internet as well causing to negative implications. According to StopCyberBullying.org, cyber bullying is termed as when any child, teenager or adolescent is harassed, threatened or humiliated by another over the internet and other digital technologies."
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More Eye Candy Coming to Windows 10

jones_supa (887896) writes | 43 minutes ago

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jones_supa (887896) writes "Microsoft is expected to release a new build of the Windows 10 Technical Preview in the very near future, according to their own words. The only build so far to be released to the public is 9841 but the next iteration will likely be in the 9860 class of releases. With this new build, Microsoft has polished up the animations that give the OS a more comprehensive feel. When you open a new window, it flies out on to the screen from the icon and when you minimize it, it collapses back in to the icon on the taskbar. It is a slick animation and if you have used OS X, it is similar to the one used to collapse windows back in to the dock."

'Endrun' Networks: Help in Danger Zones

kierny (102954) writes | 1 hour ago

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kierny (102954) writes "Drawing on networking protocols designed to support NASA's interplanetary missions, two information security researchers have created a networking system that's designed to transmit information securely and reliably in even the worst conditions. Dubbed Endrun, and debuted at Black Hat Europe, its creators hope the delay-tolerant and disruption-tolerant system — which runs on Raspberry Pi — could be deployed everywhere from Ebola hot zones in Liberia, to war zones in Syria, to demonstrators Ferguson."
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Britain May "Go Medieval" On Terrorists And Charge Them With High Treason

Anonymous Coward writes | 1 hour ago

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An anonymous reader writes "The British government have been discussing charging Britons that swear allegiance and fight for ISIS with the crime of high treason under the medieval era Treason Act of 1351. It is estimated that between 500 — 1,500 Britons fought for ISIS. Civil rights activists consider the idea “ludicrous” although it is unclear if they think there is a free speech or conscience issue. Treason was punishable by death until 1998. The last person to be executed for treason by Britain was William Joyce who was hung for his role as the Nazi propagandist "Lord Haw-Haw.""
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Ebola Outbreak Could Make Nation Turn to Science

HughPickens.com (3830033) writes | 1 hour ago

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HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Andy Borowitz writes at The New Yorker that there is a deep-seated fear among some Americans that an Ebola outbreak could make the country turn to science. According to Borowitz, writing tongue in cheek, leading anti-science activists expressed their concern that the American people, wracked with anxiety over the possible spread of the virus, might desperately look to science to save the day. “If you put them under enough stress, perfectly rational people will panic and start believing in science," says Harland Dorrinson, a prominent anti-science activist from Springfield, Missouri. Dorrinson adds that he worries about a “slippery slope” situation, “in which a belief in science leads to a belief in math, which in turn fosters a dangerous dependence on facts.”"

NASA's HI-SEAS Project Suggests a Women-only Mars Mission

globaljustin (574257) writes | 1 hour ago

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globaljustin (574257) writes "Alan Drysdale, a systems analyst in advanced life support and a contractor with NASA concluded, “Small women haven’t been demonstrated to be appreciably dumber than big women or big men, so there’s no reason to choose larger people for a flight crew when it’s brain power you want,” says Drysdale. “The logical thing to do is to fly small women.”"
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Developers, IT Still Racking Up (Mostly) High Salaries

Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes | 2 hours ago

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Nerval's Lobster (2598977) writes "Software development and IT remain common jobs among those in the higher brackets, although not the topmost one, according to a new study (with graph) commissioned by NPR. Among those earning between $58,000 and $72,000, IT was the sixth-most-popular job, while software developers came in tenth place. In the next bracket up (earning between $72,000 and $103,000), IT rose to third, with software development just behind in fourth place. As incomes increased another level ($103,000 to $207,000), software developers did even better, coming in second behind managers, although IT dropped off the list entirely. In the top percentile ($207,000 and above), neither software developers nor IT staff managed to place; this is a segment chiefly occupied by physicians (in first place), managers, chief executives, lawyers, and salespeople who are really good at their jobs. In other words, it seems like a good time to be in IT, provided you have a particular skillset."
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Where will Hadoop be in 5 years?

jenwike (2888285) writes | 3 hours ago

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jenwike (2888285) writes "Some experts in open source say working in the field is more about common sense than creed. Doug Cutting of Cloudera speaks from working on projects like Hadoop and Lucene. In this interview with Opensource.com, prior to his keynote at the All Things Open conference this week, he dives into open source adoption in the enterprise and where he thinks Hadoop will be in 5 years."
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Barometers in iPhones: Crowdsourcing weather forecasts

cryptoz (878581) writes | 3 hours ago

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cryptoz (878581) writes "Apple is now adding barometers to its mobile devices: both new iPhones have valuable atmospheric pressure sensors being used for HealthKit (step counting). Since many Android devices have been carrying barometers for years, scientists like Cliff Mass have been using the sensor data to improve weather forecasts. Open source data collection projects like PressureNet on Android automatically collect and send the atmospheric sensor data to researchers."

Google changes 'to fight piracy' by highlighting legal sites

mrspoonsi (2955715) writes | 3 hours ago

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mrspoonsi (2955715) writes "Google has announced changes to its search engine in an attempt to curb online piracy. The company has long been criticised for enabling people to find sites to download entertainment illegally. The entertainment industry has argued that illegal sites should be "demoted" in search results. The new measures, mostly welcomed by music trade group the BPI, will instead point users towards legal alternatives such as Spotify and Google Play. Google will now list these legal services in a box at the top of the search results, as well as in a box on the right-hand side of the page. Crucially, however, these will be adverts — meaning if legal sites want to appear there, they will need to pay Google for the placement."

Driven by care needs, will it be seniors who drive wider acceptance of robots?

Hallie Siegel (2948665) writes | 4 hours ago

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Hallie Siegel (2948665) writes "Tony Prescott, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience and Director of the Sheffield Center of Robotics believes that the medical industry could be at the forefront of changing the public perception of robotics. Why? Because this is an industry that already understands how paramount it is, when dealing with the elderly, disabled and ill, to provide a service that is helpful, friendly and nonthreatening."
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Turning up the Heat to Make Kelp a Viable Source of Biofuel

Zothecula (1870348) writes | 4 hours ago

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Zothecula (1870348) writes "Biofuels may indeed offer a greener alternative to fossil fuels, but they do raise at least one concern – crops grown as biofuel feedstock could take up farmland and use water that would otherwise be used to grow crops for much-needed food. That's why some scientists have looked to seaweed as a feedstock. Kelp is particularly attractive, in that it's abundant and grows extremely quickly, although its fuel yields haven't been particularly impressive. That could be about to change, however, thanks to a newly-developed hydrothermal process."
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WSO2 Starts War Over Who Owns API Chaining

Foofoobar (318279) writes | 4 hours ago

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Foofoobar (318279) writes "WSO2 is refusing to budge saying (in the words of the CEO): 'API Chaining is not a set of words trade marked by you. We are free to use it any way we want' after creator of API Chaining, Owen Rubel, asked them to stop promoting their work as his own. This has led to an exchange on public forums with their CTO Paul Fremantle publicly stating they will not honor the Apache License that the works is released and copyrighted under."

How Lobby Groups Rejected the Canadian Government's Plan to Combat Patent Trolls

Anonymous Coward writes | 4 hours ago

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An anonymous reader writes "Michael Geist reports that according to documents recently obtained under the Access to Information Act, the Canadian government quietly proposed a series of reforms to combat patent trolls including new prohibitions on demand letters, powers to the courts to stop patent forum shopping, and giving competition authorities the ability to deal with patent troll anti-competitive activity. The problem? Business lobby groups warned against the "unintended consequences" of patent reforms."
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IBM Paying $1.5 Billion to Shed Its Chip Division

helix2301 (1105613) writes | 5 hours ago

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helix2301 (1105613) writes "IBM will pay $1.5 billion to Globalfoundries in order to shed its costly chip division. IBM will make payments to the chipmaker over three years, but it took a $4.7 billion charge for the third quarter when it reported earnings Monday. The company fell short of Wall Street profit expectations and revenue slid 4 percent, sending shares down 8 percent before the opening bell."
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The Largest Ship in the World is Being Built in Korea

HughPickens.com (3830033) writes | yesterday

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HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Alastair Philip Wiper writes that at at 194 feet wide and 1,312 feet long, the Matz Maersk Triple E is the largest ship ever built capable of carrying 18,000 20-foot containers. Its propellers weigh 70 tons apiece and it is too big for the Panama Canal, though it can shimmy through the Suez. A U-shaped hull design allows more room below deck, providing capacity for 18,000 shipping containers arranged in 23 rows – enough space to transport 864 million bananas. The Triple-E is constructed from 425 pre-fabricated segments, making up 21 giant “megablock” cross sections. Most of the 955,250 litres of paint used on each ship is in the form of an anti- corrosive epoxy, pre-applied to each block. Finally, a polyurethane topcoat of the proprietary Maersk brand colour, “Hardtop AS-Blue 504”, is sprayed on.

Twenty Triple-E class container ships have been commissioned by Danish shipping company Maersk Lines for delivery by 2015. The ships are being built at the Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering factory in the South Korean port of Opko. The shipyard, about an hour from Busan in the south of the country, employs about 46,000 people, and "could reasonably be described as the worlds biggest Legoland," writes Wiper. "Smiling workers cycle around the huge shipyard as massive, abstractly over proportioned chunks of ships are craned around and set into place." The Triple E is just one small part of the output of the shipyard, as around 100 other vessels including oil rigs are in various stages of completion at the any time.” The vessels will serve ports along the northern-Europe-to-Asia route, many of which have had to expand to cope with the ships’ size. “You don’t feel like you’re inside a boat, it’s more like a cathedral,” Wiper says. “Imagine this space being full of consumer goods, and think about how many there are on just one ship. Then think about how many are sailing round the world every day. It’s like trying to think about infinity.”"

Power Plants Seek to Extend Life of Nuclear Reactors for Decades

mdsolar (1045926) writes | 7 hours ago

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mdsolar (1045926) writes "The prospects for building new nuclear reactors may be sharply limited, but the owners of seven old ones, in Pennsylvania, Virginia and South Carolina, are preparing to ask for permission to run them until they are 80 years old.

Nuclear proponents say that extending plants’ lifetimes is more economical — and a better way to hold down carbon dioxide emissions — than building new plants, although it will require extensive monitoring of steel, concrete, cable insulation and other components. But the idea is striking even to some members of the nuclear establishment.

At a meeting of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in May, George Apostolakis, a risk expert who was then one of the five commissioners, pointed out that if operation were allowed until age 80, some reactors would be using designs substantially older than that.

“I don’t know how we would explain to the public that these designs, 90-year-old designs, 100-year-old designs, are still safe to operate,” he said. “Don’t we need more convincing arguments than just ‘We’re managing aging effects’?”"

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'Namifying' Continues Unabated

netbuzz (955038) writes | 7 hours ago

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netbuzz (955038) writes "Someone has actually kept count of the number of startups that have chosen to “namify” their company’s moniker by slapping an “ify” at the end of an ordinary word, a practice made most famous by Spotify. The count: 337 since 2007 and 73 so far this year. “I don't know how aware founders are of this pattern or how it's been ridiculed,” says Chris Johnson, the Seattle-based branding consultant doing the counting."
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Copulation happened in Scotland, 385 million years ago!

Taco Cowboy (5327) writes | 8 hours ago

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Taco Cowboy (5327) writes "Boffins are claiming that they have found the evidence of animals equipped with "copulation tools" as far back as 385 million years ago

An international team of researchers says a fish called Microbrachius dicki is the first-known animal to stop reproducing by spawning and instead mate by having sex. The primitive bony fish, which was about 8cm long, lived in ancient lakes about 385 million years ago in what is now Scotland

Lead author Prof John Long, from Flinders University in Australia, said: "We have defined the very point in evolution where the origin of internal fertilisation in all animals began"

Prof Long added that the discovery was made as he was looking through a box of ancient fish fossils. He noticed that one of the M. dicki specimens had an odd L-shaped appendage

Further investigation revealed that this was the male fish's genitals. "The male has large bony claspers. These are the grooves that they use to transfer sperm into the female" explained Prof Long. Microbrachius dicki fossils are common — but nobody noticed the sexual organs until now. The female fish, on the other hand, had a small bony structure at their rear that locked the male organ into place

Constrained by their anatomy, the fish probably had to mate side by side."They couldn't have done it in a 'missionary position'" said Prof Long. "The very first act of copulation was done sideways, square-dance style ""

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