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This Math Explains Why The Next iPhone Will Launch September 12

redletterdave (2493036) writes | 2 minutes ago

0

redletterdave (2493036) writes "In 2012, Apple introduced iOS 6 on June 11, and released the mobile operating system on Wednesday, Sept. 19 — exactly 100 days after its unveiling. The iPhone 5 launched two days later on Friday, Sept. 21. Last year, Apple unveiled iOS 7 on June 10, and released it on Sept. 18 — again, a Wednesday, and again, exactly 100 days after the unveiling. The iPhone 5S and 5C launched two days later on Friday, Sept. 20. This year, Apple unveiled iOS 8 on June 2. If the company wants to go 3-for-3 on its 100-day window between the public unveiling and launch dates, we may see iOS 8 launch on Wednesday, Sept. 10, which is, you guessed it, 100 days after it was unveiled at WWDC. And if Apple releases the new iPhone two days after iOS 8, as it’s done in the past, we may see the iPhone 6 release that Friday, Sept. 12."
Link to Original Source

"Tor-breaking" talk cancelled from Black Hat

jehan60188 (2535020) writes | 4 minutes ago

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jehan60188 (2535020) writes "A proposed talk by two Carnegie Mellon University researchers demonstrating how to de-anonymise Tor users on a budget of US$3,000 has been axed from the Black Hat USA 2014 conference in Las Vegas next month.

The talk, 'You don’t have to be the NSA to Break Tor: Deanonymizing Users on a Budget' by speakers, Alexander Volynkin and Michael McCord, from Carnegie Mellon University's Computer Emergency Response Team, had reportedly been highly anticipated by punters.

However, the talk was scrapped from the program because it had not been approved by the legal counsel with the university's Software Engineering Institute, according to a statement on the Black Hat website this week.

"Late last week, we were informed by the legal counsel for the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) and Carnegie Mellon University that: 'Unfortunately, Mr. Volynkin will not be able to speak at the conference since the materials that he would be speaking about have not yet been approved by CMU/SEI for public release'," the statement said."

Link to Original Source

Microsoft Is Testing Developer Biometrics To Predict Software Bugs

rjmarvin (3001897) writes | 7 minutes ago

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rjmarvin (3001897) writes "Microsoft Research is testing a new method for catching errors and bugs in while developers code: biometrics
http://sdtimes.com/sd-times-bl.... By measuring a developer's eye movements, physical and mental characteristics as they code, the researchers measured alertness and stress levels to predict when a programmer will make a coding error. In a paper entitled "Using Psycho-Physiological Measures to Assess Task Difficulty in Software Development" http://research.microsoft.com/..., the researchers summarized their study of 15 developers where they strapped an eye tracker, an electrodermal sensor and an EEG sensor to developers as they programmed various tasks. The study found that biometrics predicted task difficulty for a new developer 64.99% of the time. For a new development task, the researchers found biometrics to be 84.38% accurate. The researchers did not, however, comment on the invasiveness of biometric sensors to developers."

Snowden's Favourite OS Tails Has Zero-Day Vulnerabilities Lurking Inside

I Ate A Candle (3762149) writes | 19 minutes ago

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I Ate A Candle (3762149) writes "Tails OS, the Tor-reliant privacy-focused operating system made famous by Edward Snowden, contains a number of zero-day vulnerabilities that could be used to take control of the OS and execute code remotely. At least that's according to zero-day exploit seller Exodus Intelligence, which counts DARPA amongst its customer base. The company plans to tell the Tails team about the issues “in due time”, said Aaron Portnoy, co-founder and vice president of Exodus, but it isn’t giving any information on a disclosure timeline. This means users of Tails are in danger of being de-anonymised. Even version 1.1, which hit public release today (22 July 2014), is affected. Snowden famously used Tails to manage the NSA files. The OS can be held on a USB stick and leaves no trace once removed from the drive. It uses the Tor network to avoid identification of the user, but such protections may be undone by the zero-day exploits Exodus holds."

Morgan Freeman on Mars

mcgrew (92797) writes | 20 minutes ago

User Journal 0

As I was going through Google News this morning I ran across an item about actor Morgan Freeman talking to a couple of astronauts on the ISS at a round table discussion at JPL before an audience of what looked like two or three hundred people, all of whom were JPL employees.

He was there with the producer of his show on the Science Channel Through the Wormhole and with its writer, a physicist.

What You Must Know About the Products

morganjlbv (3609555) writes | about half an hour ago

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morganjlbv (3609555) writes "Be as detailed as possible when advertising a product. Studies show that profuse explanations are needed by substantial percentages of the citizenry about the advantages of these products they may be thinking of buying to be able to be convinced. If customers truly consider the marketing, they'll be much more willing to buy the product. Researchers have found that many people will trust a web site with several paragraphs of info about a product over a website that's very succinct."
Link to Original Source

Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases TAILS with zero-day flaws alert

Anonymous Coward writes | 39 minutes ago

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An anonymous reader writes ""We're happy to see that TAILS 1.1 is being released tomorrow. Our multiple RCE/de-anonymization zero-days are still effective."

via @ExodusIntel: https://twitter.com/ExodusInte...

#$%#

"Exploit Dealer: Snowden's Favourite OS Tails Has Zero-Day Vulnerabilities Lurking Inside"

Thomas Brewster | Security | 7/21/2014 @ 2:14PM

http://www.forbes.com/sites/th...

#$%#

"The flaws work on the latest version of Tails and allow for the ability to exploit a targeted user, both for de-anonymisation and remote code execution," said Loc Nguyen a researcher at Exodus. Remote code execution means a hacker can do almost anything they want to the victimâ(TM)s system, such as installing malware or siphoning off files.

"Considering that the purpose of Tails is to provide a secure non-attributable platform for communications, users are verifiably at-risk due to these flaws. For the Tails platform, privacy is contingent on maintaining anonymity and ensuring their actions and communications are not attributable. Thus, any violation of those foundational pillars should be considering highly critical," added Nguyen. This affects every user of Tails, who should all "diversify security platforms so as not to put all your eggs in one basket", he added.

All users, including Snowden, should be wary of using Tails with a false sense of security, though itâ(TM)s still more likely to protect anonymity than Windows. Exodus sells to private and public businesses hoping to use the findings for either offensive or defensive means. Those unconcerned about governments targeting their systems might not be concerned about the Tails zero-days. Others will likely be anxious one of their trusted tools to avoid government hackers contains vulnerabilities that could be exploited to spy on any user of the OS."

#$%#

Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS

By Iain Thomson | 21 Jul 2014

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2..."

Open-Source Blu-Ray Library Now Supports BD-J Java

Anonymous Coward writes | 1 hour ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Updates to the open-source libbluray, libaacs, and libbdplus libraries have improved the open-source Blu-ray disc support to now enable the Blu-ray Java interactivity layer (BD-J). The Blu-ray Java code is in turn executed by OpenJDK or the Oracle JDK and is working well enough to play a Blu-ray disc on the Raspberry Pi when paired with the VLC media player."
Link to Original Source

AirMagnet Wi-Fi security tool takes aim at drones

alphadogg (971356) writes | 2 hours ago

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alphadogg (971356) writes "In its quest to help enterprises seek out and neutralize all threats to their Wi-Fi networks, AirMagnet is now looking to the skies. In a free software update to its AirMagnet Enterprise product last week, the Wi-Fi security division of Fluke Networks added code specifically crafted to detect the Parrot AR Drone, a popular unmanned aerial vehicle that costs a few hundred dollars and can be controlled using a smartphone or tablet. Drones themselves don’t pose any special threat to Wi-Fi networks, and AirMagnet isn’t issuing air pistols to its customers to shoot them down. The reason the craft are dangerous is that they can be modified to act as rogue access points and sent into range of a victim’s wireless network, potentially breaking into a network to steal data."
Link to Original Source

Black Hat presentation on TOR suddenly cancelled

alphadogg (971356) writes | 2 hours ago

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alphadogg (971356) writes "A presentation on a low-budget method to unmask users of a popular online privacy tool, TOR, will no longer go ahead at the Black Hat security conference early next month. The talk was nixed by the legal counsel with Carnegie Mellon’s Software Engineering Institute after a finding that materials from researcher Alexander Volynkin were not approved for public release, according to a notice on the conference’s website. https://www.blackhat.com/lates... Volynkin, a research scientist with the university’s Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) was due to give a talk entitled “You Don’t Have to be the NSA to Break Tor: Deanonymizing Users on a Budget” at the conference, which take places Aug. 6-7 in Last Vegas."
Link to Original Source

NVIDIA Launches SHIELD Tablet Powered By Tegra K1 And SHIELD Wireless Controller

MojoKid (1002251) writes | 2 hours ago

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MojoKid (1002251) writes "NVIDIA just officially announced the SHIELD Tablet (powered by their Tegra K1 SoC) and SHIELD wireless controller. As the SHIELD branding implies, the new SHIELD tablet and wireless controller builds upon the previously-released, Android-based SHIELD portable to bring a gaming-oriented tablet to consumers. The SHIELD Tablet and wireless controller are somewhat of mashup of the SHIELD portable and the Tegra Note 7, but featuring updated technology and better build materials. You could think of the SHIELD Tablet and wireless controller as an upgraded SHIELD portable gaming device, with the screen de-coupled from the controller. The device features NVIDIA's Tegra K1 SoC, paired to 2GB of RAM and an 8", full-HD IPS display, with a native resolution of 1920x1200. There are also a pair of 5MP cameras on the SHIELD Tablet (front and rear), 802.11a/b/g/n 2x2 MIMO WiFi configuration, GPS, a 9-axis motion sensor, and Bluetooth 4.0 LE. In addition to the WiFi-only version (which features 16GB of internal storage), NVIDIA has a 32GB version coming with LTE connectivity as well. NVIDIA will begin taking pre-orders for the SHIELD Tablet and wireless controller immediately."
Link to Original Source

New spongelike material for effective Solar steam generation

rtoz (2530056) writes | 3 hours ago

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rtoz (2530056) writes "Researchers at MIT have developed a new spongelike material structure which can use 85% of incoming solar energy for converting water into steam.

This spongelike structure has a layer of graphite flakes and an underlying carbon foam. This structure has many small pores.

It can float on the water, and it will act as an insulator for preventing heat from escaping to the underlying liquid.

As sunlight hits the structure, it creates a hotspot in the graphite layer, generating a pressure gradient that draws water up through the carbon foam. As water seeps into the graphite layer, the heat concentrated in the graphite turns the water into steam. This structure works much like a sponge.

This new material is able to use 85 percent of incoming solar energy for converting water into steam. It is a significant improvement over recent approaches to solar-powered steam generation. And, this setup loses very little heat in the process, and can produce steam at relatively low solar intensity. i-e if scaled up, this setup will not require complex, costly systems to highly concentrate sunlight."

Google May Bring Wi-Fi To New York City Pay Phones

itwbennett (1594911) writes | 3 hours ago

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itwbennett (1594911) writes "Google was among 60 entities that attended a meeting on May 12 to discuss a project to replace or supplement as many as 10,000 pay phones around the city, turning the relics of the past into 'communication points' of the future with free Wi-Fi and cellphone charging. The list came to light in a Bloomberg News report on Monday. Other participants included Samsung, IBM, Cisco Systems, Verizon Wireless, Cablevision and Time Warner Cable."
Link to Original Source

Brits ignore government's parental-control broadband filters

nk497 (1345219) writes | 4 hours ago

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nk497 (1345219) writes "Broadband customers are overwhelmingly choosing not to use parental-control systems foisted on ISPs by the government — with takeup in the single-digits for three of the four major broadband providers. Last year, the government pushed ISPs to roll out network-level filters, forcing new customers to make an "active" decision about whether they want to use them or not. Only 5% of new BT customers signed up, 8% opted in for Sky and 4% for Virgin Media. TalkTalk rolled out a parental-control system two years before the government required it and has a much better takeup, with 36% of customers signing up for it. The report, from regulator Ofcom, didn't bother to judge if the filters actually work, however."
Link to Original Source

How bad UI complicated the KAL007 flight crisis 31 years ago

Crayon Kid (700279) writes | 4 hours ago

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Crayon Kid (700279) writes "31 years ago, on September 1, 1983, Korean Airlines flight 007 (KAL007) was shot down by a Soviet fighter, an incident which would go on to develop into one of the most tense moments of the Cold War.

On that morning, 23 year old John C. Beck, while working in the US Embassy in Tokyo, inadvertedly hit the wrong key and caused the loss of all ongoing work on a report on the incident being prepared by diplomats and translators for President Reagan, a fact which delayed the official statement from the US administration and caused several unfortunate side effects.

[...] I highlighted her workstation and hit the F6 key to reset. But my screen went temporarily black and then seemed to be starting again. I realized that I had mistakenly hit F7 and reset all the workstations in the embassy.

[...] I, naturally, felt terrible and was, appropriately, fired.

It was only weeks later that I began to comprehend the effects of this single keystroke mistake.

He seems to have taken this incident in stride and accepted the consequences. But it doesn't change the fact that the user interface design seems horrid: it made it possible to destroy the work in progress on the entire network with a single keystroke, without even a confirmation, and furthermore placed that key right next to one used much more often and with less severe effects.

It would be very interesting to see if this design was simply bad or if it was intentional – if for instance they wanted to be able to destroy everything at the touch of a button in case of a security emergency."

Link to Original Source

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