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The Pirate Bay To Stop Serving Torrent Files

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the magnets-how-do-they-work dept.

Piracy 377

An anonymous reader tips news that The Pirate Bay is making a move away from .torrent files in favor of 'magnet links.' On Thursday the site made magnet links the default, and TorrentFreak reports that they'll stop serving .torrent files altogether in about a month. "The announcement is bound to lead to confusion and uncertainty among many torrent users, but in reality very little will change for the average Pirate Bay visitor. Users will still be able to download files, but these will now be started through a magnet link instead of a .torrent file. The Pirate Bay team told TorrentFreak that one of the advantages of the transition to a 'magnet site' is that it requires relatively little bandwidth to host a proxy. This is topical, since this week courts in both Finland and the Netherlands ordered local Internet providers to block the torrent site. Perhaps even better, without the torrent files everyone can soon host a full copy of The Pirate Bay on a USB thumb drive, which may come in handy in the future."

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For what (-1, Flamebait)

bonch (38532) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703404)

Perhaps even better, without the torrent files everyone can soon host a full copy of The Pirate Bay on a USB thumb drive, which may come in handy in the future.

Come in handy for what? Piracy?

Why is that good?

Re:For what (5, Interesting)

luther349 (645380) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703422)

more like isp level blocking. they will just make tons of mirrors of the site everywhere. kinda like how i said with sopa etc it does not matter what law you pass or how many sites you take down 50 more take its place.

Re:For what (5, Insightful)

Zemran (3101) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703548)

You are writing in the future tense but this is already happening... I use http://malaysiabay.org/ [malaysiabay.org] because it is nearer to me and therefore quicker...

If they take that down I am sure that a copy will be up within hours... As usual the only people that will really benefit from all this are the lawyers.

Re:For what (5, Insightful)

luther349 (645380) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703582)

rember the http warez of the old they would try taking down the sites and they would be back up in hrs with 10 new mirrors. there was even a tool that would generate accounts on every free hoster and upload your site all with a click. went threw this in the 90s and did just fine the only reason it quit was stuff like bittorrent took the need for it away. its the same game over again and the pirates know how to win.

Re:For what (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703432)

What do you think?
Mirrors!

Re:For what (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703454)

Eh I'm kinda torn on this. I don't support piracy at all, but I laughed when I read how magnet links worked and realized that all the protect ip sopa stuff has no good way of protecting against this. It would be good if they realized that there was nothing they could do (at least not as far as blocking sites goes), and therefore did nothing.

Re:For what (3, Insightful)

TerranFury (726743) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703490)

there was nothing they could do (at least not as far as blocking sites goes),

...but it looks like joining the swarm, logging IPs, and writing John Doe lawsuits is still just as must an option...

Re:For what (1)

luther349 (645380) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703532)

acully they have ended that being they started losing cases. why they are bribe heavy on passing laws that can never be enforced.

Re:For what (-1, Troll)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703642)

You said:

I don't support piracy at all,

Fuck off, limpwrist. Mommy has a teet for you to suckle.

Re:For what (5, Informative)

Gideon Wells (1412675) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703466)

Well, I don't know to be honest. I could pull numerous possible reasons out of my nether regions:
1) Smaller bandwidth footprint due to the size. Each small file adds up. Making the files smaller helps a lot. If the Pirate Bay has to resort to another ISP with lower quality bandwidth.

2) If the entirety of Pirate Bay can be hosted on a thumb drive then it is hard to simply nuke the Pirate Bay. Just give a few trusted people thumb drive copies as backups.

3) If the Pirate Bay gets torched, you can have many clones pop up in no time. You could do 1A with bigger storage mediums, but if the site is fitable on a thumb drive then it is small enough to get these clones uploaded quicker.

Re:For what (-1, Redundant)

kiwimate (458274) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703534)

So like Bonch said:

Come in handy for what? Piracy?

Why is that good?

Yes, for piracy.

Why is that good?

Re:For what (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703578)

Because sometimes there are things it is useful to pirate. Such as losing a Windows install CD, or ending up with a film that is so full of DRM you cannot watch it in the way you want so you download a copy that you can. Legal consumers circumventing their asinine protections are just as much frequenters of TPB as those who just download movies and TV shows every day compulsively.

Re:For what (1)

luther349 (645380) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703614)

yea this isn't just bought pirate bay. it just happens to be the biggest target you really think if you let them win they would stop there. there next move will to be to for after any site that has any sort of media they own fair use or not so say good buy to youtube facebook twitter google etc why because they all link to media. these people are not really after pirates they have been around since the birth of man that's how we learn and invent. its bought keeping there dead business alive and the only way to do that is to cripple the internet.

Re:For what (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703630)

Wow, that was badly written, poorly punctuated, verging on incoherent, and flat out incorrect. I remember when reading Slashdot at least gave you some cogent debates, even if you disagreed with people.

Re:For what (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703618)

Because sometimes there are things it is useful to pirate. Such as losing a Windows install CD, or ending up with a film that is so full of DRM you cannot watch it in the way you want so you download a copy that you can. Legal consumers circumventing their asinine protections are just as much frequenters of TPB as those who just download movies and TV shows every day compulsively.

So in other words, "because I really really really REALLY want it RIGHT NOW and for free, therefore stfu and give me it RIGHT NOW and for free, QED". Gotcha.

Re:For what (5, Interesting)

danbeck (5706) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703782)

Yeah, pretty much. e.g. I own Diablo II. A few weeks ago I looked around for my CDs, but was having trouble finding them. My only options were to pay for it twice, pirate it or to give up. I picked pirate... you tell me why that's morally wrong.

Hint: because the government said so isn't a real answer

Re:For what (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703818)

So because you're an idiot that can't keep track of anything you stoop to theft. Got it.

Re:For what (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703974)

Or he could've lost the CD-keys and since you need a valid one to do even Single Player...he'd have to either keygen or crack the game (or buy a CD-key), which are still bad in the eyes of Blizzard-Activision.

Of course, if he did the smart thing and kept a personal-use ISO on his hard drive of the disc he made a copy of himself, he'd still be seen as a criminal...by somebody, anyway.

Re:For what (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703938)

The worst part of this:

if you registered your cd key with your battle.net account, you can download it for free from blizzard.

Re:For what (2)

Fjandr (66656) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703970)

I've had to do that for a number of OEM reinstall CDs as well. Manufacturers don't send them, or they set it up so they must be created by the customer. Guess what, most people don't have a clue, so when you have to re-image a hosed system your options are to purchase the media (even though you already have the rights to what's held on the media) and wait for shipping or torrent an OEM reinstall disk.

If I were downloading them to create pirate installations, I'd just download a VLK image and be done with it, so that's not a valid rebuttal.

Re:For what (-1, Flamebait)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703634)

So like Bonch said:

Filthy suckpuppet, I will compile and identify you all. Fuck off, shill.

Re:For what (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703684)

Why is that good?

Because the shows I download legally and pay for are not available in my country with the subtitles that I need to understand them. If the Powers That Be would provide those, I wouldn't need to download a copy from the Pirate Bay. As it is, I buy the download legally off iTunes, because I have a vain hope that some of the money I pay might make it to the artists responsible for the show rather than the accountants who fleece them, and then I download the torrent off the Pirate Bay so that I can understand what I watched.

TPB is useful for filling in the gaps that iTunes and the like leave open. The quality and service that the pirates provide are better than what the authorized distributors provide.

Plus, I can rest assured that my pirated copy will work on any device I may happen to purchase and at any time; I don't have to worry about region locking, permissions servers being taken offline (anyone remember PlaysForSure?), or other arbitrary and unnecessary constraints placed on my purchases. So long as standards like AVI or DIVX or H264 can be read, I'm good to go; there's no threat to the longevity of my purchases.

So, using TPB to provide open standards-based backups that are free of useless and arbitrary impediments that add no value to me ensures that I'm no longer placed at the whim and caprice of the content industry. I give them money (I legally download a copy via iTunes) and in turn receive the goods without any restrictions (I download a copy via the Pirate Bay).

That's why the Pirate Bay is good.

Re:For what (4, Interesting)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703832)

Why is that good?

Because infringing copyright is what will preserve the last few generations of copyrighted material whose owners have/will disappear and leave them orphaned?
Because not making copyrighted content available across large parts of the world does nothing to promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts?
Because 120 years of copyright is not what most of us would call a limited time?

Copyright infringement has been around since we started carving into clay tablets.
It's not going away.

Re:For what (4, Funny)

Zemran (3101) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703644)

Will I have to go to Pirate Bay to get a copy of Pirate Bay for my thumb drive or will I go to a thumb drive copy for the latest version :-D

Re:For what (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703546)

Why isn't it?

More pedantically, piracy is what we call it when someone forcibly boards your vessel and steals your real property.

I think you've convinced me to (a) start doing some pro-copyright trolling, and (b) start contributing to the Pirate Party.

Re:For what (4, Interesting)

grahamsaa (1287732) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703726)

Bonch is a known troll. Slashdot -- feature request: allow filtering based on username/UID. For the time being, Bonch is the only user who posts things that I'm consistently not interested in reading, and, well, I've been active here for years, but there could eventually be someone else that's worth ignoring completely. Sure, you can call this flamebait if you like, but I've got karma to burn and I know I'm not the only person who thinks that bonch is best left alone and ignored.

Re:For what (5, Informative)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703892)

Slashdot -- feature request: allow filtering based on username/UID.

That feature has existed for the longest time as the Friends/Foes" list.
Click on a user's name, then choose "Friend this user"
You'll get a menu offering you three choices:
Friend
Neutral

Foe

It's three clicks, assuming you already have the friends/foes modifiers set.
If you don't... go into your comments preferences
https://slashdot.org/users.pl?op=editcomm [slashdot.org]
and set Foes to whatever negative modifier you want.
-6 means you'll never see their posts unless you browse in the gutter.

While you're in there, consider changing your default posting method to Plain Old Text.
Links will automagically get urlified and you'll stop posting blocks of text, because your line breaks will carry over
/unless you try to use a forward slash at the beginning of a line
//you can still use html with POT

Re:For what (2)

metrix007 (200091) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703876)

Bonch, you're kind of an idiot when it comes to piracy. Stop letting your emotions cloud things and actually think things through for a moment.

Piracy has little or no cost to content owners. A potential sale is not a lost sale. They still make mad money. People who can't afford it or wouldn't otherwise pay for it still getting access is not a bad thing, as they they give back to the community. Piracy results in a net benefit, rather than a net loss.

Seriously kiddo, think about it.

Re:For what (1)

metrix007 (200091) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703894)

Bonch, you're kind of an idiot when it comes to piracy. Stop letting your emotions cloud things and actually think things through for a moment.

Piracy has little or no cost to content owners. A potential sale is not a lost sale. They still make mad money. People who can't afford it or wouldn't otherwise pay for it still getting access is not a bad thing, as they they give back to the community. Piracy results in a net benefit, rather than a net loss.

Seriously kiddo, think about it.

Why doesn't slashdot let me paragraph my first...paragraph?

Re:For what (1)

epyT-R (613989) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703946)

so that maybe young people can learn how to use software they'll encounter later in their professional lives..you know, kinda like what you did in the 80s as a kid (based on your low UID).

I don't like magnetic links (2, Interesting)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703438)

The problem is site owners use them to place ads next to real links and malware laced ads come up as magnetic links as well. You can't tell what you are downloading unless you pay close attention.

Re:I don't like magnetic links (3, Funny)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703596)

Yes. anything to avoid paying close attention to what we're doing.

Re:I don't like magnetic links (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703714)

Yes. anything to avoid paying close attention to what we're doing.

In a totally platonic kind of (agape) way, I love you.

Welcome to the web (4, Insightful)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703672)

Look before you leap. Hover before you click.

i weep, truly, weep for you (1, Flamebait)

decora (1710862) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703752)

life must be very hard indeed, if, in the course of downloading films and music without paying the creators, you accidentally have to watch an advertisement. how can you survive? what gives you hope? how do you wake up in the morning and face each day? knowing that somewhere out there, there might be ads, RIGHT NEXT to your magnet links, just waiting for you to accidentally click the wrong thing.

surely there is something we, as Americans, can do about this horrible problem. maybe if we all wrote our congressmen...

Remote Usage? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703440)

So, how is this going to work if you don't use your local machine for torrents? Personally, I have a low-power computer for that task that I can leave on overnight while I put my power-hungry desktop to sleep. It's worked well up until now, since I can just save torrent files into a monitored folder over the network, but how are things going to work with magnet links? Will I now have to use remote desktop to my other machine, pull up TPB, and click the link? Sounds pretty shitty to me (but hey, who can complain about "free"?)

Re:Remote Usage? (2)

satoshi1 (794000) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703488)

Research how your client uses magnet links.

Re:Remote Usage? (2)

luther349 (645380) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703494)

most client support magnet links anyways.

Re:Remote Usage? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703594)

I know my client supports magnet links. That's not the issue.

Here is how I currently handle torrents:

1) On my main computer, click link to download .torrent file.
2) For save location, select monitored folder on secondary computer, save the file there.
3) Torrent client on secondary computer spots new .torrent file, loads it.

The problem here is that a magnet link is just that--a link--and not a file. As such, I'm wondering if there's a way to pass the magnet link to another computer as I was previously doing with torrent files, but it wouldn't appear that it is possible. As I see it, I would now have to do something more like this:

1) Find the torrent download page, copy URL.
2) Open up remote desktop connection to secondary computer.
3) Open browser on secondary computer and paste URL.
4) Click on the magnet link and have it passed to the torrent client.

Even then, this isn't an ideal situation. Like many others, I have monthly bandwidth restrictions. Frequently, in order to stay well shy of this limit, if I see a torrent I want, but can't download it at the time, I would save the .torrent file into another directory where I could load it a short while later, without having to try to hunt down the specific torrent again.

I know, I'm just set in my ways and being picky, but I REALLY like the setup I have now. So far, I see no good alternative to this system.

Re:Remote Usage? (2)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703836)

1. Install rtorrent
2. Use bash script from here [rakshasa.no] .
3. Copy .torrent files to watch folder

Re:Remote Usage? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703508)

http://forums.mydigitallife.info/threads/18134-Magnet-Links-to-.trottent?s=9148f653036ebe8033c11191a274a500&p=260817&viewfull=1#post260817

Re:Remote Usage? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703542)

That's a start, but it's not much better of a solution than just copying the URL and connecting through remote desktop. My reservations for using the method you linked to would be privacy. That is, opening the magnet on my primary computer--which doesn't have the strict IP blocking settings of the remote downloading computer--would expose me to everyone in the swarm.

Looks like I'm just going to have to put up with the extra aggravation of remote connections for every magnet link. :-(

Thanks, though, for the alternative.

Re:Remote Usage? (4, Informative)

grantek (979387) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703538)

If you can get a .torrent file onto a remote downloading host you can get a text file with the magnet link there.

Alternatively, you can use a client-server torrent client (like deluge), where the GUI appears on your workstation but the downloading happens on the remote system.

Re:Remote Usage? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703552)

Perhaps, stop pirating stuff and realize that if you want something you either pay the asking price or do without? You know, be honest and show some principles?

but hey, who can complain about "free"?

Gee, I don't know - how about all the people you're stealing from? (Cue the hordes of arguments about "it's not stealing, it's copyright infringement". Semantic nonsense designed to avoid the real issue.)

Re:Remote Usage? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703646)

And this is why discussions on copyright never amount to anything.

On one side, you have people who insist that their opponents are evil thieves and that what they are doing is objectively wrong.
On the other side, you have people who insist that the other side is composed of corporate shills and that they are objectively wrong.

And these two types of people seem to be the ones with the loudest voices.

Re:Remote Usage? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703676)

Even if you're right in your assumptions, that doesn't change the fact that you're an assumptive asshole who should hold his tongue unless he has solid proof to the contrary.

I might feel more bad about such activities if not for the fact that those poor movie studios and whatnot are continuing to post record profits, and how they try to make way more money off prosecuting pirates than they'd ever legitimately make if piracy didn't exist.

It's a really sad state of affairs when they can make tens of thousands of times the cost of an album off you by prosecuting you for piracy than they can if you just walked into a store and outright shoplifted it--without even needing proper evidence that you actually supplied the files to that many people. Not to mention they try to double-dip by suing the uploader, suing all the downloaders, suing the site that hosted the files, suing ISPs, etc. The way they scam the system is just as bad (if not worse) than all the alleged piracy against these companies' IP.

maybe you just have shitty taste in art? (1, Insightful)

decora (1710862) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703770)

honestly, do you really need to pirate another Creed album or the latest transformers movie? I mean, jesus christ, why dont you read a fucking book or something?

Re:maybe you just have shitty taste in art? (4, Informative)

bipbop (1144919) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703800)

People torrent those, too!

Re:Remote Usage? (0)

thunderclap (972782) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703720)

Perhaps, stop pirating stuff and realize that if you want something you either pay the asking price or do without? You know, be honest and show some principles?

hmm, what about the stuff you can't pay for? Like the fact that Hulu and YouTube have location restrictions. As does Ten in Australia and BBC in the UK. How do I if I am not in those countries do that. Why should the media companies decide when a program should be shown if it is ever shown outside its host country. If its paid for by the commercials broadcast in the host country then its paid for. Your typical narrow-minded brainwashing is the reason why SOPA is even being discussed in Congress.

am I missing something? (1)

Presto Vivace (882157) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703442)

Is this a death knell for bit torrent?

Re:am I missing something? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703504)

Torrents are peer-to-peer. It seems to me that what they're saying is that torrent file hosting (The Pirate Bay, itself) may become a distributed service.

Re:am I missing something? (-1, Flamebait)

Kenja (541830) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703562)

Nope. But the Pirate Bay will see a sharp decline in use. I know I for one cant be bothered with magnet links. If I cant get the torrent as a string I'm not really interested in going through another layer of abstraction.

Re:am I missing something? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703566)

A hash is a string. What's the difference? You click a download link, your BT client launches and you download the file. Nothing changes other than the initial connection to get the information about the file from the magnet hash.

Re:am I missing something? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703660)

I don't see the problem either. If anything, magnet links are even quicker! I started using them a while ago when i noticed the option and remembered that uTorrent had a setting to associate itself with magnet links, so i clicked one, and suddenly i had to do several less steps ( save, go to save location, open torrent, add it to client ).

Very convenient.

Re:am I missing something? (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703764)

As copyright holders bring more pressure on Peer-To-Peer sites, they get progressively more decentralized.
Relying on hashes instead of torrent files is just the next step in bittorrent's evolution.
Instead of offering up files, The Pirate Bay will be offering up links, just like Google.
And except in certain countries, there's nothing illegal about making available links.

Ideally we'd all be using something completely decentralized like gnutella/gnutella2,
but the average user's desire/need for a curated and verified list of files seems to be stubborn.

Which begs the question... (5, Informative)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703456)

What the hell is a Magnet URI?

You could read Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] but the short answer is that it's a file hash, meaning there's no centralized server; just a description of the file that can be downloaded automatically from various decentralized file sharing networks.

Re:Which begs the question... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703600)

It certainly RAISES the question, yes.

However, with no question asked in the summary, I don't see how you could accuse anyone of begging the question.

Re:Which begs the question... (0, Flamebait)

GreyWolf3000 (468618) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703620)

Have you ever even kissed a girl?

Re:Which begs the question... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703822)

That's ad hominable!

Re:Which begs the question... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703922)

Have you ever even kissed a girl?

I think so.

Re:Which begs the question... (2)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703662)

Believe it or not, it is possible for a phrase to have multiple meanings. Begging the question, or circular reasoning, is one thing. Begging [for] the question is another. You, as a thinking human being, are capable of discerning which is meant from the context.

Re:Which begs the question... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703734)

Believe it or not, it is possible for a phrase to have multiple meanings. Begging the question, or circular reasoning, is one thing. Begging [for] the question is another. You, as a thinking human being, are capable of discerning which is meant from the context.

Just shut the fuck up you pathetic fat bastard. Yeah, I do know you're fat. You fat bastard. Why don't you as a human being think about not consuming so many fucking calories?

Re:Which begs the question... (0)

smi.james.th (1706780) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703792)

Why is it that someone who tries to encourage others to use idiomatic expressions correctly is so relentlessly flamed on this website? Slashdot readers are usually so civilised, after all...

Re:Which begs the question... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703878)

Why is it that someone who tries to encourage others to use idiomatic expressions correctly is so relentlessly flamed on this website?

Because of the niggers. It's their fault.

Slashdot readers are usually so civilised, after all...

Yes, except for the niggers. Their gangsta culture won't tolerate much civility.

Re:Which begs the question... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703848)

You are an idiot. And by that I mean a fine fellow. Please understand that it's possible for phrases to have more than one meaning, even when those meanings are nearly completely opposite. So please don't think I was calling you an idiot when I called you an idiot.

Re:Which begs the question... (2)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703978)

My only objection is that it breaks my workflow. I run uTorrent in a dedicated low power server and load torrents by dropping .torrent files into a network folder. Now I have to copy the link, open up a remote desktop connection, log in and paste the link into uTorrent.

Hopefully a Firefox addon will be forthcoming.

These work great with uTorrent Remote (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703458)

Magnet links are probably going to take over, I didn't learn about them until I tried uTorrent Remote with my iPhone... Only way I could easily tell my client what to download... Probably simplify things for everyone, including guys that use seedboxes or WHS or similar media implementations.

The ISP's will be asked to block interclient comm. (1)

mehrotra.akash (1539473) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703462)

Doesnt magnet require clients to communicate with each other using DHT?
Whats stopping the ISP's from blocking DHT itself, atleast this way they have to block individual sites
If everything went magnet they can wipe it all out by just blocking DHT

Re:The ISP's will be asked to block interclient co (1)

TerranFury (726743) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703470)

And doesn't widespread NAT hurt DHT a lot?

Re:The ISP's will be asked to block interclient co (1)

GuldKalle (1065310) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703554)

I don't think it hurts DHT more than it hurts Bittorrent in general.
So if you can use Bittorrent, you can use DHT.

Re:The ISP's will be asked to block interclient co (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703690)

Many NATs are "open cone" they allow all traffic in on a udp port after a single packet is sent out from one, plus UPnP.

Re:The ISP's will be asked to block interclient co (0)

luther349 (645380) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703518)

dht cant be block so easy its p2p much like old school file sharing is theirs no 1 server to block. they could try to port ban but then people would just change it.

Re:The ISP's will be asked to block interclient co (4, Informative)

duguk (589689) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703584)

Doesnt magnet require clients to communicate with each other using DHT? Whats stopping the ISP's from blocking DHT itself, atleast this way they have to block individual sites If everything went magnet they can wipe it all out by just blocking DHT

Simply put - no it doesn't need DHT.

Magnet URI scheme on Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] explains that a magnet link can contain anything from a standard URL, to P2P (DirectConnect, Gnutella, eDonkey), a list of keywords to search for, or a BitTorrent tracker (with DHT or with tracker URLs). They can contain a list of one - or many of these different sources too, and even include CRC and MD5.

Re:The ISP's will be asked to block interclient co (1)

GuldKalle (1065310) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703696)

they'd have to DPI every UCP packet on the network. Also, DHT is used for other things than BT. But yeah, it's possible.

Gee... (2)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703486)

Guess SOPA isn't gonna work so well now, is it?

Re:Gee... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703544)

Oh, it will work as intended alright. It won't stop piracy, but that is not what it's for.

Re:Gee... (2)

luther349 (645380) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703550)

sopa is a dead bill at least it seems to be going in that direction they even have started drafting sopa 2 aka open to take its palce. they have eve amended the dns crap in a attempt to get support.its all bs being the next bill will probably be even worse. no half letting half a bill pass so they can get it on the next half do not let sopa pass at all.

Re:Gee... (5, Insightful)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703678)

Depends what the goal is. If the goal is to stop piracy, no, it won't work and never would have. If the goal is for politicians to throw a bone to the content owners in exchange for big time donations, then I suspect it will work quite well.

Time for a Million Mirror March (1)

hawks5999 (588198) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703498)

Everyone who opposes SOPA should be able to mirror the site now. The ultimate protest is to have a Million Mirror March. MAKE them shut down the entire internet to stop signal.

Re:Time for a Million Mirror March (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703572)

MAKE them shut down the entire internet to stop signal.

Careful what you wish for.

My fear is one day the selfish cowards here on /. and elsewhere who pirate everything will look back on the freedoms they used to have on the internet and realize that they are the reason for its destruction.

And I will have a hollow victory in saying "told you so". Hollow, because you'll have ruined it for those of us who aren't cheap bastards. Thanks for nothing, parasites.

Re:Time for a Million Mirror March (2)

TheCouchPotatoFamine (628797) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703668)

well, that's either a moving statement on morality and the price of freedom from someone who stands on a precipice, or the nonsense of someone who doesn't know what will happen next, so afraid of the unknown they beg strangers to cease.. afraid of the dark so they want to legislate the sun stay up from now on.. It's your planet, you decide!

Re:Time for a Million Mirror March (2)

J'raxis (248192) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703982)

Damn all those people for actually exercising their freedoms! If you never actually used your freedoms, the government never would've taken them away!

Stop Serving Torrent Files (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703514)

Stop Serving Torrent Files, start serving watermelon. Since, you know, they happen to grow right there anyway.

Incidentally, that is the only place I've seen a bee with a polka-dotted knee.

Its Late, I'm Dumb, or Both (1)

paleo2002 (1079697) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703520)

I looked at the wiki linked in the summary but it wasn't what I'd call enlightening. Could someone explain (or direct me to an explanation) of magnet links vs. torrents? I'm assuming its a more secure system, but I'm curious how.

BTW, yes I know "Is your google broken?", "here let me google that for you", etc. But, sometimes its nice to get answers from sentient beings instead of an algorithm.

Re:Its Late, I'm Dumb, or Both (2)

luther349 (645380) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703556)

it uses hash tags and theirs no central server also the file name does not matter so stuff can be named anything. basically they cant be blocked,

Re:Its Late, I'm Dumb, or Both (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703700)

See? Now don't complain about getting a sentient reply with capitalisation, punctuation, grammatical and spelling errors.

Re:Its Late, I'm Dumb, or Both (0)

danbeck (5706) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703744)

I have no idea who you are talking to, but if you are complaining about luther349's pathetic example of the written English language, /AGREED.

Re:Its Late, I'm Dumb, or Both (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703730)

or found while digging through 10,000 spamware infected ad sites

whoopie its just like searching for wares on google

Re:Its Late, I'm Dumb, or Both (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703628)

Instead of downloading a torrent file, you feed a special url into the client which searches the DHT (p2p database of peers downloading torrents) for peers. Then when it connects to some peers it downloads the torrent from them. Its just as secure as downloading a torrent from the Pirate Bay.

Re:Its Late, I'm Dumb, or Both (5, Informative)

GuldKalle (1065310) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703664)

the .torrent files are hosted by the peers, instead of on piratebay. When you join the DHT network (by running a bittorrent client), you are assigned a number, based on your IP. In a similar manner, all torrent files are given a number based on a hash of their contents.
If you are given the number 5 and the next client on the network has the number 9, you must host the torrent files numbered 5-8 (if they exist). You can get those files from the client behind you, as he must have had them before you joined.
You must also know some of the other clients on the network. This is normally some of those close to you, and some of those furthest away from you (as in, you have the IP for client 505, assuming the network goes to 1000).
There are of course backup hosts for the files etc, but that's the general idea

Re:Its Late, I'm Dumb, or Both (1)

afabbro (33948) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703796)

the .torrent files are hosted by the peers, instead of on piratebay

So, I'm a big media company and I put up a peer with lots of juicy downloads, you connect and download, I sue you.

How is this better than plain old bit torrent?

Re:Its Late, I'm Dumb, or Both (2)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703868)

It's much harder to sue each user than to bring down a tracker, particularly if common sense continues to prevail [torrentfreak.com] .

Re:Its Late, I'm Dumb, or Both (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703952)

If "big media company" deliberately shares their own content then they are going to have a tough time showing to the court that they didn't want it shared. And if they share someone else's content, then they don't have standing to sue.

Re:Its Late, I'm Dumb, or Both (1)

Nos. (179609) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703666)

I've looked at them a bit, and from what I can tell... its more or less a link that does the same thing a torrent file does. It contains the infohash (unique identifier), file name, size of the file, trackers, etc

Re:Its Late, I'm Dumb, or Both (2)

shish (588640) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703682)

As I understand it, the magnet is effectively the hash of the .torrent file; given the magnet, a client will connect to the distributed database of .torrent files and download it from there, and then carry on as if it had downloaded the .torrent over HTTP. Like a meta-bittorrent, using P2P to take the load away from TPB's centralised servers :-P

soooo.. hash collisions? (2)

decora (1710862) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703778)

all of a sudden you download transformers 4, and find out that its really an old episode of The Waltons. what do you do then?

Re:soooo.. hash collisions? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703814)

Enjoy the show as it's guaranteed to be better than another movie with Shia LaBeouf.

Re:soooo.. hash collisions? (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#38703890)

Read parent's post again.

It's a hash of the .torrent file, not of the actual files being shared. You can make sure you there's no collision after downloading the .torrent file, which is only a couple of KiBs.

Fucking magnet links... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703794)

...how do they work?

Headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#38703994)

The title of the article is a bit sensational. It almost reads like TPB is shutting down completely. A better one could'a been "The Pirate Bay Switches To Magnet Links".
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