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China Bans iPad, MacBook Pro, Other Apple Products For Government Use

timothy posted about a month and a half ago | from the regulatory dept.

China 115

MojoKid (1002251) writes "China seems to be on a mission to isolate itself from the world, at least in terms of technology. After banning Windows 8 on government PCs and raiding several of Microsoft's offices in China as part of an anti-trust investigation, Chinese officials have now prohibited purchase of several Apple products for government use. The list of banned Apple products include the iPad, iPad Mini, MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, and half a dozen other items, all of which were left off of a final government procurement list distributed in July. This is a potentially big hit to Apple, which generated around 16 percent of its $37.4 billion in revenue last quarter from China. Apple saw its iPad sales jump 51 percent and Mac sales boosted 39 percent in China."

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Seriously can you blame them (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47617607)

Blame the NSA

Re:Seriously can you blame them (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47618089)

Not really. Apple products are domestic products in China.

Re: Seriously can you blame them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47618875)

Yeah the whole "California" thing is a sham. Reality is American workers are too expensive and lazy. Hence Apple is Chinese. Go China!

Re: Seriously can you blame them (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47619157)

Me Chinese, me play joke, me go pee pee in your coke!

Me American, me so smart, me no drink the pee pee part!

Re: Seriously can you blame them (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47619367)

If you're going to troll can you at least try? The point is to piss people off, not make them feel sorry for you.

Re:Seriously can you blame them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47619933)

Not really. Apple products are domestic products in China.

So that huge sucking sound was Apple pulling all of the manufacturing out of China within the next 18 months? Awesome.

Re:Seriously can you blame them (5, Insightful)

Skarjak (3492305) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618097)

Good point. How can anyone trust hardware and software coming from the states? Although when it comes to software, I'm sure that the NSA's people will be quite busy with trying to find security holes into whatever the Chinese decide to go with.

Re:Seriously can you blame them (2)

Tough Love (215404) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618439)

How can anyone trust hardware and software coming from the states?

How? If and only if that software is open source from bottom to top, including being able to build and install it with an open source toolchain.

Re:Seriously can you blame them (1)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618653)

Apple, designed in Israel, for the NSA with a California packaging, since Oct, 2011.

Hi Tim!

Re:Seriously can you blame them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47619691)

It is more likely to be

Apple, designed by NSA, with the help from Israel, with a California packaging

Re:Seriously can you blame them (1)

Skarjak (3492305) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618975)

Yes, I should have added "proprietary" in there. Although we should still be vigilant even with open source, it's very realistic I think that they might be trying to subtly add vulnerabilities to open source software.

Re:Seriously can you blame them (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about a month and a half ago | (#47620725)

The NSA uses hardware bugs, so going fully open source on software and firmware won't help.

Re:Seriously can you blame them (1)

Tough Love (215404) | about a month and a half ago | (#47620991)

The NSA uses hardware bugs, so going fully open source on software and firmware won't help.

That's a rather black and white claim. Which hardware bugs did you have in mind exactly, and what makes you think an open software stack won't help flush them out?

Re:Seriously can you blame them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47621207)

The kind that sit on BIOS? Or on monitor cables? Good luck flushing out something that sits inside your monitor cable and transmits the red channel out. (I guess you could just not use the red channel, but that was in 2008, maybe they use green now.. Anyone know if someone has made a joke program to do this?)

Re:Seriously can you blame them (1)

AaronW (33736) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618993)

Having seen plenty of code from Asia, I'll take code from the United States any day. The worst code I have ever dealt with all came from China and Taiwan. The worst code I saw came from this Chinese company: http://www.zdnet.com/hack-in-t... [zdnet.com]

Re:Seriously can you blame them (1)

currently_awake (1248758) | about a month and a half ago | (#47619259)

Doesn't Apple have all their stuff made in China? So it's just the software you're afraid of then. Still the saying is 'don't trust American companies!'

Re:Seriously can you blame them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47619729)

Foxconn does much of their hardware.

Re:Seriously can you blame them (0)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618179)

Regardless of the reason, you can't honestly call it "free trade" if one country's products are banned.

I'm not saying I'm blaming them. I don't. But whether NSA was responsible or not, it still affects trade. It's an effective tariff (or even worse than a tariff).

Re:Seriously can you blame them (4, Insightful)

rogoshen1 (2922505) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618193)

They aren't banning apple products; just not buying them for government work. It would be akin to federal/state/local governments saying that all government owned vehicles have to be made by a domestic supplier. (that does happen doesn't it?)

Re:Seriously can you blame them (5, Informative)

ewibble (1655195) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618251)

sort of the US banning Chinese products from government http://techonomy.com/2013/04/h... [techonomy.com]

Re:Seriously can you blame them (1)

sillybilly (668960) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618355)

We need to put up rotating cylinder space stations ASAP, before the paranoid people start throwing rocks at each other down here, and stuff. Microsoft and Apple are not gonna stop putting spying things into their stuff, cuz, that's just how they are, they can't help themselves, and then you get things like the Chinese gov't going all out paranoid, and arming themselves. I wonder if they'd have Stanislav Petrov's sitting at their nuclear ICBM early detection and launch triggering system. Sometimes it's the guy on the bottom like Stanislav, who calls the shots for the whole chain of command above him, because whatever he says, they take it as 100% certain, and he's the only one who knows the innards of the detection system, and solar artifacts at sundown and whatnot, and knows if he tells the idiots up there that we've detected a nuclear attack on us, they are gonna start firing, so he took his chances, after all, you can always start firing after the first nuke hit is confirmed by telephone, unless the nukes are simultaneously launched to hit all your launching stations all at the same time, 100% of them, and then you have no time to wait because the first hit is the final hit and kill everything at once, not spread out in time. But it was very worth the risk. But when people get too paranoid, they could become very trigger happy. So if we have people living in space going about their business not giving a crap about people and countries down here pounding the shit out of each other with ICBM nukes, that would be a pawsitive thing, something to be happy about when everything else is going wrong. It all starts with lack of trust, and spyware built into the recovery CD you get directly from the computer manufacturer, then it just escalates from there.. sigh.. the way to deescalate it is to send a couple diplomats over, with a gift, like a carefully crafted Go board and set, and some baby elephant and mother and family donation to a Chinese zoo.. and some tigers...

Re:Seriously can you blame them (1)

Tough Love (215404) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618457)

...you can't honestly call it "free trade" if one country's products are banned.

Would that country be the Republic of Apple by any chance?

Re:Seriously can you blame them (2)

AHuxley (892839) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618527)

Lots of nations ban all telco products from their secure buildings or block nations for bidding for backhaul, trunk lines for national security. Nations set real hard gov standards eg. consumer grade phone or device can be taken into a gov building or what select brand or version is fully cleared for their bureaucracy. No phone, only one brand of phone for "interoperability" or what meets min encryption standards. Nations have done that for decades. The wider population can still buy a expensive consumer grade phone and enjoy been see with it in park, city, cafe.

Re:Seriously can you blame them (1)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618663)

Like US free trade.

Iran? Syria? Ukraine? Let the MARKET solve that! Supporting sanctions is like French-kissing Karl Marx!

Re:Seriously can you blame them (3, Funny)

Dantoo (176555) | about a month and a half ago | (#47620227)

The US should respond instantly by banning the purchase of Huawei hardware for use in government installations. That will teach them a lesson they won't forget fast!

Re:Seriously can you blame them (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47620687)

HUAWEI

Re:Seriously can you blame them (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47618343)

Times have changed
Our politicians are getting worse
They won't obey liberty and freedom
They just want to litigate and sue!

Should we blame the government?

Or blame society?

Or should we blame the images on TV?

No, blame NSA!

Blame NSA!

(etc)

we will just use an knock off made at the same fat (4, Interesting)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617617)

we will just use an knock off made at the same factory as your own stuff.

This is the price you pay... (4, Insightful)

Meditato (1613545) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617623)

...for cooperating with the Machiavellian pro-war, pro-surveillance, pro-torture old boy's club in the federal bureaucracy.

Re:This is the price you pay... (1)

Jeremi (14640) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617659)

Totally true -- but it's probably less than the price they'd pay for not co-operating.

Re:This is the price you pay... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47617735)

are you referring to China?

Re:This is the price you pay... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47618115)

Who? China or US?

Re:This is the price you pay... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47618757)

Maybe Apple should have 2 product lines one for internal USA use, laden with its Govt spyware, and the other for the reset of the world - without.

Re:This is the price you pay... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47619705)

China: "Apple won't allow us to back-door their products. Ban them!"

Slashdot: "Hurr durr Apple is teh sucx LAWL."

Notice they haven't banned Android? Tastes so good, fascist police states ask for it by name!

Meanwhile in Poland... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47617627)

... the government bought iPads for all the members of parliament.
Such obedient 3rd world country...

"Isolating" by choosing open source? (5, Insightful)

Skarjak (3492305) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617631)

Up to now, they've been banning proprietary products for the benefit of more open ones. I know that we like to show China as a country with isolationist tendencies, but I'm not sure the glove fits on this one. I don't think choosing not to get screwed by Microsoft or Apple is such a bad thing.

Re:"Isolating" by choosing open source? (2)

armanox (826486) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617897)

I also remember them moving away from Intel-based stuff in general, in favor of MIPS that they can design and build everything themselves.

Re:"Isolating" by choosing open source? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47619751)

You are referring to Longsoon and Godson processors. They're uh . . . kind of slow. Expect China to go ARM eventually.

Re:"Isolating" by choosing open source? (1)

armanox (826486) | about a month and a half ago | (#47619911)

I hope not. The Longsoon's are about the only desktop MIPS processor still around - and I remember seeing they were having a set of updates to the lineup. There is no reason they couldn't be brought up to speed.

FWIW, I'd buy one of their laptops if they were sold stateside (instead, I'll just keep playing with my old SGI equipment).

Desktop is what you make it of (1)

marxmarv (30295) | about a month and a half ago | (#47620163)

*shrug* Samsung Electronics has some tempting little eight-ARMed chips that would feel great on a Mini-ITX motherboard. Still not FOSS, but if that's really important to you, there's lowRISC (Berkeley RISC-V including development toolchain and Linux image) and just now Parallax's Propeller [parallax.com] for your I/O needs...

Re:"Isolating" by choosing open source? (4, Insightful)

erikkemperman (252014) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618087)

Presumably they are choosing not to get screwed by NSA, through proxies such as Apple and MS. But otherwise I agree entirely.

I wish headlines such as

China seems to be on a mission to isolate itself from the world, at least in terms of technology.

Would more often be accompanied by its root cause, something along the lines of

America seems to be on a mission to antagonize the rest of the world, not least in terms of technology.

Re:"Isolating" by choosing open source? (2)

rtb61 (674572) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618761)

When the government pushes particular products, the education is forced to follow suit and industry then complies. So not isolationist at all but setting the pace. This will end up proving problematic for both M$ and Apple as it spreads throughout the China supply and procurement channel and inevitably influences the export channel. M$ has lots of other directions to go in but Apple is a marketing company pushing an overpriced fashion fad, this sort of thing can have a real impact on that 'marketing cache' that illusion that dramatically props up their profit margins.

Re:"Isolating" by choosing open source? (1)

zippthorne (748122) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618865)

Not sure how much it makes sense to ban Apple, then, as opposed to Microsoft, considering that at least a portion of Apple products are open source [apple.com]

You may have been asleep for the past 20 years (0)

marxmarv (30295) | about a month and a half ago | (#47620111)

but, hi, there's something called Android that's well over 90% permissively licensed.

Huwaei (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47617655)

It isn't really that interesting when you consider the snowden leaks and our turn about with huwaei and zte in regards to US government infrastructure.

Somebody wants some thing (1)

Registered Coward v2 (447531) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617667)

Once they get it, all will be forgotten

Nonsense (4, Insightful)

xfizik (3491039) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617669)

"China seems to be on a mission to isolate itself from the world, at least in terms of technology."
Why would they want to isolate themselves from the world? They may be looking to increase security (with the whole NSA mess, I wouldn't blame them) or trying to cut a better deal with Apple. There may be other rational reasons too.

Re:Nonsense (4, Insightful)

steppin_razor_LA (236684) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617705)

Agreed. The US refused to purchase equipment from Chinese technology companies because of security concerns. Now the tables have turned and we mock them for being isolationists?

Re:Nonsense (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47618351)

we mock them cause if there is a security hole, they fucking put it there

Re:Nonsense (1)

antdude (79039) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618383)

China is just copying USA like they always do. ;) [grin]

Self-awareness (2)

marxmarv (30295) | about a month and a half ago | (#47620115)

is anti-American. Stop that.

SOP (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47620501)

You will find that this is standard operating procedure for all governments, actually. And even non-governments. More than a few people have hypocritically condemned others for things they do...

Re:Nonsense (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47620763)

Now the tablets have turned...

Fixed it for you.

Re:Nonsense (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617811)

I expect you're right... but actions like this could very well cause companies like Apple and Microsoft to start exploring other manufacturing options away from Foxconn.

I know the camera makers and har drive manufacturers already have a significant presence in Thailand, so I can't imagine it would take much more than a willingness to invest sufficient capital in order to move iPhone manufacturing there.

Re:Nonsense (4, Insightful)

mspohr (589790) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618007)

Apple and Microsoft (and most other corporations) pick manufacturing locations based on price and quality. They choose China because it offers the lowest cost and good quality. They aren't going to pick up and move (even if they could find another capable manufacturer) for political reasons.
China is taking this step not to isolate themselves from the world but to isolate themselves from the NSA.

Re:Nonsense (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47618285)

What about Huawei?

Re:Nonsense (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47619779)

You know those "camera companies" and "hard drive makers" are just fronts for Shadaloo, right?

Nonsense (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47618063)

It's possible they're concerned about security.

However far more likely it's protectionism and they're trying to carve out space for a local company that can't compete with the likes of Apple and Microsoft.

If security were really the issue it would be likely that other nations would be doing similar for the same reasons. However that isn't really the case.

Re:Nonsense (1)

xfizik (3491039) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618187)

Yes, and that could be another rational reason, not isolationism. Btw, Russia also stopped buying Apple products for government use not so long ago.

Re:Nonsense (2)

AHuxley (892839) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618459)

Carrying around, buying or installing another nations signals intelligence equipment is what most nations try to avoid.
Recall GODSURGE, IRONCHEF, IRATEMONKEY, SOMBERKNAVE, VALIDATOR, OLYMPUS, COTTONMOUTH via ANT.
http://cryptome.org/2014/01/ns... [cryptome.org]
If you like a phone like device you have COTTONMOUTH, CANDYWIRE with some DROPOUTJEEP, TOTEGHOSTLY.
Its not just the hardware as shipped or altered during shipment. Staff turn off a cell phone at a site and then turn it on 'outside' again - even that is interesting.
Other nations understood this risk over years and have the political understanding to push domestic production. A hall with 100's of local whitebox units vs the small. fast, well coded, expensive import.
With your own nations tech you understand the cpu, the motherboard, all cards, the code. With an import you risk a closed source blob on your motherboard as shipped or added.
Local skills and jobs get a boost, tech funding flows. Might even be an export product range.

Re:Nonsense (1)

pushing-robot (1037830) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618519)

Don't forget CEILINGCAT.

Fatal flaw: China can't adapt (4, Interesting)

ebusinessmedia1 (561777) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617671)

China has always been controlled from the center. In past eras, China has had technological and exploration advantages over the West that were wiped out by intrusion and isolation commanded from China's locus of concentrated power - whether via emperors, or the current regime.

Long run (maybe, even near-long-term) this does not bode well for China's prospects, because when one is sealed off from outside ideas and innovation, one will ultimately fall behind and adapt only in suboptimal ways. What results is a waste of social and intellectual capital.

or they just don't want nsa bugs in govt offices? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47617733)

all else equal simplest explanation & all...

Re:Fatal flaw: China can't adapt (1)

ttsai (135075) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617819)

Long run (maybe, even near-long-term) this does not bode well for China's prospects, because when one is sealed off from outside ideas and innovation, one will ultimately fall behind and adapt only in suboptimal ways. What results is a waste of social and intellectual capital.

China is only refusing to buy some foreign products. There is no policy of isolation. I imagine there will still be a great deal of reverse engineering and other data gathering activities (interpret that how you wish). So, the idea is to negatively impact competitors financially while at the same time benefiting from their innovations.

Re:Fatal flaw: China can't adapt (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47617947)

you have no idea of what you are talking about. Refusing to use Apple or Microsoft product for Government use has nothing to do with isolation.

Its a wise move and any country who doesnt lick the a$$ of the US should do the same ASAP

Re: Fatal flaw: China can't adapt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47618401)

I don't think anything of social redeeming value or any kind of intellectual value has come from America in quite some time.

Re:Fatal flaw: China can't adapt (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47618407)

Nice talking, only problem is it doesn't mean a thing. It is the US that is increasingly alienating everyone else in the globe, while still burying the heads in the sand and pretending they run the show. You are the ones that should worry about isolation, and better start to worry about that FAST.

Fatal flaw: China can't adapt (4, Insightful)

misosoup7 (1673306) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618427)

China has always been controlled from the center. In past eras, China has had technological and exploration advantages over the West that were wiped out by intrusion and isolation commanded from China's locus of concentrated power - whether via emperors, or the current regime.

Long run (maybe, even near-long-term) this does not bode well for China's prospects, because when one is sealed off from outside ideas and innovation, one will ultimately fall behind and adapt only in suboptimal ways. What results is a waste of social and intellectual capital.

That makes no sense. China just banned its government from using Apple products, not Apple products in general. It hasn't sealed itself from outside ideas and innovations at all. Chinese citizens can still buy iPads and iPhones so Chinese smartphone manufactures still has to compete.

Another reason why this may have happened that most people probably wouldn't think about is that this might be a move to fight corruption. iPads and iPhones have been vastly popular as "gifts" within the government. Banning the government from purchasing them as gifts would help to fight some of the corruption problem they're having.

Who wants NSA espionage? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47617677)

Good move. Criminal activities of US agencies must stop.

Re:Who wants NSA espionage? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47617745)

The NSA spies on China (and other countries), the equivalent Chinese agency spies on the USA (and other countries). Are you seriously suggesting that the USA should unilaterally stop spying on China? I guess you must be Chinese...

Re:Who wants NSA espionage? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47619291)

The NSA also spies on US citizens (including members of congress). This is against US laws and so the AC was correct when they said " Criminal activities of US agencies must stop."

where does it say anything about stop spying or only the US spies?

I am jealous (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47617695)

I think this was a stupid idea but I am jealous how decisive the Chinese government can be.

Re:I am jealous (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47617845)

It's funny this should come out right after the Pope tells us we should put away our devices.

Re:I am jealous (1)

Ralph Wiggam (22354) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617955)

Authoritarianism has its perks.

Is it a big hit to Apple's bottom line? (4, Insightful)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617743)

Since this only affects government purchases, we'd have to know whether a significant part of last quarter's Chinese sales involved government entities purchasing these products.

I'd expect government sales - especially to China - aren't a huge part of Apple's business.

Re:Is it a big hit to Apple's bottom line? (1)

thieh (3654731) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617829)

Imagine you can't bring apple devices into your local government-operated buildings like library or DMV. That will be enough to make the hit huge because nobody wants to have that kind of inconvenience. Yet in a place where human rights is restricted, that is a totally forseeable development.

Re:Is it a big hit to Apple's bottom line? (4, Insightful)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618493)

Imagine you can't bring apple devices into your local government-operated buildings like library or DMV.

All you can do is imagine that since it's not what China did. They banned government procurement of those devices.

Since when have Chinese been great followers of government rules anyway?

Re:Is it a big hit to Apple's bottom line? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47618685)

Since this only affects government purchases, we'd have to know whether a significant part of last quarter's Chinese sales involved government entities purchasing these products.

I'd expect government sales - especially to China - aren't a huge part of Apple's business.

I'd imagine quite huge, because corruption*

Not the legal definition, but the kind that's perfectly legal or legal enough,* like campaign contributions leading to favors that can never directly be traced back to a favor, but it's pretty obvious the lobbyists influence has a pretty direct relationship with the $$ spent or the prime minister of australia's daughter somehow getting a scholarship from a school that no students at the college had ever heard of or had access to. Or just workers, particularly management sticking a few toys or some fancy phones that aren't strictly neccesary into the budget... The last one's pretty harmless, but what if those toys couldn't be apple products and the organization is as huge as the chinese government

See plunkitt on honest graft vs. dishonest graft to grok this: http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/plunkett-george/tammany-hall/#s01

Ripe for Linux in china...or new ChinaOS (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617789)

So lets get this right...China are investigating Microsoft for antitrust, and outright banning of Apple. Time is right and MIPS64 is looking ever so attractive.

Re:Ripe for Linux in china...or new ChinaOS (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47617835)

You mean the Chinese will start pirating Linux next?

The only way to get them to use Linux is to tell them it costs something.

Re:Ripe for Linux in china...or new ChinaOS (3, Funny)

nightsky30 (3348843) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617883)

You mean the Chinese will start pirating Linux next?

The only way to get them to use Linux is to tell them it costs something.

Illegally connect and use RedHat repos?

Re:Ripe for Linux in china...or new ChinaOS (1)

gnasher719 (869701) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618479)

So lets get this right...China are investigating Microsoft for antitrust, and outright banning of Apple. Time is right and MIPS64 is looking ever so attractive.

You got that wrong. Some Apple products cannot be purchased for government use. All the Chinese people are free to buy iPhones, iPads and Macs for their own private use, or for business use. Just not inside the government. Well, the German government is said to be looking at mechanical typewriters for some purposes...

*Door opens* (1)

nightsky30 (3348843) | about a month and a half ago | (#47617879)

Good news everyone...

The journalism I expect from Slashdot. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47617987)

"This is a potentially big hit to Apple, which generated around 16 percent of its $37.4 billion in revenue last quarter from China. Apple saw its iPad sales jump 51 percent and Mac sales boosted 39 percent in China."

OK. That tells us absolutely nothing. How much of Apple's sales were to the Chinese *government*?

I'm not picturing Chinese government offices as full of shiny new Macbook Pros.

In other news... (1)

mpthompson (457482) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618061)

...productivity in Chinese government offices rise sharply.

Re:In other news... (1)

rogoshen1 (2922505) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618269)

Good thing they aren't Ruby devs working out of coffee shops. This move would cripple them.

Hacking? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47618151)

China knows which products they can hack, and which are secure. They practice almost as much as the NSA.
They know that if they can hack 'em, so can others.
They avoid Apple products. ... maybe it's just a coincidence.

Re:Hacking? (1)

zippthorne (748122) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618919)

While I'm inclined to believe that Apple's products are unlikely to be secure against the level of hacking that a state actor could afford to level, your assertion makes the assumption that China doesn't want to be able to hack the computers of government employees....

f*ck 'em! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47618309)

If they don't want to buy US sh*t then the US shouldn't buy theirs either. Wonder who'll win THAT pissing contest.... Figure Wally-world will be the loser.

Re:f*ck 'em! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47619327)

Learn to read, it says government use.

By the way, the US did the same thing some time ago.

PS. If the US doesn't buy their "shi*t" what will wally-world sell?

Pretty hard pressed to see "made in the USA" on most items these days. Go try to find a "made in the USA" pair of boxer shorts or some trivial item.

Isolate? ... No .. (2)

CaptainDork (3678879) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618409)

"China seems to be on a mission to isolate itself from the world, at least in terms of technology."

They didn't say that. They said they don't want GUBMINT to use APPLE stuff. That doesn't shut down China's entire technology capability.

There are other people in China.

2015 - Chinese year of the Linux desktop! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47618521)

2015 - Chinese year of the Linux desktop!

Article is false and misleading (4, Informative)

MikeMo (521697) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618539)

China has not banned any Apple products. Some were not included in the "green" catalog because Apple failed to submit data [macdailynews.com] .

Re:Article is false and misleading (3, Insightful)

Wingsy (761354) | about a month and a half ago | (#47620193)

This is Slashdot. A false and misleading article is as good as the truth.

Why? (1)

El_Oscuro (1022477) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618611)

I mean, isn't all of Apples shit made in China anyway? That would be like the US government banning GM cars.

Re:Why? (1)

mjwx (966435) | about a month and a half ago | (#47619233)

That would be like the US government banning GM cars.

The efficiency and reliability of the US Government fleet would increase whilst costs reduce?

Well if they go all Microsoft (1)

itsphilip (934602) | about a month and a half ago | (#47618631)

It should be way easier for the US to conduct electronic espionage

iPhones and Windows 8 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month and a half ago | (#47619747)

Yeah I banned those too. Haven't had any trouble communicating...

I'm sure government purchases are a small fraction (1)

msobkow (48369) | about a month and a half ago | (#47619907)

I'm sure government purchases are a small fraction of the total purchased by the general public.

There are many government agencies around the world which haven't approved Apple, Microsoft, Blackberry, or other particular products for their purchase lists. Government purchases are just a nice feather in the cap for most companies. They really could care less, other than some people amongst the general public who think government purchase approval is some sort of "security approval" for a device.

They want the mass market. And that has not been cut off by China by any means.

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