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Giant Greek Tomb Discovered

samzenpus posted about 4 months ago | from the digging-up-the-past dept.

Science 164

schwit1 writes Archaeologists have uncovered the largest tomb ever discovered in Greece and think it is linked to the reign of Alexander the Great. "The tomb, dating to around 300 BC, may have held the body of one of Alexander's generals or a member of his family. It was found beneath a huge burial mound near the ancient site of Amphipolis in northern Greece. Antonis Samaras, Greece's prime minister, visited the dig on Tuesday and described the discovery as 'clearly extremely significant'. A broad, five-yard wide road led up to the tomb, the entrance of which was flanked by two carved sphinxes. It was encircled by a 500 yard long marble outer wall. Experts believe a 16ft tall lion sculpture previously discovered nearby once stood on top of the tomb."

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The tomb of Geryon! (1)

wheelbarrio (1784594) | about 4 months ago | (#47669361)

Or Enceladus perhaps?

Re:The tomb of Geryon! (4, Informative)

nava68 (2356090) | about 4 months ago | (#47669427)

Since Roxana (Alexanders wife) and his son Alexander IV were killed in Amphipolis by one of the Diadochen it could be either one of them or the Diadochen (Cassandos) who was buried in that tomb. Btw the excavation is running now for more than one year - hardly news except that Samaras went there for a visit and archeologist plan to enter within the next few months...

Re:The tomb of Geryon! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669489)

I had a little muslim
no bigger than my thumb
I put him in a pint pot
and there I bid him drum

He had a little bomb belt
and blew us all to hell
so if you've a little muslim
piss in the pot as well

Re:The tomb of Geryon! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47671339)

My guess would be Alexander's father, Philip.

He had a cult following AFTER his death.

meh (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669369)

It should be a requrement for people to include all of the measurments in metrics so people shouldn't be requred to dechipher how many feetsies are there in a yard and how much that is in crows wings, car tyres, pencil lenghts, cat paws etc.

meh (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669377)

It should be a requirement for people leaving primary school to be able to convert units.

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669415)

Given this article [nasa.gov] , I'm going to have to concur.

There will always be conflicting standards. Better to learn to deal with them early than to wave your fist impotently at them until you kill someone.

Re:meh (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669435)

OK.
"It is ordained that 3 grains of barley dry and round do make an inch, 12 inches make 1 foot, 3 feet make 1 yard, 5 yards and a half make a perch, and 40 perches in length and 4 in breadth make an acre."

Oh it's based on barley, i thought the whole system is flawed but now i know it all makes sense, so next time just write 90.9090909090909090909090909 perches and I'll know thats like 499,99999999 in yards (Sorry 500 doesnt divide by 5 and a half), just multiply that by three and then 12 and get inches, now multiply by three, whip out that barley sack and start to line them up to get a seeable reference.

Thanks man.

Re:meh (4, Funny)

TapeCutter (624760) | about 4 months ago | (#47669531)

All you need to know is that a greek giant is buried under the mound so obviously the giant was larger than an average greek but smaller than the mound. His exact height in barley grains will have to remain a "known unknown" until they dig him up.

Re:meh (1)

SternisheFan (2529412) | about 4 months ago | (#47669927)

Okay, I'm confusesd.

So, how many barley grains are there in a "Standard Library of Congress" (U.S. version, not the metric one)?

Re:meh (3, Informative)

denzacar (181829) | about 4 months ago | (#47670579)

A plethora.

Re:meh (2)

RandomFactor (22447) | about 4 months ago | (#47671449)

So Denzacar, would you say it has a plethora of Barley Grains?

Re:meh (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669469)

For the useless endeavor of catering to 5% of the world population? No, thanks, we are quite happy using the SI and base 10 conversions. Also, it comes with the benefit of NOT needing to state the country issuing a specific measurement or whether is intended to use at sea or land (not to mention funny prefixes like gross).

I can understand if there were any clear benefit to use the old imperial units, but there is none (zero, zilch, nada, other than nationalistic pride) and lots of downsides, so is about time you guys enter the 20 century and make life simpler for everyone.

Re:meh (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669725)

Here are two propositions:

- The scientific and technical world should use the SI wherever doing so would not increase confusion;

- Every adult without severe learning difficulties should be able to convert popular alternative units - certainly approximately in their head, and (perhaps with reference to a table) exactly where needed.

I agree with both of these propositions.

I am a European brought up on the metric system. But, just as I understand why analog communications systems are easier to grasp because of the direct correlation between physical and electromagnetic quantities, I understand that imperial systems can be easier to grasp because of the correlation between the names of popular units and their meanings. For example, a foot is about a foot's length. 30 centimetres is... eh, something you know only because you know what a centimetre or a metre is. Believe it or not, when creating a layperson's summary of some structure, you don't actually need to know whether it's exactly x cm or x+-20% cm. Your base desire for quantitative exactness won't improve your qualitative understanding of the system, which is what really matters.

What is more, imperial measurements are de rigueur in the US, and occasionally popular outside the US (e.g. miles standard for roads in Britain). It would require more work for the average visitor to a US-centric site if quantities were expressed in SI - remember that /. is a geek laypersons' news site, not a domain-specific news site.

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47670225)

Are you serious? 30 cm are always 30 cm, a foot is.. what? About the length of an average feet from an adult? How do you explain that to a kid? Or a woman with small feet? Or to a tall person with long feet? Imperial units are only easy to grasp if your body is an approximate match to the "standard" unit, for anyone else is an annoyance.

And no matter how you spin it, a knot is not an intuitive concept, and the same with miles, tons and actually most of the units.

As for your last paragraph, yes you can use it in the US, UK and a couple of backwater countries perhaps, which totals to about 5% of the world population, but even so you can't escape the metric system, even in a geek site like /. Most of us are ALREADY exposed to it when counting fractions of a second for instance (ie, mili, micro, pico, nano, etc) and when counting storage capacity (kilo, mega, giga, etc) and most gamers are exposed to them as well (even the US military games use km as a standard - aka click in military jargon), so most geeks are well aware of the SI.

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47670527)

How do you explain that it's the size of a decent size adult male foot? Are you being deliberately obtuse, or do you think that there are women/children who have never seen men before? And since this IS about approximation, not actually an instruction manual, that's good enough.

A mile is incredibly intuitive: mille passum. A tun is a large wine cask. A knot isn't so obvious if you're no sailor, agreed.

You're speaking English, which is the primary language of about 5% of the world's population (why aren't we all speaking some Chinese, since more people have that as primary language?), AND on a site designed to cater primarily to that audience, so I'm not sure what your % argument has to do with it. We're all aware of the SI - I am British and Spanish by heritage, and a mathematician by trade, and perfectly aware of the system - but I am also not culturally nor linguistically clueless.

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47671137)

There is no difference between explaining someone the (relative size) of another person feet and what 30 cm is about. If they can grasp one concept, they can grasp the other and nothing prevent you from using other things as approximation to metric units (for instance, a meter is about the distance between the average adult wrist and his/her chest), so it is as good to give approximate sizes as anything imperial.

As for the mile, yeah, right. Because everyone's steps are always the same size, all the time. And sure enough, we geeks always have a casket of amontillado in our basements, just in case.

The main issue is that having competing metric systems is problematic, and most of the word has already deprecated obsolete systems in favor of better ones, and I mean better under virtually any criteria. The imperial system was born in a time where it was good enough for what it was meant to do, but those times are over. Most of the population are neither military (for which a mille passum makes slightly more sense while marching), works in the wine industry or agriculture, so the convenience of most of the imperial units is lost on them, while they still have the burden of perform complex conversion between the different units.

And seriously, if you are a mathematician by trade, the notion of consider a ton "a large wine cask" would make you cringe, because is completely useless to convey the message to someone who has never seen or weighted one (try using that definition to explain the concept to a kid and see what happens. Or to a foreigner; large? how large? wine? what density? casket? hmm... I've seen one in a pirate movie)

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47671327)

Lol, yep, I'm either obtuse or aware that populations statistics differ geographically. For instance, there are several pygmy tribes around the globe where the average height for adult males is less than 155 cm (about 5 feet). Sadly for your argument, they also tend to have proportionally small feet, so yes, I'm sure that there are thousands of men, women and children for whom "a feet" is a completely alien unit.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pygmy_peoples

As for "good enough" is all a matter of perspective. If you are ok with an approximation error of 20-30% of the measurement, sure, why not?

Re:meh (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47670255)

Double meh.

As above states, a foot (male, adult, farmer) is about a foot. Further, "a pint is a pound the world around". One ounce (liquid) of water weighs one ounce (in the USA). One horsepower is what it is (assuming an average workhorse like a Morgan, not an Arabian, nor a Clydesdale). So some of it makes a lot of sense, at least to farmers who used the units on a daily basis. In the UK, maybe not so much (1 pt = 20 oz), but then the UK has problems with proper spelling too, often inserting unnecessary letters (like "colour" when they mean "color").

In the 21st century none of this matters too much, since Google can even handle the infamous "386,000 miles per second = ? furlongs per fortnight".

Posting a/c since I'm moderating this thread.

Re:meh (1)

Calydor (739835) | about 4 months ago | (#47670795)

Are you SERIOUSLY saying that England is the one spelling the English language wrong, or was this more tongue-in-cheek than can be conveyed easily in text?

Re:meh (1)

johnlcallaway (165670) | about 4 months ago | (#47670349)

It is expensive and has low return trying to convert 95% (statistic made up) of a country's population to another standard. Both systems are taught both in school, and people choose to use the one that is most prevalent, although both units show up in many products. Both systems require rote memorization and can be confusing (deca/deci for example).

And of course, those in favor of the metric system often conveniently forget to mention that conversions are not all purely powers of ten. When dealing with data, it's often powers of 2, making conversion not so simple there either. And time is still difficult to deal with. It seems the advocates are willing to deal with some difficult conversion, but can't do math well enough in their head for others.

It may be simple for you to shift decimal points, but it's also rarely necessary to convert feet to yards, let alone inches to miles. No one needs to determine how many feet/hour or inches/second while they are driving. Try converting kilometers/hour to meters per second in your head, you can't just shift decimal points.

One conversion used the most by Americans is in cooking, converting cups to quarts or teaspoons to tablespoons. But even that is rarely used since it's pretty damn easy to measure out 4 cups instead of 1 quart. Doubling recipes is pretty easy, although some are fraction-challenged. Tripling or quadrupling can be difficult, but most rarely need to do it.

Probably the most difficult is converting square or cubic measurements, since those tend to gum up the works pretty well. Converting cubic inches to cubic feet, or cubic feet to cubic yards is cumbersome. When I want accuracy, I use the calculator that is on my phone.

Exact values probably aren't always necessary when converting between systems either It's pretty simple to estimate from one system to the other. One can multiply or divide by 2 to convert kilograms and pounds, a meter and a yard are pretty close, as are a liter and a pint. Convert Kilometers to miles is the hardest at 0.6, but it's pretty simple to convert miles to kilometers (add half again as much).

But we rarely have to do that in the US because everything is labeled in imperial units. If you are reading our stuff, learn to convert.

And the same goes for Americans reading your stuff. We no more need to cater to you than you need to cater to us.

meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669569)

Unit conversions are a different thing entirely. If you think you are so hot convert 5 hoppus foot to qubic inches. Yes, that's how everyone else feels like reading about feet and yards and pencil lengths.

Re: meh (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669707)

D*ck.

Convert the asterisk genius

Re:meh (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669717)

It should be a requirement for people leaving primary school to be able to convert units.

It often is. I recall that we briefly mentioned imperial units in history class in primary school. A foot is 296.904mm but that wouldn't apply here since we are talking about Greek imperial units so we should probably use the Greek foot (pous) of 308.2 mm.
That is the thing with imperial units, every empire has their own. Once people started dealing with more than just the next nation and started to travel a little bit further the conversion became really complex. Metric would never have been adopted is imperial units had been usable.
The only thing that makes it possible to use imperial units at all today is that everyone except one group has been abandoned in favor of metric.

Re:meh (1)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about 4 months ago | (#47670687)

A foot is 296.904mm but that wouldn't apply here since we are talking about Greek imperial units so we should probably use the Greek foot (pous) of 308.2 mm.

Last I checked, a foot was 304.8mm (25.4mm per inch, 12 inches per foot).

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47671025)

Last I checked, a foot was 304.8mm (25.4mm per inch, 12 inches per foot).

It probably is, where you live.
Where I live that isn't the case. Imperial units are region specific.

Re:meh (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669785)

It should be a requirement for people leaving primary school to be able to use metric units so as to be able to communicate with the rest of the world. And among themselves actually, while in the US I experimented by asking Americans questions like "how many ounces to the gallon" etc. Actually that particular one nobody ever answered correctly (most common answer was 64 when it is 128 - or 160 if you are from the UK and using the imperial versions).

Re:meh (1)

sumdumass (711423) | about 4 months ago | (#47670843)

No one answered because you would normally convert down to the next logical unit. You don't say the field was one million six hundred thousand and three hundred centimeters long. You say it is sixteenthousand and three meters or sixteen point zero zero three kilometers. 16003 meters. Like wise, every eight ounces is a cup, two cups (16oz) is a pint, two pints (32oz) is a quart , and four quarts (128oz) is a gallon.

Rarely would you need to know how many ounces are in a gallon unless you are doing something that specifically deal with it and by then, you likely already know.

Re:meh (1)

JustOK (667959) | about 4 months ago | (#47671231)

How many pints in a cup?

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669825)

Wait a second. Are you saying I should quit primary school?

Yes and no (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669917)

It is a requirement leaving primary school to be able to do a division. it is not a requirement to know what feet or yard or stones or furlong are. When you have an international audience, it is polite to use the international measurement methods that about 95% of the world use maybe put it in parenthesis near the medieval unit. like say 500 yards (about 450 meters).
 
This has an ecological impact by the way, because if thousand of people google "500 yards to meter" the electricity and time lost, would have been better spent on something else. If one person the submitter does it it is maybe 5 second lost to him and no big deal. If say 10000 persons do it, guessestimate international audience slashdot, that's 50000 seconds lost, electricity, bandwidth usage and so forth. Not a lot but cumulated over the years ? And jsut because the submitter does not want to make 1 step, he forces those loss on everybody else

Re:meh (1)

landoltjp (676315) | about 4 months ago | (#47670607)

Well, then. As a testament to the superlative American education system, the US should finish what they started in 1976 and join EVERYBODY ELSE in the world by FINALLY converting to metric!

Re:meh (2)

Oligonicella (659917) | about 4 months ago | (#47670821)

We do use metric. We also like to retain our Anglo-Saxon/Roman system. We don't feel like it taxes our brains like you all feel it taxes yours. Those who don't use the metric system in their daily lives tend to not convert easily. Those who do, can. We find it amusing that it generates such apoplexy in those abroad who can't.

Re:meh (-1, Troll)

nadaou (535365) | about 4 months ago | (#47669523)

Ah yes the metric system. The premier international system of internet trolling, quantified.

Re:meh (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669577)

American detected.

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47671161)

Figured that out, did we ?!

Re:meh (1)

AchilleTalon (540925) | about 4 months ago | (#47669537)

For authenticity, the author should have used ancient Greek measurements instead.

Re:meh (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669655)

For authenticity, the author should have used ancient Greek measurements instead.

A broad, 2.73 AtG wide road led up to the tomb, the entrance of which was flanked by two carved sphinxes. It was encircled by a 273 AtG long marble outer wall. Experts believe a 2.9 AtG tall lion sculpture previously discovered nearby once stood on top of the tomb.

Assuming that AtG was 5' 6" tall [pothos.org] .

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47670305)

So Alex wasn't really so great after all? I mean 168 cm is more like stunted than tall.

Re:meh (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | about 4 months ago | (#47670899)

Now, yes. Then, no. The average height of men participating in the Olympic games was about that. They were probably a little larger than normal. That made Alexander a little taller than normal.

Yes, I recognize you were being humorous. I was answering your qualifier which kinda dorked your joke. Should'a left it at one line.

Re:meh (0)

Dahlgil (631022) | about 4 months ago | (#47669565)

Yes its much easier to remember that a meter is the length of the path traveled by light in a vacuum during the time interval of 1/299,792,458 of a second, than it is to remember that a yard is about the length of three of my feet. I was up in Montreal recently and received a cup of water in a restaurant with a line drawn on it that said .25L. I thought that was hysterical. If their standard was the quart, it could have just said 1 cup.

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669607)

Whoa man you gotta like multiply 0.25 by 4 to get one liter its unnecessarily complicated why cant we just make a measurment of like average coffe cup by looking how much coffee people drink and when we arrive at some kind of measurment like volume of 293 ml of coffee at 90 degrees celsius we should make that a one cup. And usually there are people have one best friend we could name that one friend. 1 friend = 2 cups easy right? And then to further simplify we could make 12 cups a bunch of friends, so we could be free of all that 1000cm^2 of water at +4 that is so uninterestingly divisible by 10.
      BTW you dont need to be a rocket scientist to visualize 10 cm and multiply by 10.

Re:meh (1)

Dahlgil (631022) | about 4 months ago | (#47669625)

Huh?

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669651)

Just start stocking up on barley grains because imperial system isn't going anywhere.

Re:meh (1)

kamapuaa (555446) | about 4 months ago | (#47669617)

It's even easier than that- just think, one four millionth of an inaccurate estimate of the circumference of the Earth!

Re:meh (1)

DrXym (126579) | about 4 months ago | (#47669649)

I thought that was hysterical. If their standard was the quart, it could have just said 1 cup.

And if their standard was the schmoo it could have said 12 sczars. I shan't explain how many sczars are in one schmoo because I find it hysterical that people use some other form of measurement and not know this.

Re:meh (1)

Pastis (145655) | about 4 months ago | (#47669719)

If you just like approximations, and say that "a yard is about the length of three of my feet" and a meter is slightly more than a yard, then you know how much a meter approximately. If you want an exact length of a yard, then you measure it in meters.

If their standard was the quart, it could have just said 1 cup..

which cup variant ? imperial, US customary, US legal, japenese variants ???

Re:meh (1)

DrXym (126579) | about 4 months ago | (#47669593)

If the Telegraph is using imperial, it's probably as some weak protest against Europe (and almost the entire world) and their fangle dangle standard system of weights and measures.

Re:meh (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669657)

"so people shouldn't be requred..."

People? Which people? French people? The language of Slashdot is English, and the vast majority of people whose native language is English use Imperial measurements. In America, 310+ million people use Imperial; and in Britain, some 70 million use Imperial in their day to day lives: distances on highways are shown in "miles," speed limits are given in "miles per hour," and car speedometers are in mph. The British still commonly measure body weight in "stones" for chrissakes. It wouldn't surprise me if British cookbooks still preserved our traditional system of cups, teaspoons, etc., which goes so well with natural amounts like "1 egg" (as opposed to a metric recipe like "use 83 mL of milk and 1 egg").

But if you really must use a base 10 system of measurement, why stop at distances and weights? Why not 10 hours in a day instead of that awful 24 hours? How about 100 degrees in a circle? 10 months in a year? 10 days per week? 10 letters in the alphabet??

Re: meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669761)

No wonder British cuisine is so bad. It's based purely on luck.

The only good product out of British gastronomy is the English breakfast. Might be because not a single thing in it needs to be measured for mixing...

Re: meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47670003)

No wonder British cuisine is so bad. It's based purely on luck.

The only good product out of British gastronomy is the English breakfast. Might be because not a single thing in it needs to be measured for mixing...

The greatest english contribution to western civilization is (take your pick) :

- chips
- 5pm tea

English breakfast is definitely not of them.

Re:meh (2)

rossdee (243626) | about 4 months ago | (#47670061)

Officially, Britain uses the metric system. It is after all part of the EU

Other British Commonwealth countries use the metric system, including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, India, Sri Lanka, South Africa, Singapore, Malaysia, Kenya, Uganda, Zambia, Tanzania, PNG, Bahamas, Samoa, Tonga,

Re:meh (-1, Offtopic)

argStyopa (232550) | about 4 months ago | (#47669727)

If you don't like it, perhaps you should get your news from some other site that communicates with whatever measure you find more comforting?

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669775)

If you dont comfort me, perhaps you should communicate sites that measure your news findings?

Re:meh (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47670129)

Grow up, dumbfuck.

Re:meh (3, Insightful)

PPalmgren (1009823) | about 4 months ago | (#47669779)

If you want rough estimates, its simple. If its in feet, divide by 3 for meters. If its in yards, yards = meters. No, its not perfect, but its close enough, within 2% margin of error.

Its not going to change any time soon, and no amount of bitching is going to make it change any time soon, so get over it. I find it funny that the bitching usually comes from Europe, where language is about 'cultural identity' but you have to speak english to be functional in larger businesses. Using the same logic, we should eliminate Dutch, Italian, Greek, Finnish, Swedish, and so on because they're a minority method of communication.

Re:meh (2)

Reaper9889 (602058) | about 4 months ago | (#47670065)

I think your point count against you. /. is fairly large. It would be reasonable to apply the same standards as for a large business. Hence, you should standardize your communication. In this case that means English and metric. It is ok that you use it amongst yourself but it would be nice of you to try to keep it only amongst yourself :) The standard custom in Europe is more or less that if someone wouldnt understand otherwise, you speak English (at least for the larger places I have worked). Similarly, it would be nice if you wrote in metric if people wouldn't understand otherwise (which I think it can be assumed that some wont on a page as big as /.).

I personally do not mind yards and feet too much but I dislike miles since it depends on the country.

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47670071)

"If it weren't for us you would be speaking German"
- Someone who doesn't have to learn a second language anyway.

Re:meh (1)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 4 months ago | (#47670701)

It is not the problem of feet and yards, and the error is not 2% but roughly 10% ...
The problem are square feet versus square meters or acres versus hectar (german measure, 100 ars, where an ar is 100 square meters [10x10] ... or square miles versus square kilometers ... )
OTOH in special cases it makes sense to have your own units, like in sailing. No one is using km or km/h if he is traveling the seas, however we don't use 'miles' but nautical miles, which makes sense if you know how navigation works.

Re:meh (5, Funny)

Sockatume (732728) | about 4 months ago | (#47669829)

You really should've called them out on calling it "BC" rather than "BCE" while you were at it. What's pedantry without thoroughness?

Re:meh (1)

I'm New Around Here (1154723) | about 4 months ago | (#47670287)

Dammit, I used all my mod points yesterday. :^)

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669973)

It's very simple, there are 12 inches in a foot.

Or in Alexander's case, 6 inches in his ass.

Re:meh (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47670571)

And there is what is wrong with metric, it apparently makes people stupid to the point where simple math is to hard. I see all the whining, but it means when you boil it down is, "Whaaa I am to stupid to do simple conversions, basic math is beyond me".

Re:meh (0)

judoguy (534886) | about 4 months ago | (#47670649)

When your country becomes the largest military force on Earth, then YOU can dictate measurement units.

Until then, neener, neener!

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47671217)

Lol, funny that the largest military on earth uses metrics to perform most of their operations. Yep, that "click" you often hear is the jargon for ** kilometer.

Metric flunks the alien test (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47670667)

Odds of an alien civilization using something that easily converts to Metric? Pretty much zero. Decimal is an arbitrary base. The kilometer was based on the size of our planet originally. The metric system was later revised to be based on atomic measurements which are universal, but the bizarre selection of atoms isn't.

Of course the old units also fail the alien test.

Use Planck units, or you're just talking out of your ass.

Re:meh (5, Informative)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | about 4 months ago | (#47670975)

There's another article here [greekreporter.com] , which contains this quote from the prime minister:

This is a monument with unique features: A surrounding peribolos of 497 meters, almost a perfect circle carved in Thassos marble. The Lion of Amphipolis is 5.20 meters high; let’s imagine it as being on the top of the tomb

That article also shows a picture with a partial glimpse of the entrance. This article [greekreporter.com] from the same site has a picture of the lion, and the video down below is basically a slideshow of pictures of the tomb site. There's another article here [ekathimerini.com] with another exterior picture. The site of ancient Amphipolis is here [google.com] , on the land surrounded by the river (you can zoom in and see the ruins of the acropolis). Based on the pictures in the articles, it looks like the tomb itself is just northeast of the site, here [google.com] .

I'm not an archaeologist, I just play one on the internet.

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47671099)

It should be a requirement for people to stop acting like crybabies over the which measurement system they don't like.

Meh (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | about 4 months ago | (#47669375)

Complete lack of photos or any actual indication of size (other than the burial mounds size) or layout.

Re:Meh (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669529)

A few more photos here: http://news.in.gr/culture/article/?aid=1231340622

Re:Meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669941)

It is still very early in the dig process. The police have restricted and guard the area since the tomb may contain high amount of gold and precious artifacts which smugglers would love to steal. The tomb has been lost for thousands of years. A few more weeks patience is not that harsh a request, is it?

Re:Meh (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | about 4 months ago | (#47669949)

Then why go public now?

Re:Meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669995)

Why not? The official announcement has been made after the area was secured. Somehow, they had to explain why access to the area has been prohibited.

Re:Meh (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | about 4 months ago | (#47670949)

For those of use not requiring pictures to understand the basics. It may take fifty years to completely unearth this site and reconstruct what it looked like. Just hold your horses, more pictures will be on the way.

Re:Meh (1)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | about 4 months ago | (#47670987)

I just posted this [slashdot.org] farther up with some more links.

Is he... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669379)

... Is he dead?

ye call that a discovery?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669393)

Oh look, I discovered my car keys! I thought I'd lost them but they were in my pocket all along. What a discovery!!

Easy Identification (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669397)

How do you determine it to be an authentic Greek tomb?

The men are buried face-down.

Geek tomb? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669439)

In the first moment I thought they found someones petrified basement

Re:Geek tomb? (1)

Chrisq (894406) | about 4 months ago | (#47669459)

me too!

a fried tomb? (1)

turkeydance (1266624) | about 4 months ago | (#47669485)

what kind of grease?

Anyone else read that as (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669509)

Giant geek tomb?

Misread title (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669641)

I almost spewed my coffee all over my keyboard when I read this the first time. I read: "Giant GEEK tomb discovered".

Is it tomb of the second letter of greek alphabet? (3, Funny)

eye_blinked (2775553) | about 4 months ago | (#47669665)

Internetogists have discovered a vast tomb that they believe is connected with the reign of Dice, who conquered vast swathes of the ancient Internet. The tomb, dating to around 2014AD, may have held the archive of pre-beta slashdot. It was found beneath a huge burial mound near the ancient site of Andover.net in northern Cyberspace. Rick Astley visited the dig on Tuesday and described the discovery as "clearly extremely significant". A broad, five Tb pipe led up to the tomb, the entrance of which was flanked by two carved goatse.

Macedonia - the original! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669783)

[...] the ancient site of Amphipolis in northern Greece.

...what we Greeks always called and still call Macedonia*!
Sadly some Slavs -settled in the northern part of that region a millenium after Alexander's** death- with serious identity problems -caused by the former communist imperialism and current lack of effective "state building" ethnology- try to convince the rest of the world that you can be what ever you declare...
* Macedonia - meaning "highland" in Greek (and without any meaning in any other language).
** Alexander - meaning "protector of man" in Greek (and without any meaning in any other language).

Re:Macedonia - the original! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47669873)

I had a Greek ex and she was as annoying as you.

Sadly some Slavs

We get it: you're a racist.

a millen[n]ium after Alexander's death

And you live in the past.

the former communist imperialism

And McCarthyism 60 years too late has given you Golden Dawn.

ethnology

A little learning is a dangerous thing...

blah - meaning "blah" in Greek (and without any meaning in any other language)

Etymology is not the study of current penis size.

Re:Macedonia - the original! (1)

rossdee (243626) | about 4 months ago | (#47670177)

I remember back in the days of conflict in Bosnia, and NATO involvement, them calling the place "Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia" (FYROM)
to distinguish it from the Greek province

Read That as a Geek Tomb For a Second (1)

Greyfox (87712) | about 4 months ago | (#47669891)

And was pondering what would be in a geek tomb. Probably old Dilbert dolls, models from the original Star Trek, B5 and Firefly and a large pile of dirty laundry. Naturally it'd be found in Alexander the Great's basement.

Let me guess. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47670229)

It was full of old Texas Instruments calculators, Star Trek memorabilia, and coffee beans for the after life.

Wait, you said a Greek tomb? Why would we care about some dead frat boy?

Misread (1)

pellik (193063) | about 4 months ago | (#47670275)

Did anyone else read that as giant geek tomb discovered?

Re:Misread (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47670645)

Not likely. Your parents are never going into their basement again. Not after what they saw there the last time.

Only Major Site Not Stolen From (4, Informative)

Kagato (116051) | about 4 months ago | (#47670419)

One of the problems with the historical sites in Greece is so many of the large ones have been stolen from over the centuries. Want to see the full Parthenon? Better book a trip to the Vatican, Louvre in Paris and the British Museum what's still left for public viewing. Various conquers and rulers have been selling off bits and pieces of greek history for as long as Europeans have been collecting art.

Re:Only Major Site Not Stolen From (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47671291)

Where do I go to see the Library of Alexandria, which wasn't stolen from and distributed across a large geographical area? It seems like you think that doing this is a bad thing, I'm not so sure it.

Better pictures of the tomb (4, Informative)

sls1j (580823) | about 4 months ago | (#47670519)

Here is a better article with actual pictures [ancient-origins.net]

Surprising there are still so many things to find (1)

DutchUncle (826473) | about 4 months ago | (#47670757)

It's one thing to read about finding traces of ancient civilization using new RADAR and LIDAR technology over the South American jungle, a huge area where ground travel is rare and difficult; it's another to find "new" ancient ruins (not so ruined!) in a mostly modern country like Greece. Also, as with so many other constructs, impressive to see how much was done with sheer muscle power (including animals) and what we consider a low level of technology.

Re:Surprising there are still so many things to fi (1)

jfengel (409917) | about 4 months ago | (#47671193)

It is pretty damn remarkable. A lot of it is just a matter of time and money. A dig like this is expensive, because you need to do it with some delicacy. We could rip the top off that mound in an afternoon with bulldozers, losing huge amounts of information in the process. Instead it takes an army of grad students and many months.

Greece (and in fact the entire area through the Middle East) is just covered with such sites, where the locals know that something is buried under some hill or other, waiting for their Schliemann to decide to put forth the effort to dig it up and catalog it.

We're really fortunate about these sites, where something important happened and was then largely abandoned, or at least never progressed to becoming big population centers. Sadly, many sites continued to be used and are now modern, thriving cities, and the artifacts were either ripped out or buried in a way that we'll never be able to reach.

I admit ignorance about archeological stuff, (1)

mark_reh (2015546) | about 4 months ago | (#47670885)

but how hard is it to "discover" a tomb that has a 5 yard wide road leading to its entrance? With carved sphinxes on either side? Encircled by a 500 yard long marble wall? Seems sort of obvious to me.

Re:I admit ignorance about archeological stuff, (3, Informative)

jfengel (409917) | about 4 months ago | (#47671207)

Both the wall and the road (and the entrance) were buried as well.

They did know that something was there: it was obvious that this was a man-made hill. They didn't know how significant it was, and so it wasn't until now that they put together the funding and manpower to go look.

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