Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Yahoo Stops New Development On YUI

samzenpus posted about a month ago | from the end-of-the-line dept.

Yahoo! 79

First time accepted submitter dnebin writes Yahoo announced that they will cease new development on their javascript framework YUI, bowing to industry trends towards Node.js, Angular, and others. The announcement reads in part: "The consequence of this evolution in web technologies is that large JavaScript libraries, such as YUI, have been receiving less attention from the community. Many developers today look at large JavaScript libraries as walled gardens they don't want to be locked into. As a result, the number of YUI issues and pull requests we've received in the past couple of years has slowly reduced to a trickle. Most core YUI modules do not have active maintainers, relying instead on a slow stream of occasional patches from external contributors. Few reviewers still have the time to ensure that the patches submitted are reviewed quickly and thoroughly."

cancel ×

79 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

YUI 2.x was great, it wasn't until YUI3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797085)

YUI 2.x was stable and great, and it wasn't until YUI3 when there's a change of leadership. Too many screwups and wannabe with AMD style loading trying to mimick Dojo.

A drastic change of architecture like that with barely compatibility layer surely pissed of a lot of people.

Dumbass wannabe solution architect?

Re:YUI 2.x was great, it wasn't until YUI3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797167)

A drastic change of architecture like that with barely compatibility layer surely pissed of a lot of people.

And that's just the users, not the developers.

Dumbass wannabe solution architect?

But hey, Marisa told us to be agile(tm), so we changed everything and got it all done in sprints(tm) and even though the unresolved issues with the Finance and Sports sites continue to pile up [uservoice.com] and the userbase continues to dwindle away, at least we made a formerly functional UI use lots of AJAX, so even if it doesn't work for any of the users, we devs get to put all that Javascripty stuff on our resumes when we're looking for our next jobs. Thanks for the free career boost, Marisa! Remember, the only value your company actually has is the Alibaba IPO!

Re:YUI 2.x was great, it wasn't until YUI3 (0)

lucm (889690) | about a month ago | (#47797239)

Thank god for the Alibaba IPO. Someone has to pay for Tumblr.

This being said she can't take the whole blame for the Yahoo downfall. The company was already not doing well. At least they got some press coverage and nice photo ops out of the deal.

Re:YUI 2.x was great, it wasn't until YUI3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797243)

It's not Yahoo that Alibaba is going to destroy, it's Amazon.

Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (3, Interesting)

tepples (727027) | about a month ago | (#47797107)

From the featured article:

Finally, browser vendors are now committed to making continuous improvements to their web browsers while aligning more closely with standards.

I'm curious how long Microsoft will continue improving Internet Explorer for Windows 7. Microsoft has historically ended development of new IE features once a particular version of Windows goes into extended support. This means Windows Vista is stuck on IE 9, and unless IE 12 comes out before January 2015 [microsoft.com] , Windows 7 will be stuck on IE 11. In any case, even IE 9 supports enough of the W3C DOM that you might not need jQuery [youmightno...jquery.com] or any other monolithic framework in your site's JavaScript. People who can't give up IE might end up having to upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 8.1 with Classic Shell.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797195)

You should be using Chrome anyway.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797225)

ActiveX????

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1, Flamebait)

Gr8Apes (679165) | about a month ago | (#47797455)

You should be using Chrome anyway.

Yep - Google needs to know all my browsing history

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

Wootery (1087023) | about 1 month ago | (#47798909)

Fairly sure Chrome doesn't phone-home these details to Google. Maybe it does if you 'sign-in in Chrome', but I never saw the point in that.

Re: Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47803319)

Wow, that's quite some naivete. Every Google service phones home/tracks you whether or not you are logged in to your Google account. That's been their business model from day one. Every time you type something into the Chrome address bar, it automatically auto completes with Google search results. That's the phoning home. Literally every keystroke you enter into that bar is sent to Google's servers, and you're an idiot if you don't think their saving it.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

pete6677 (681676) | about 1 month ago | (#47800743)

Who would you rather have know your browsing history? Google or Microsoft. No way IE doesn't have some secret phone home feature.

Says you (1)

s.petry (762400) | about a month ago | (#47797975)

Chrome is is just like IE for more operating systems, no thanks I won't touch the stuff. Rating things on a combination of user security and functionality, Opera is hard to beat with Firefox in a close 2nd. I don't care how fast Chrome can load pages, I don't sit and watch memes flash by all day.

Re:Says you (1)

cyber-vandal (148830) | about 1 month ago | (#47799123)

In what way is it just like IE?

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (2)

Paradigma11 (645246) | about 1 month ago | (#47798867)

I am using IE for the first time now because i got a 4K screen and IE does a much better job at font rendering than chrome at that resolution.

Most likely firefox would be similar since it also uses Direct2d and DirectWrite but IE is ok for now.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about a month ago | (#47797347)

People who can't give up IE might end up having to upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 8.1 with Classic Shell.

Which is exactly why Microsoft does that, and why you should never build software that's dependent on closed source products. At best you're at the whim of the owner, and they may abandon you. At worst, they will see their position as leverage to force you into ever more expensive software contracts. Which is exactly what Microsoft does.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797463)

I really wish developers wouldn't use YUI or jQuery for things the web browser is more than capable of doing itself. As the entire obamacare site fiasco has shown, jQuery is just a bad idea in the hands of people who don't know when to use frameworks.

When to use a framework:
a) Never, as the default.
b) When you need functionality wrapping in a non-user-facing part of a site, eg administrative controls, where the version of the framework can be frozen
c) When the amount of javascript that needs to be written can be reduced by a factor of 100.

Most sites, load up the huge ass javascript framework than then use maybe two functions from it, things that are already thin enough and present in the browser (eg css transitions.) The "lightbox" effect that so many picture galleries use is actually LESS code to do by hand than to do with jQuery.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (4, Interesting)

tepples (727027) | about a month ago | (#47797531)

I really wish developers wouldn't use YUI or jQuery for things the web browser is more than capable of doing itself.

The whole reason for things like jQuery is that under old IE, the web browser wasn't capable of doing a lot of these things itself. If you go to the You Might Not Need jQuery site and set the compatibility slider to IE 8, for example, a couple solutions end up as "just use jQuery". Not needing massive workarounds for deficiencies in the latest version of the included web browser on a still-supported PC operating system is a relatively new concept. Five months ago, a Windows operating system that couldn't be upgraded past IE 8 was still in extended support.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about a month ago | (#47797735)

Broadening your point, jQuery does a fine job of harmonizing all of the bits of personality across vendors and versions. Buy all means, hack that javascript down by a factor of 100. . .but be sure to bulk up on testers and maintenance people to help you re-invent jQuery's host of fix-ups.
Not that any of that helped HealthCare.gov. I guess jQuery hasn't implemented polishLegislativeTurd() yet.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (2)

narcc (412956) | about 1 month ago | (#47798471)

.but be sure to bulk up on testers and maintenance people to help you re-invent jQuery's host of fix-ups.

You know that that's a long debunked myth, right?

jQuery was never good at "harmonizing all of the bits of personality across vendors and versions". It even introduced it's own long list of browser incompatibilities. Remember the IE8 fiasco? That was all due to the grossly incompetent design of jQuery. It's all on c.l.j, if you're willing to do a bit of digging.

I banned it ages ago, for technical reasons. I can't even begin to predict how many thousands of hours we've saved as a result.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 1 month ago | (#47798755)

It's all on c.l.j, if you're willing to do a bit of digging.

I daresay if there was any substance to your point (and I've read the jQuery source at some depth around the 1.7 era) then you'd've proffered a URL to go with your FUD, no?

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

narcc (412956) | about 1 month ago | (#47798811)

You quoted it. There's years worth of analysis there.

Re: Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47798831)

So I am guessing you meant to say 'no I do not have a citation, my opinion is fact'.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

bluec (1427065) | about 1 month ago | (#47799683)

I embraced it ages ago, for technical reasons. I can't even begin to predict how many thousands of hours we've saved as a result.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

CadentOrange (2429626) | about 1 month ago | (#47800617)

jQuery hardly qualifies as a "huge ass" javascript framework. The gzip minified production version of the script weighs in at under 34kB. Worst case scenario if you're hosting jQuery yourself, this is a one off download. This is hardly going to cause problems, even on a mobile data connection.

On the other hand, jQuery does make code a lot neater. Especially with judicious use of selectors [jquery.com]

.

p.s. Nice going trying to pin the Obamacare fiasco on jQuery. I don't think I've heard that one before.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (2)

Gr8Apes (679165) | about a month ago | (#47797465)

The sooner that pile of garbage, AKA YUI, dies, the better. Pulling the plug will only make it go away faster, and faster is definitely better in this case. This will be the first time I cheer something related to YUI.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (0)

Billly Gates (198444) | about a month ago | (#47797667)

Ha!

Good luck with that. Corporate apps and products coming out TODAY require IE 8 and MS specific hacks just to run. Because of this my employer will only buy software written to run on IE 8. Not W3C.

You better plan to support IE 8 until 2019 when you are ready to switch to HTML 5 or we will buy from a competitor who will. 80% of all other large companies operate the same way so good luck.

No way we will run classic shell or Windows 8. We just upgraded to Windows 7 for crying out loud! So expect jquery to be used for years to come. Many grandmas too will continue to use XP and IE 8 as well and expect the same support we received for the last half decade.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

terjeber (856226) | about 1 month ago | (#47799213)

Corporate apps and products coming out TODAY require IE 8 and MS specific hacks just to run

Then the people in your procurement division are morons. Why would they buy shit like that?

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

pete6677 (681676) | about 1 month ago | (#47800773)

The fact that your company is a dinosaur is not anyone else's problem. Microsoft does not care about losing your "business", which would consist of upgrading away from Windows 7 in 2019.

Re: Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | about a month ago | (#47814603)

But all companies operate the same. Everything out there only works in old IE

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

Camael (1048726) | about a month ago | (#47797885)

People who can't give up IE might end up having to upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 8.1 with Classic Shell.

Or, they could just stick with the browser and OS that they currently own.

I suspect that most people who can't give up IE fall into 2 broad categories, namely those who need it for work to access some legacy corporate website and those who use IE for convenience because it came with their OS by default.

Neither of these categories need the best and the brightest, and are thus likely to stick with the status quo (i.e. whatever works) unless forced to change. And when forced to change, they are probably going to rely on others to sort it out for them, whether it is their corporate IT department or their computer literate friends/family. In any case, expending cash on a new user unfriendly OS just to keep a browser's functionality is likely a less popular option than upgrading to one of the many free modern browsers available.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

cyber-vandal (148830) | about 1 month ago | (#47799155)

Or those that want to use group policy to control what users can do with the browser which IE does better than all the other browsers unsurprisingly.

Re:Continuous improvements to IE for Windows 7 (1)

terjeber (856226) | about 1 month ago | (#47799207)

how long Microsoft will continue improving Internet Explorer for Windows 7

For as long as Google will continue to update Chrome version 7. Why do you ask?

No mention of jQuery? (5, Insightful)

alphazulu0 (3675815) | about a month ago | (#47797159)

I'm sure someone will point out that jQuery is more of a library and YUI more of a framework, but they solve many of the same problems and people don't usually use both. I imagine jQuery's popularity is one of the reasons for YUI's decline, but no mention of it in the announcement.

az0

Re:No mention of jQuery? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797175)

No jQuery, bootstrap, foundation or backbone... yet node.js? Me thinks either the submitter or editor does not know what node is.

Re:No mention of jQuery? (0)

dnebin (594347) | about a month ago | (#47797519)

Sure, I know what node is. I also know the other 12 projects they did mention (and jQuery and others that they didn't). I also know that they wouldn't have accepted the submission if I had listed all 14...

Re:No mention of jQuery? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797589)

And yet, you still didn't understand why they mentioned Node.js.

Re: No mention of jQuery? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47803377)

No, you clearly don't. Because Node.js is server-side and YUI is client-side, and mixing up the two in front of literally thousands of developers is so laughably ignorant that it's really beyond words. What next? Are you going to write an article about how Rails is out competing HTML?

Yahoo: Taking the big risks! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797181)

lol

What does Yahoo! do? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797197)

Anything? AOL?

Re:What does Yahoo! do? (1)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | about 1 month ago | (#47799397)

What does Yahoo! do?

In Soviet Russia, Yahoo does YUI.

Ya-who? (1, Offtopic)

jenningsthecat (1525947) | about a month ago | (#47797199)

If I didn't maintain burner email accounts with them out of sheer inertia, they wouldn't even be on my radar.

Get your lingo right (2)

lucm (889690) | about a month ago | (#47797249)

If you maintain an email account, it's not a burner.

But YUI was super popular (0)

blitzrage (185758) | about a month ago | (#47797209)

So popular in fact, this was the first time I've heard of it.

Dr Yui (1)

rossdee (243626) | about 1 month ago | (#47798375)

Yeo, I thought he was the doctor that was the traitor in the Atreides camp because the Harkonnens had his wife hostage.

YUI YUI (1)

wbr1 (2538558) | about a month ago | (#47797233)

A million deaths were not enough for YUI.

Re:YUI YUI (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about a month ago | (#47797747)

I really needed a song:
"YUI-YUI
oh, baby
we gotta go. . ."

So This Is What The New CEO Boils Down To (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797359)

UI's define both product and web sites.

For instance, take ESRI's "fabled" ArcGis. Bloated, a labyrinth of confusion and almost un-functional. Compare to ITT's ENVI. Intuitive, simple, elegant.

ESRI get their money through quantum licensing, i.e. turn any javascript code into a module, however obvious, and demand a license for it.

Of course ITT has followed suit to some extent with ENVI and now IDL, but the the hallmark is usability. ESRI is just a Geographic garbage collection.

There's also the other major issue... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797383)

That the company in charge of creating the library will simply close up shop like an ADHD addled kid, JUST as yahoo did.

Staying away from unreliable short sighted developers makes good sense.

Glad I picked Dojo for a new project! :-) (0)

Paul Fernhout (109597) | about a month ago | (#47797481)

http://dojotoolkit.org/ [dojotoolkit.org] "Dojo starts with a minimal loader (less than 4KB gzipped) with thousands of loosely coupled lightweight modules and plugins available when you need them that are tested and maintained together for the best quality possible."

A few things I like about it are:
* internationalization
* accessibility
* modules
* support for making your own widgets

The first two (especially the second, accessibility) are examples of really important things that many developers leave for later when you are locked into a framework and discover they are not there.

Example:
"jQuery UI Accessibility Analysis"
https://www.ssbbartgroup.com/b... [ssbbartgroup.com]
"To summarize, the public jQuery UI library widgets as of July 1, 2013, are mostly inaccessible for both screen reader and keyboard only users."

Dojo is used in some IBM projects, so that is probably a big reason for the emphasis on accessibility and internationalization.

Of course, there are various things I don't like about Dojo (to begin with, the documentation leaves a lot to be desired when you are starting out). However, in general, so far, it is supporting us in doing everything we want to do... For example, I was very pleasantly surprised when the back button "just worked" when I used the URL "hash" module to navigate between virtual "pages" in a single page app (at least in FireFox, still need to test elsewhere).

Although I still have a fondness for the brilliance of Knockout.js for hooking up widgets to models...

This will eventually have an effect on Flickr. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797495)

Almost all of the Flickr webpages are based on YUI.

And the Flickr team just got done the 2nd or 3rd rehash since the May 2013 disaster (when they made the site unuseable for millions of people).

I just wonder how long (if ever) it will take to change Flickr pages over to some new system. And how badly they'll screw it up again.

YUI vs. Node.js ? (2)

Mister Liberty (769145) | about a month ago | (#47797505)

YUI and Node.js are juxtaposed here, whereas YUI (as far as I knew) was client-side and Node.js is server side javascript.
Never used either (use PHP and pure Javascript), so the confusion may be mine.

Re:YUI vs. Node.js ? (1)

dnebin (594347) | about a month ago | (#47797527)

They seem to think the decline of support behind YUI is somewhat based on node and other newer frameworks.

Re:YUI vs. Node.js ? (1)

squiggleslash (241428) | about a month ago | (#47797573)

Yeah, but why? That's a little like saying the decline in use of GTK is because Intel has a new C compiler out.

Re:YUI vs. Node.js ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797637)

Never used either (use PHP and pure Javascript), so the confusion may be mine.

How are you still employed in 2014? Do you live in a flyover state?

Re:YUI vs. Node.js ? (1)

narcc (412956) | about a month ago | (#47797697)

By using two of the most popular languages in the world?

Re:YUI vs. Node.js ? (1)

dave420 (699308) | about 1 month ago | (#47800089)

If they are doing anything with any level of complexity, they are very arguably using one wrongly. There are a reason lots of libraries exist for JS - implementations vary across browsers, and the base language is lacking some rather useful low-level features. If they are writing "pure JavaScript" and doing anything remotely complex, then they either bridged the gap themselves (by recreating the wheel, most likely incompletely), or are simply not using them (limiting compatibility).

Re:YUI vs. Node.js ? (1)

volovski (3782009) | about a month ago | (#47797943)

I thought the same thing. How does a client side replace a server side. Are we going back to all thin clients.

Re:Read the article vs. the summary? (1)

Bite The Pillow (3087109) | about a month ago | (#47797955)

You trusted the summary instead of reading the article. It's relatively brief, and it took me less than 10 seconds to roughly grasp the confusion.

Node.js is a very tiny part of the whole explanation.

Fuck it, you're not going to click so here's the relevant bits. I'm assuming Node.js injects script into the pages it creates, meaning those developers don't need script libraries (other than Node.js)

The emergence of Node.JS has allowed JavaScript to be used on the server side, opening the door to creating isomorphic single page applications. New package managers (npm, bower) have spurred the rise of an ecosystem of 3rd party, open source, single-purpose tools that complement each other, embracing the UNIX philosophy and enabling very complex development use cases. New build tools (Grunt and its ecosystem of plugins, Broccoli, Gulp) have made it easier to assemble those tiny modules into large, cohesive applications. New application frameworks (Backbone, React, Ember, Polymer, Angular, etc.) have helped architect web applications in a more scalable and maintainable way. New testing tools (Mocha, Casper, Karma, etc.) have lowered the barrier of entry to building a solid continuous delivery pipeline. Standard bodies (W3C, Ecma) are standardizing what the large JavaScript frameworks have brought to the table over the years, making them available natively to a larger number of devices. Finally, browser vendors are now committed to making continuous improvements to their web browsers while aligning more closely with standards. With so called âoeevergreen web browsersâ, which are making it easier for users to run the latest stable version of a web browser, we can expect a significant reduction in the amount of variance across user agents.

Re:YUI vs. Node.js ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47798009)

No, you are absolutely right

Re:YUI vs. Node.js ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47798523)

Also Angular.js is a MVC framework while YUI is a component library.

um (1)

cascadingstylesheet (140919) | about a month ago | (#47797563)

Yahoo announced that they will cease new development on their javascript framework YUI, bowing to industry trends towards Node.js, Angular, and others.

That's like when people used to talk vaguely about "talk radio" while somehow studiously omitting Rush L.

Just querying, ya know ...

Re:um (0)

Tablizer (95088) | about 1 month ago | (#47798441)

I wish talk radio would omit Rush. He's made enough racist comments for 10 Mancows, yet never booted.

I was a member of the YUI team... (5, Interesting)

clarle (3806979) | about a month ago | (#47797617)

First posted on /r/javascript on Reddit, but I think it's worth posting here too:

I was a member of the YUI team until a few months ago. I'm still at Yahoo now, just on a different team, but just wanted to give my own thoughts on this (I don't represent the company or the YUI team).

My software engineering career started with the YUI team - I actually joined as an intern at Yahoo because of a Reddit post on /r/javascript. I was pretty new to engineering in general back then, and as a biology major with no real professional experience, I didn't have an easy time getting internships. Jenny, the manager of the YUI team back then, really took a chance on me, and that really changed my entire career path. I solved a bunch of YUI bugs, added a few features here or there, and I always tried to help other folks on #yui on IRC, the mailing list, or in-person here at Yahoo, which I really enjoyed. I learned a crazy amount of JavaScript, some pretty advanced debugging / performance profiling techniques, and even gave some talks. Eventually, a lot of people always came to me first whenever they had a question about YUI, which was pretty cool.

From the view of some people in the JavaScript community, YUI was always considered a huge, monolithic framework that was only good for widgets. I never thought that was the case - YUI pioneered a lot of the techniques that are popular in advanced JavaScript development today, like modules, dynamic loading, and creating logical view separation in your code. A lot of the influence in RequireJS / CommonJS / ES6 modules can be seen from what YUI did first, which people used to consider "over-engineering".

With a lot of new development in JavaScript though (data-binding, tooling like Grunt / Yeoman, promises and other async handling techniques), it was always hard for YUI to keep up with new features while still being able to maintain backwards compatibility with the constantly deploying products that people were building at Yahoo. We had to support product teams while also building out the framework at the same time, and making sure the user-facing products were the best was more important. Eventually, it was hard when developers who were familiar with newer JavaScript tools tried to use YUI, but ended up having to spend quite some time with the framework just to get it working with the rest of the JS ecosystem.

In the end, I wasn't involved with this decision, but I think it was the right thing to do. A lot of the YUI (now YPT) team and other front-end teams at Yahoo are now working on helping out with more cutting-edge core JavaScript work, like internationalization and ES6 modules [github.com] , as well as building out components for newer frameworks like React and Ember [github.com] . Yahoo still has a lot of really strong front-end developers, and working on these more important core components is more beneficial to both Yahoo and the JS community as a whole, than continuing to maintain a framework that's a walled garden.

The one thing to take away from this is that no technology lasts forever, and in the end, what the user sees is the most important, whether it's JavaScript, Android / iOS, or holographic smartwatches.

I'll be a bit melancholy today, but I'll raise a glass to YUI tonight. Cheers to all the folks who worked on YUI, and everyone in the YUI community as well - I made a lot of friends there. RIP.

Re:I was a member of the YUI team... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47799433)

Clarence, I tried to learn YUI a couple of times, but both times, I got stuck because I couldn't find a good tutorial that was written for people who know JavaScript, but who were beginners at YUI. Even YUI's main web site didn't help much. The web site had information on how to use the different commands and libraries, but it was like trying to learn Java by reading the Java API.

If anyone is still trying to keep the fires lit under YUI, I suggest that person write a step-by-step tutorial on YUI for beginners. The tutorial should contain the complete code for a simple task, with lots of explanation. Then show how to do the task in different ways, and how to add features to it, etc. Then publicize the tutorial.

Re:I was a member of the YUI team... (1)

Daniel Hoffmann (2902427) | about 1 month ago | (#47799937)

I use the YUI minifier on my projects, you know if they are discontinuing that too? It is more of an auxiliary tool than part of the framework itself right?

Re:I was a member of the YUI team... (1)

clarle (3806979) | about a month ago | (#47814651)

The YUI minifier is being maintained by a community member, but we at Yahoo actually use UglifyJS instead now.

You can take a look at our configuration here: https://github.com/yahoo/yuglify [github.com]

Re:I was a member of the YUI team... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47800149)

Will this impact Yahoo email? ymail has gone through major sets of changes of late. And surprisingly I kind of like it at present. Just curious...

ExtJS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47801647)

What about ExtJS? It was forked from YUI and seems to have a large corporate following complete with decent documentation and dual licenses.

MAR4E (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797657)

has stead1ly

good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47798007)

maybe they'll get that shit off flickr, and i dunno, return it to a simpler, faster, easier layout and site ui?

pussies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47798091)

I code all of my javascript entirely from scratch

pussies

Re:pussies (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 1 month ago | (#47799841)

It must take forever to move all those zeros and ones around.

I prefer to code my javascript entirely from a text editor.

GWT vs YUI I told ya so (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47798243)

Bet on Yahoo supporting YUI for longer than Google is gonna support GWT? Sorry, I tried to tell you.

By Neruos (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47798275)

People still use node.js?

Re:By Neruos (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47800433)

Yahoo! was using PHP before, so that's progress!

Million dollar projects (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 1 month ago | (#47798437)

Million dollar+ projects avoid third party libraries and tools for the reason that extra moving parts leads to project breakage/stoppage after 2-3 years.
The first question after 'Is it BSD/MIT equivalent licensed?' is 'Will there be anyone supporting it with meaningful new features after 1.5 years?' Last stable automated nightly build of sources updated long ago are excluded.

Simply, up front purchasing/procurement considerations are being applied to free/OS tools/libraries including the fitness of use verification.

Last Year's Toys (1)

kidphoton (575170) | about 1 month ago | (#47800787)

Sounds to me like the kids are bored with last year's toys and have become envious of the cool kids' new toys. Strange, because overall the old toys are still more popular than the new toys.

Fix groups! (1)

Walter White (1573805) | about 1 month ago | (#47800829)

Maybe they can turn their attention back to some of their existing code. I'm the owner of a Yahoo group that is receiving spam. There is a spam folder but not all of the emails are marked as spam. I can find no way to mark them as spam. Doh!

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?